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Home > News > Q&A: "Where Has All the Water Gone?"

December 15th, 2007

Q&A: "Where Has All the Water Gone?"

Abstract:
Imagine a planet where nuclear-powered desalination plants ring the world's oceans; corporate nanotechnology cleans up sewage water so private utilities can sell it back to consumers in plastic bottles at huge profit; and the poor who lack access to clean water die in increased numbers.

This may sound like science fiction dystopia, but according to Maude Barlow, author of the recently released book "Blue Covenant: The Global Water Crisis and the Coming Battle for the Right to Water", this future is not too far away.

Source:
ipsnews.net

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