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Home > Press > Where Nano gets bigger, or, serving imagination at the nanoscale

Above Right: Nature’s design – 3D cryo-EM reconstruction of a clathrin cage (adapted with permission from Vigers et al (1986), The EMBO Journal, 5 (3), 529-534).

Above Left: Artificial design – Atomic Force Microscopy topographic image of a self-assembled DNA (courtesy of Paul W.K. Rothemund and Nick Papadakis).
Above Right: Nature’s design – 3D cryo-EM reconstruction of a clathrin cage (adapted with permission from Vigers et al (1986), The EMBO Journal, 5 (3), 529-534). Above Left: Artificial design – Atomic Force Microscopy topographic image of a self-assembled DNA (courtesy of Paul W.K. Rothemund and Nick Papadakis).

Abstract:
A nanotech book just published by the Royal Society of Chemistry discusses the latest progress and main principles in designing nanoscale molecular architectures

Where Nano gets bigger, or, serving imagination at the nanoscale

Leicester, UK | Posted on June 29th, 2009

How to construct molecular architectures with nanoscale dimensions at whim?

Can imagined shapes and objects be designed to self-build?

Are these useful?


An answer to all these questions is given in a new book by a Leicester Chemistry Lecturer, Dr Max Ryadnov.

The book, entitled *Bionanodesign*, discusses the design of nanostructures using Nature for inspiration. The main mission of the publication is to satisfy the demands that motivate the search for first principles in engineering biologically inspired nanostructures.

In this sense, the volume takes an unconventional approach in delivering the material of this kind. It does not lead straight to applications or methods as most nanotechnology works tend to do, but instead it admits the initial and primary stress on "nano" rather than on "technology".

The book has three core chapters highlighting three prominent topics of nanoscience and technology where the role of nanodesign is predominant:

* using DNA to create various geometric nanoscale objects and patterns
* the pursuit of an artificial virus to use as a magic bullet in gene therapy
* designing synthetic nanomatrices for regenerative medicine.

The title is the latest in the RSC Nanoscience & Nanotechnology book series designed to cover the wide ranging areas of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and provides a comprehensive source of information on research associated with nanostructured materials.

Publication details:

Title:
Bionanodesign: Following Nature's Touch
Author: Maxim Ryadnov
ISBN: 978-0-85404-162-6
Format: Hardback
Pages: 250
Price: £99.95

####

About University of Leicester
The University of Leicester is a leading UK university committed to international excellence through the creation of world changing research and high quality, inspirational teaching.

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