Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Researchers use electron microscope to turn nanotube into tiny transistor

Professor Dmitri Golberg has lead a time that used a unique tool inserted into an electron microscope to create a transistor that’s 25,000 smaller than the width of a human hair.

CREDIT
QUT
Professor Dmitri Golberg has lead a time that used a unique tool inserted into an electron microscope to create a transistor that’s 25,000 smaller than the width of a human hair. CREDIT QUT

Abstract:
An international team of researchers have used a unique tool inserted into an electron microscope to create a transistor that’s 25,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair.

Researchers use electron microscope to turn nanotube into tiny transistor

Brisbane, Australia | Posted on December 24th, 2021

The research, published in the journal Science, involves researchers from Japan, China, Russia and Australia who have worked on the project that began five years ago.

QUT Centre for Materials Science co-director Professor Dmitri Golberg, who led the research project, said the result was a “very interesting fundamental discovery” which could lead a way for the future development of tiny transistors for future generations of advanced computing devices.

“In this work, we have shown it is possible to control the electronic properties of an individual carbon nanotube,” Professor Golberg said.

The researchers created the tiny transistor by simultaneously applying a force and low voltage which heated a carbon nanotube made up of few layers until outer tube shells separate, leaving just a single-layer nanotube.

The heat and strain then changed the “chilarity” of the nanotube, meaning the pattern in which the carbon atoms joined together to form the single-atomic layer of the nanotube wall was rearranged.

The result of the new structure connecting the carbon atoms was that the nanotube was transformed into a transistor.

Professor Golberg’s team members from the National University of Science and Technology in Moscow created a theory explaining the changes in the atomic structure and properties observed in the transistor.

Lead author Dr Dai-Ming Tang, from the International Centre for Materials Nanoarchitectonics in Japan, said the research had demonstrated the ability to manipulate the molecular properties of the nanotube to fabricated nanoscale electrical device.

Dr Tang began working on the project five years ago when Professor Golberg headed up the research group at this centre.

“Semiconducting carbon nanotubes are promising for fabricating energy-efficient nanotransistors to build beyond-silicon microprocessors,” Dr Tang said.

“However, it remains a great challenge to control the chirality of individual carbon nanotubes, which uniquely determines the atomic geometry and electronic structure.

“In this work, we designed and fabricated carbon nanotube intramolecular transistors by altering the local chirality of a metallic nanotube segment by heating and mechanical strain.”

Professor Golberg said the research in demonstrating the fundamental science in creating the tiny transistor was a promising step towards building beyond-silicon microprocessors.

Transistors, which are used to switch and amplify electronic signals, are often called the “building blocks” of all electronic devices, including computers. For example, Apple says the chip which powers the future iPhones contains 15 billion transistors.

The computer industry has been focussed on developing smaller and smaller transistors for decades, but faces the limitations of silicon.

In recent years, researchers have made significant steps in developing nanotransistors, which are so small that millions of them could fit onto the head of a pin.

“Miniaturization of transistors down to nanometer scale is a great challenge of the modern semiconducting industry and nanotechnology,” Professor Golberg said.

“The present discovery, although not practical for a mass-production of tiny transistors, shows a novel fabrication principle and opens up a new horizon of using thermomechanical treatments of nanotubes for obtaining the smallest transistors with desired characteristics.”

An international team of researchers have used a unique tool inserted into an electron microscope to create a transistor that’s 25,000 smaller than the width of a human hair.

The research, published in the journal Science, involves researchers from Japan, China, Russia and Australia who have worked on the project that began five years ago.

QUT Centre for Materials Science co-director Professor Dmitri Golberg, who led the research project, said the result was a “very interesting fundamental discovery” which could lead a way for the future development of tiny transistors for future generations of advanced computing devices.

“In this work, we have shown it is possible to control the electronic properties of an individual carbon nanotube,” Professor Golberg said.

The researchers created the tiny transistor by simultaneously applying a force and low voltage which heated a carbon nanotube made up of few layers until outer tube shells separate, leaving just a single-layer nanotube.

The heat and strain then changed the “chilarity” of the nanotube, meaning the pattern in which the carbon atoms joined together to form the single-atomic layer of the nanotube wall was rearranged.

The result of the new structure connecting the carbon atoms was that the nanotube was transformed into a transistor.

Professor Golberg’s team members from the National University of Science and Technology in Moscow created a theory explaining the changes in the atomic structure and properties observed in the transistor.

Lead author Dr Dai-Ming Tang, from the International Centre for Materials Nanoarchitectonics in Japan, said the research had demonstrated the ability to manipulate the molecular properties of the nanotube to fabricated nanoscale electrical device.

Dr Tang began working on the project five years ago when Professor Golberg headed up the research group at this centre.

“Semiconducting carbon nanotubes are promising for fabricating energy-efficient nanotransistors to build beyond-silicon microprocessors,” Dr Tang said.

“However, it remains a great challenge to control the chirality of individual carbon nanotubes, which uniquely determines the atomic geometry and electronic structure.

“In this work, we designed and fabricated carbon nanotube intramolecular transistors by altering the local chirality of a metallic nanotube segment by heating and mechanical strain.”

Professor Golberg said the research in demonstrating the fundamental science in creating the tiny transistor was a promising step towards building beyond-silicon microprocessors.

Transistors, which are used to switch and amplify electronic signals, are often called the “building blocks” of all electronic devices, including computers. For example, Apple says the chip which powers the future iPhones contains 15 billion transistors.

The computer industry has been focussed on developing smaller and smaller transistors for decades, but faces the limitations of silicon.

In recent years, researchers have made significant steps in developing nanotransistors, which are so small that millions of them could fit onto the head of a pin.

“Miniaturization of transistors down to nanometer scale is a great challenge of the modern semiconducting industry and nanotechnology,” Professor Golberg said.

“The present discovery, although not practical for a mass-production of tiny transistors, shows a novel fabrication principle and opens up a new horizon of using thermomechanical treatments of nanotubes for obtaining the smallest transistors with desired characteristics.”

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Rod Chester
Queensland University of Technology

Office: 61-731-389-449

Copyright © Queensland University of Technology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

ARTICLE TITLE

Related News Press

News and information

Engineering piezoelectricity and strain sensitivity in CdS to promote piezocatalytic hydrogen evolution May 13th, 2022

New nanomechanical oscillators with record-low loss May 13th, 2022

Small microring array enables large complex-valued matrix multiplication May 13th, 2022

Study finds nanomedicine targeting lymph nodes key to triple negative breast cancer treatment: In mice, nanomedicine can remodel the immune microenvironment in lymph node and tumor tissue for long-term remission and lung tumor elimination in this form of metastasized breast cance May 13th, 2022

Imaging

Snapshot measurement of single nanostructure’s circular dichroism March 25th, 2022

Better understanding superconductors with Higgs spectroscopy Prof. Stefan Kaiser from TU Dresden awarded ERC Consolidator Grant March 18th, 2022

Turning any camera into a polarization camera: Metasurface attachment can be used with almost any optical system, from machine vision cameras to telescopes March 18th, 2022

Visualizing the invisible: New fluorescent DNA label reveals nanoscopic cancer features March 4th, 2022

Possible Futures

Engineering piezoelectricity and strain sensitivity in CdS to promote piezocatalytic hydrogen evolution May 13th, 2022

New nanomechanical oscillators with record-low loss May 13th, 2022

Small microring array enables large complex-valued matrix multiplication May 13th, 2022

Study finds nanomedicine targeting lymph nodes key to triple negative breast cancer treatment: In mice, nanomedicine can remodel the immune microenvironment in lymph node and tumor tissue for long-term remission and lung tumor elimination in this form of metastasized breast cance May 13th, 2022

Chip Technology

Going gentle on mechanical quantum systems: New experimental work establishes how quantum properties of mechanical quantum systems can be measured without destroying the quantum state May 13th, 2022

On-Chip Photodetection: Two-dimensional material heterojunctions hetero-integration May 13th, 2022

Small microring array enables large complex-valued matrix multiplication May 13th, 2022

Rice ‘metalens’ could disrupt vacuum UV market: Solid-state nanophotonic technology could potentially replace cabinets of equipment May 6th, 2022

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Protective equipment with graphene nanotubes meets the strictest ESD safety standards March 25th, 2022

CEA and Startup C12 Join Forces to Develop Next-Generation Quantum Computers with Multi-Qubit Chips at Wafer Scale March 25th, 2022

Studied for clean energy, carbon nanotubes find new potential in anticancer drug delivery: Short carbon nanotubes in liposome membranes help fuse the liposomes and cancer cells to directly deliver a cancer-killing drug January 28th, 2022

A single molecule makes a big splash in the understanding of the two types of water January 7th, 2022

Discoveries

Going gentle on mechanical quantum systems: New experimental work establishes how quantum properties of mechanical quantum systems can be measured without destroying the quantum state May 13th, 2022

New nanomechanical oscillators with record-low loss May 13th, 2022

Small microring array enables large complex-valued matrix multiplication May 13th, 2022

Study finds nanomedicine targeting lymph nodes key to triple negative breast cancer treatment: In mice, nanomedicine can remodel the immune microenvironment in lymph node and tumor tissue for long-term remission and lung tumor elimination in this form of metastasized breast cance May 13th, 2022

Announcements

Engineering piezoelectricity and strain sensitivity in CdS to promote piezocatalytic hydrogen evolution May 13th, 2022

New nanomechanical oscillators with record-low loss May 13th, 2022

Small microring array enables large complex-valued matrix multiplication May 13th, 2022

Study finds nanomedicine targeting lymph nodes key to triple negative breast cancer treatment: In mice, nanomedicine can remodel the immune microenvironment in lymph node and tumor tissue for long-term remission and lung tumor elimination in this form of metastasized breast cance May 13th, 2022

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Lightening up the nanoscale long-wavelength optoelectronics May 13th, 2022

On-Chip Photodetection: Two-dimensional material heterojunctions hetero-integration May 13th, 2022

Development of high-durability single-atomic catalyst using industrial humidifier: Identification of the operating mechanism of cobalt-based single-atomic catalyst and development of a mass production process. Utilization for catalyst development in various fields including fuel May 13th, 2022

Engineering piezoelectricity and strain sensitivity in CdS to promote piezocatalytic hydrogen evolution May 13th, 2022

Tools

Snapshot measurement of single nanostructure’s circular dichroism March 25th, 2022

Eyebrow-raising: Researchers reveal why nanowires stick to each other February 11th, 2022

JEOL Introduces New Scanning Electron Microscope with “Simple SEM” Automation and Live Elemental and 3D Analysis January 14th, 2022

Super-resolved imaging of a single cold atom on a nanosecond timescale January 7th, 2022

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project