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December 11th, 2007

Seldon Labs' tiny technology promises a huge impact

Abstract:
To exploit the nanotube's unusual characteristics, the Seldon team developed what is functionally a paper-making process - making a liquid slurry of nanotube fibers, then compressing and drying it — to create a "nanomesh." Assembled into a cylindrical shape, the nanomesh passes water but catches cysts, parasites, fungi, microorganisms, viruses, and many mineral toxins.

Seldon's market-ready product line is small at present. Mainly, they make two sizes of filter, about the size of fat zucchinis, that can be used in a variety of contexts. Pump dirty water in at one end - not much pressure is needed — and safe, clean water emerges from the other. They're small, convenient, and don't depend on complex supporting technology, not even electricity. Alan says their best use is for disaster relief and for difficult outdoor situations, so their primary buyers are organizations such as FEMA, the Red Cross, and the military.

Source:
timesargus.com

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