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Home > Nanotechnology Columns > UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

September 13th, 2011
Nanotechnology and the baby boom come of age
J. Andres Melendez
CNSE Professor of Nanobioscience, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

In 2010 the first baby boomers reached official retirement age and an additional 10,000 join the ranks on a daily basis(1). The influx of these 78 million retirees over the next 20 years will dramatically change the U.S. age profile and put a heavy burden on both the retirement and Medicare system. Nanoscience integrates engineering, physical and life sciences and has led to major advances in diagnostics and therapeutics for many age-associated diseases. Nanotechnology is leading to discoveries that will extend the working lifespan, decrease medical visits and significantly reduce burden on the rapidly depleting social retirement system. Federal, state and private investments in nanotechnology will help keep the baby boom from busting the bank. Read the Whole Article


July 29th, 2011
Reliability in the nanoworld
James Lloyd
CNSE Senior Research Scientist, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

Every new technology is met with challenges. One of the major challenges associated with the introduction anything new is one that is often overlooked by the population, unless of course it affects them directly, is reliability. If things are going well, reliability is never thought about, but when things are not, there is often hell to pay. Such is the nature of the beast. Read the Whole Article


July 5th, 2011
Super Acid Amplifiers for Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography
Robert Brainard
CNSE Professor of Nanoscience

For 40 years, the microelectronics industry has built integrated circuits with two-fold improvements in coprocessor speed every two years. This remarkable record of success is known as Moore's Law1 and has been driven by the industry's continued advances in packing more computing power (i.e. number of transistors) into each chip. Central to this success has been the use of a progression of shorter and shorter wavelengths of light during fabrication to provide a steady increase in the ability to print smaller and smaller features in these integrated circuits. Read the Whole Article


May 12th, 2011
Nanobioscience at CNSE: Integrating the Animate and Inanimate World
James Castracane
CNSE Professor, Head of Nanobioscience Constellation, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

As the feature sizes of physical structures that can be fabricated have continued to shrink, a crossover point has been reached which brings them into the realm of cells (and their internal components), tissues and biomolecules. This evolution has allowed the creation of devices, sensors, and diagnostic/treatment modalities which exploit the advanced capabilities of integrated circuit (IC) fabrication methods. The micro/nano-scale IC approach, known as "Lab on a Chip", can be used to take advantage of specific cell responses or to collect and analyze targeted cells for medical purposes. Read the Whole Article


March 25th, 2011
The CNSE ecosystem: new niches, adaptation, and population growth
Daniel White
CNSE Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Professional and Corporate Recruitment and Outreach, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) is often described as an evolving and growing ecosystem. This metaphor provides an appealing framework to understand the dynamic academic and technological developments occurring at the CNSE every day. Geographically, the CNSE ecosystem is located in Albany, New York and is built on the Albany NanoTech Complex which covers approximately 800,000 square feet of territory. Read the Whole Article


February 28th, 2011
Novel Energy Storage Device: porous silicon ultracapacitor with superior performance
Manisha V. Rane-Fondacaro
CNSE Materials Scientist and Instructor, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

Current large-scale battery and ultracapacitor technologies are limited in their capability, performance, durability, and cost since they do not use optimum materials, components, and integrated systems. Here at the Energy and Environmental Technology Applications Center (E2TAC), our approach offers tremendous potential as components for next generation batteries and ultracapacitors. Read the Whole Article


January 25th, 2011
Towards NanoRobotics, NanoNetworks and Self-assembling and Regulating Machines
Janet Paluh
CNSE Associate Professor of Nanobioscience, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

The merging of nanobioscience and nanoengineering will allow us to realize new frontiers from nanorobotics to the development of ideal scaffolds for tissue engineering. Like Alice in Wonderland we expect our perceptions of the world to be challenged. In this case how the world inside cells, a system of nanonetworks, communicates across scales with a larger more familiar system of macronetwork assemblies. Read the Whole Article


August 25th, 2010
CNSE's Novel Semiconductor Research and Development Options for Rapid Commercialization
Michael Liehr
CNSE Associate Vice President for Business, Alliances and Consortia; Professor at CNSE, University at Albany - College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

The development of commercial CMOS base technologies and derivative features is aimed at high volume production objectives which justify the very significant development and capital expenditures required. Novel materials and device concepts developed at universities, on the other hand, typically lack access to state-of-the-art 300mm wafer processing capability required for rapid insertion of such concepts into the mainstream manufacturing menu. The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) in Albany provides an environment that bridges the gap between university research opportunities and manufacturing implementation. Two new options for commercial engagements at CNSE are described in this paper. Read the Whole Article


July 28th, 2010
Using Patents to Track the Development of Nanotechnology
Laura Schultz
CNSE Assistant Professor of Nanoeconomics, UAlbany- College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

In the past two decades nanotechnology has enabled the creation of new products and changed how many existing goods are being produced. The economic activity generated from nanotech has been high in magnitude and wide in scope. This impact will only continue to expand in the coming decades. As a nanoeconomist, I am interested in understanding how nanotech is being used by industry and the potential impacts it could have in the marketplace. If we can better understand how nanotech is being created and commercialized, we can track and potentially expedite the development of emerging technologies. A knowledge of the nanotech development process is vital in order to help researchers, companies, investors, and policymakers make more informed decisions when allocating their scarce resources. Read the Whole Article


June 30th, 2010
Carbon Nanotube-based Neural Prosthetics - Where Smaller is Better
Nicolas Tokas
UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering and Department of Biomedical Sciences Ph.D. Candidate, University at Albany - College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

A large motivation for biomedical research is driven for the need of understanding the processes of neurological diseases in humans as well as obtaining the ultimate goal of improving the quality of life for patients. Presently 5.3 million Americans - approximately 2% of the U.S. population - live with disabilities resulting from a traumatic brain injury. These injuries can occur from injury to the brain or spinal cord. Similarly, neurodegeneration in the brain can lead to a diverse range of motor conditions, including loss of limb control to complete "locked-in" paralysis. Read the Whole Article


May 9th, 2010
Neurotechnology - The advancement of Homo sapiens to Homo cyberneticus
Matthew Hynd
CNSE Assistant Professor of Nanobioscience, University at Albany - College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

The convergence of neuroscience and nanotechnology holds promise for the successful development of electronic devices capable of directly interfacing with the central nervous system (CNS). In particular, neural prosthetic devices have become a powerful clinical strategy for the treatment of a variety of neurological disorders, including those sustained as a result of traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and Parkinson's disease (PD). Our research will have a substantive impact on the future abilities of health-care professionals to prevent or ameliorate the effects of neurological disorders using chronically-implanted neural prosthetic devices. Read the Whole Article


April 6th, 2010
Materials Characterization and Nanoscale Materials
Alain Diebold
Professor of Nanoscale Science, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

Nanoscale materials have opened a rich new world of possibilities for science and engineering. In a discussion of nanoscale materials it is useful to divide them into ultra-thin films, ultra thin wires, and nano scale dots. These nano films, wires and dots all exhibit new phenomena which is the origin of the richness. Read the Whole Article


March 5th, 2010
Using Nanotechnology to Study the Human Genome
Scott Tenenbaum
CNSE Associate Head of the Nanobioscience Constellation; Associate Professor of Nanobioscience, University at Albany - College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

As a trained molecular biologist, virologist and cancer biologist, my research at CNSE exploits nanotechnology to study the Human Genome and discover how the recipes of life are turned into flesh and blood. We are also working to develop new methods for studying the spread of cancer from the primary site of a tumor (metastasis) and the inner workings of the single-cell to enhance stem-cell biology research. Read the Whole Article


February 4th, 2010
Post-CMOS Nanoelectronics: Primetime for nanotechnology solutions
Robert Geer
CNSE Vice President for Academic Affairs and CNSE Chief Academic Officer; Professor of Nanoscale Science, University at Albany-College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

Computer chips are what make ‘smart technology' smart. And silicon-based CMOS nanoelectronics comprise the neurons of those electronic brains. Arguably the world's most transformative technology in terms of economic, cultural and social impact, silicon CMOS continues to plunge to ever-smaller device dimensions and ever-expanding levels of integration. And although technologists have long predicted the end of the technological ‘run' of CMOS advancement - often referred to as Moore's Law - the fundamental physics of energy dissipation in nanoscale Si transistors and Cu wiring on today's most advanced chips may well be a challenge that cannot be answered by Si nanoelectronics. Read the Whole Article


October 17th, 2009
Nano Meets Medicine and Public Health
Sara Brenner
CNSE Assistant Vice President for NanoHealth Initiatives & CNSE Assistant Professor of Nanobioscience, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

The revolutionary potential of nanotechnology to improve health through enhanced screening, diagnosis, and treatment of disease currently being explored in an emerging field called "nanomedicine." Medicine has been heralded as one of the most influential fields for the application of nanotechnology in the 21st century. In addition to clinical interventions and treatments, the potential to improve the early detection and prevention of disease is profound. Along with tremendous opportunity comes the responsibility to carefully consider the population-based and public health impacts of nanotechnologies as they are deployed in health care, consumer goods, and the environment.
Read the Whole Article


August 31st, 2009
New Degree, New Curriculum, New Horizons
Daniel R. Smith
CNSE Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and CNSE Director of Student Services, UAlbany - College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

Heraclitus, a 6th century BC Greek philosopher, once said, "There is nothing permanent except change." A change in the academic landscape took place in early June 2009 when the New York State Education Department approved a comprehensive baccalaureate program in Nanoscale Science at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) of the University at Albany. Read the Whole Article


July 20th, 2009
What is lithography?
John G.Hartley
CNSE Associate Head of the Nanoengineering Constellation, CNSE Professor of Nanoengineering, UAlbany - College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

Lithography is a word with two distinct definitions. If you Google "lithography", 7 of the first 10 hits will refer you to the art world and a process invented by Aloys Senefelder in 1788(1). A short description of the process from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary defines it as "the process of printing from a plane surface (as a smooth stone or metal plate) on which the image to be printed is ink-receptive and the blank area ink-repellent". This definition belies the major role that the second definition plays in modern society. Again, from Merrian-Webster, we have the second definition: "the process of producing patterns on semiconductor crystals for use as integrated circuits". It is not an understatement to claim that progress in lithography is the engine that has driven much of the world's high-tech economy over the last 50 years. Read the Whole Article


June 16th, 2009
Energy Storage Related Research at the UAlbany NanoCollege
Pradeep Haldar
Head Nanoengineering Constellation; Professor of Nanoengineering, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

The energy consumption is projected to double in the next fifty years. The low carbon foot print of renewables such as wind, solar, fuel cells, etc. makes them especially attractive in this era of environmental consciousness. The intermittent nature of energy from renewables is not suitable for commercial and residential grid applications, unless the power can be delivered 24/7, with minimum fluctuation. Therefore, the viability of renewables as a source of energy critically depends on energy storage technologies such as batteries and ultracapacitors. Read the Whole Article


May 6th, 2009
Nanobiotechnology: From Stem Cell, Tissue Engineering To Cancer Research
Yubing Xie
CNSE Assistant Professor of Nanobioscience, College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

Nanobiotechnology is the application of nanotechnology for the study of biological and biomedical systems. One of the major areas is the utility of nanoscale systems and nanofabricated devices to guide stem cell development, mimic tissue regeneration and develop tools for cancer research.
Read the Whole Article


March 20th, 2009
Shift Work
John Elter
Executive Director of the Center for Sustainable Ecosystem Nanotechnologies;Empire Innovation Professor of Nanoengineering, UAlbany- College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

Shift work is an employment practice that makes use of each hour of the clock. Every minute of every day. Therefore it is an appropriate term to encapsulate our immediate need to redefine, to shift, the way we think about our planet and the way we use our resources. This thought shift is a cognitive and behavioral revolution that we need to wage every minute of every day until we collectively stop making unsustainable choices.

Read the Whole Article


February 27th, 2009
We need to prepare for the recovery
Ed Cupoli
CNSE Head of Nanoeconomics Constellation, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

By Edward M. Cupoli for The Business Review

"The Chinese use two brush strokes to write the word ‘crisis.' One brush stroke stands for danger; the other for opportunity. In a crisis, be aware of the danger, but recognize the opportunity."

Those words, spoken 50 years ago by President John F. Kennedy, have newfound meaning amid the most challenging economic crisis since the Great Depression. The danger is apparent, with layoffs, closures and rising costs affecting people and businesses in our community and throughout the world. Certainly, it will take bold and decisive action, for which work is already underway on the state and national levels, to address those critical issues. Read the Whole Article


September 30th, 2008
Goldilocks, X-rays, and Nanotechnology
Richard Matyi
Professor of Nanoscience, UAlbany - College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

X-rays - electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths that are typically of the order of 0.05 nm to 1 nm - are finding growing importance in nanoscale measurement technology and metrology. Their sub-nanometer wavelengths and their typical weak interactions with solids make X-ray probes a nearly ideal way of studying the structural characteristics of thin layer and nanoscaled structures that underlie much of modern nanotechnology. The fact that the probing wavelength is commensurate with the sizes of nanostructured objects results in interactions (in particular, scattering processes) that occur over practically measureable length and angular scales. Read the Whole Article


August 26th, 2008
Advanced Energy Storage Devices
Manisha V. Rane-Fondacaro
CNSE Materials Scientist and Instructor, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

The projected doubling of world energy consumption in the next fifty years will require certain measures to meet this demand. The ideal choice of energy provider needs to be reliable, efficient, and from a low emissions source such as wind, solar etc. The low carbon footprint of renewables is an added benefit, which makes them especially attractive during this era of environmental consciousness. Unfortunately, the intermittent nature of energy from these renewables is not suitable for the commercial and residential grid application, unless the power is delivered 24x7, with minimum fluctuation. This requires intervention of efficient electrical energy storage (EES) technology to make power generation from renewables practical. Read the Whole Article


July 25th, 2008
CMOS-Nano Hybrid Research of CNSE NanoDesign and Modeling Group
Wei Wang
Assistant Professor and Senior Research Scientist of Nanoscale Engineering, UAlbany- College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

Abstract:
The marriage of nanotechnology and CMOS technology will lead to CMOS-nano hybrid technology, which can dramatically advance the development of future integrated circuits (ICs). The CNSE NanoDesign and Modeling (NDM) Group has made new progress in developing CMOS-nano hybrid technologies including the development of new interconnect-based CMOS-hybrid circuits and new reconfigurable structures utilizing nanojunction devices. These new methods open new opportunities to build next generation ICs and are expected to have a huge impact to world-wide IC industries.
Read the Whole Article


June 30th, 2008
The other side of the market
Laura Schultz
CNSE Assistant Professor of Nanoeconomics, UAlbany- College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

Scientists and engineers have been successful breaking through the technical barriers affecting the supply of nanotechnology enabled products. Efforts must also be dedicated to overcoming the barriers to demand for nanotechnology. The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering is working to overcome barriers to demand. Surveys indicate that consumers are uninformed about nanotechnology and are concerned about the potential health and environmental impacts. Outreach programs at the CNSE play an important role in educating consumers about nanotechnology to help them make informed decisions. In addition, research programs and collaborations housed at the CNSE circumvent potential barriers by focusing on the development of nanotechnology solutions for which there is existing demand. Read the Whole Article


May 28th, 2008
CNSE's Multi-level Programs that Encourage Science Awareness
Diana Martin
Manager, Strategic and Educational Outreach, UAlbany- College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

CNSE is firmly committed to raising awareness of the benefits of nanotechnology through a wide array of innovative programs, events and activities that have a significant impact on schoolchildren, the surrounding community, the State of New York and beyond. Read the Whole Article


April 23rd, 2008
CNSE creates the Center for Sustainable EcoSystem Nanotechnologies
John Elter
Executive Director of the Center for Sustainable Ecosystem Nanotechnologies;Empire Innovation Professor of Nanoengineering, UAlbany- College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering ("CNSE") of the University at Albany, SUNY, has established the new Center for Sustainable EcoSystem Nanotechnologies to identify and develop and produce the critical nano-materials, devices and structures needed to realize the commercial development of truly sustainable system. The Center will provide critical design analysis, pilot prototyping and proof of concept to enable advanced systems and structures for integration within a host of renewable energy technologies. The Center will be housed in a new "zero energy" nanotechnology building or "ZEN" facility which will itself be the laboratory to demonstrate advanced ecosystem technologies. Read the Whole Article


March 25th, 2008
Advancing Nanoscience through R&D Consortia
Chris Borst
Process Engineering Manager, UAlbany- College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

Although the terms ‘nanoscale' and ‘nanoscience' have recently found common use, the semiconductor industry has been finding solutions to roadblocks and challenges on the nanometer level for the past several decades. The fundamental building block of the semiconductor devices used in computers, cell phones, and other high tech devices, is the complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistor. Read the Whole Article


January 22nd, 2008
The Application of Nanotechnology in Stem Cell Research
Yubing Xie
CNSE Assistant Professor of Nanobioscience, College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

Nanotechnology and stem cells are two of the most promising research areas. Stem cell nanotechnology refers to the application of nanotechnology in stem cell research. The marriage of nanotechnology and stem cells will dramatically advance our ability to understand and control stem cell-fate decisions and develop novel stem cell technologies, which will eventually lead to stem cell-based therapeutics for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases. Read the Whole Article


December 21st, 2007
Problem Recognition in Legal Analyses Involving Nanotechnology
Brenda Lubrano-Birken
General Counsel & Director of Legal Services, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

Amid the ever-increasing innovation and opportunity that result from the integration of nanotechnology across virtually every industry, the ability to incorporate those innovations and take advantage of such prospects is key. Whether the business model is a start-up, established company or educational/research and development facility, it is also equally important to include a healthy dose of problem recognition at various steps along the way, which is vital both for legal purposes and for developing microstrategies within an organization. Read the Whole Article


November 19th, 2007
CNSE Creates the Center for NanoScale Lithography in partnership with Vistec Lithography
Dr.Timothy Groves
Empire Innovation Professor of Nanoscale Science; Director, Center for Nanolithography Development, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

The College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering (CNSE) of the University at Albany, working in partnership with global industry leader Vistec Lithography, has established the Center for NanoScale Lithography (CNL), a world-class center for research and development in the creation of patterns on the nanometer scale of dimensions. Nanoscale patterning is one of several essential components, needed to assure the future of nanotechnology. Read the Whole Article


October 15th, 2007
Nano-Science and Technology in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors
Alain Diebold
Professor of Nanoscale Science, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) continues to provide the most up to date view into the semiconductor industries technology requirements and potential solutions for those requirements. Read the Whole Article


September 15th, 2007
CNSE and the birth of NanoEconomics
Ed Cupoli
CNSE Head of Nanoeconomics Constellation, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

NanoEconomics is the branch of economics that studies the creation and distribution of wealth related to the technological changes brought by nanotechnology. NanoEconomics focuses on understanding the extent of the change that will be brought upon not by a single field of science research but by the convergence of many. Due to the extraordinary amount of innovation that is being generated by nanotechnology as a result of the positive cross-linkages between highly competitive industries (i.e. semiconductor, information technology and pharmaceutical industries), it can be foreseen that to study NanoEconomics is to study the new paradigms in the next industrial revolution. Read the Whole Article


August 15th, 2007
Nanobiology
Nathaniel C. Cady
Asst. Professor of Nanobiology, CNSE University of Albany

Nanobiology, as a field of study, signifies the merger of biological research with nanotechnologies such as nanodevices, nanoparticles, or unique nanoscale phenomena. Although molecular biologists have been working with nano-sized biomolecules for the last few decades, nanobiology was not defined as a discipline until researchers started making a focused effort to use our knowledge of nanotechnology to tackle biological problems. Read the Whole Article


July 13th, 2007
The 'Power' of Nanotechnology
Pradeep Haldar
Head Nanoengineering Constellation; Professor of Nanoengineering, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

As worldwide demand for energy surges at an ever-increasing rate, there is a new urgency to improve the efficiency and sustainability of power generation technologies. One of the keys to addressing this challenge is innovation, and some of the most promising solutions are occurring at the smallest scale - the nanoscale. Read the Whole Article


June 15th, 2007
Determining Atomic Surface Structure Using Atomic Scale Imaging and First Principles Theory
Vince LaBella
Assistant Professor of Nanoscience, College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

The atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces is becoming increasingly important for nanotechnology as physical dimensions of device structures are ultimately being pushed to the atomic limit. The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has given profound insight into the nature of surfaces on the nano and atomic scale. However, interpreting STM images can be difficult due to several contrast mechanisms such as sample-tip convolution effects or bias-dependent variations in the local density of states (LDOS). However, when atomic scale STM images are combined with theoretically generated images from first principles calculations insight into the atomic arrangements can be made. Read the Whole Article


May 16th, 2007
Critical Dimension Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy
Brad Thiel
Associate Prof of Nanoscience, University at Albany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

Critical dimension (CD) metrology is one of the most critical enabling technologies in semiconductor manufacturing. Much media attention is devoted to the ever shrinking feature sizes of microelectronic devices, as this parameter heavily influences speed of operation and power demands. Read the Whole Article


April 13th, 2007
Nano-optics: Shining a new ‘light' on strained silicon
Robert Geer
CNSE Vice President for Academic Affairs and CNSE Chief Academic Officer; Professor of Nanoscale Science, University at Albany-College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering

No field has been impacted by nanotechnology more profoundly than the nanoelectronics industry. ‘Nanochips' play an increasing role in virtually all aspects of our lives - from high-performance computing, communication, and artificial intelligence to the rapidly expanding fields of nanobiology and nanomedicine. Read the Whole Article


March 15th, 2007
CNSE Addresses Unique Nanotechnology Challenges
Michael Fancher
Associate Professor of Nanoeconomics, UAlbany College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI), a consortium of Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) member companies, to charter the Nanoelectronics Research Corporation (NERC) to develop and administer a university-based program to address the lower size limits of complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS) technology that will be reached in about 10 years. Read the Whole Article

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