Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Designing a pop-up future: Simple origami fold may hold the key to designing pop-up furniture, medical devices and scientific tools

This image shows various shapes made from Miura-ori pattern.
CREDIT: Mahadevan Lab
This image shows various shapes made from Miura-ori pattern.

CREDIT: Mahadevan Lab

Abstract:
What if you could make any object out of a flat sheet of paper?

That future is on the horizon thanks to new research by L. Mahadevan, the Lola England de Valpine Professor of Applied Mathematics, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and Physics at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). He is also a core faculty member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and member of the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology, at Harvard University.

Designing a pop-up future: Simple origami fold may hold the key to designing pop-up furniture, medical devices and scientific tools

Cambridge, MA | Posted on January 27th, 2016

Mahadevan and his team have characterized a fundamental origami fold, or tessellation, that could be used as a building block to create almost any three-dimensional shape, from nanostructures to buildings. The research is published in Nature Materials.

The folding pattern, known as the Miura-ori, is a periodic way to tile the plane using the simplest mountain-valley fold in origami. It was used as a decorative item in clothing at least as long ago as the 15th century. A folded Miura can be packed into a flat, compact shape and unfolded in one continuous motion, making it ideal for packing rigid structures like solar panels. It also occurs in nature in a variety of situations, such as in insect wings and certain leaves.

"Could this simple folding pattern serve as a template for more complicated shapes, such as saddles, spheres, cylinders, and helices?" asked Mahadevan.

"We found an incredible amount of flexibility hidden inside the geometry of the Miura-ori," said Levi Dudte, graduate student in the Mahadevan lab and first author of the paper. "As it turns out, this fold is capable of creating many more shapes than we imagined."

Think surgical stents that can be packed flat and pop-up into three-dimensional structures once inside the body or dining room tables that can lean flat against the wall until they are ready to be used.

"The collapsibility, transportability and deployability of Miura-ori folded objects makes it a potentially attractive design for everything from space-bound payloads to small-space living to laparoscopic surgery and soft robotics," said Dudte.

To explore the potential of the tessellation, the team developed an algorithm that can create certain shapes using the Miura-ori fold, repeated with small variations. Given the specifications of the target shape, the program lays out the folds needed to create the design, which can then be laser printed for folding.

The program takes into account several factors, including the stiffness of the folded material and the trade-off between the accuracy of the pattern and the effort associated with creating finer folds - an important characterization because, as of now, these shapes are all folded by hand.

"Essentially, we would like to be able to tailor any shape by using an appropriate folding pattern," said Mahadevan. "Starting with the basic mountain-valley fold, our algorithm determines how to vary it by gently tweaking it from one location to the other to make a vase, a hat, a saddle, or to stitch them together to make more and more complex structures."

"This is a step in the direction of being able to solve the inverse problem - given a functional shape, how can we design the folds on a sheet to achieve it," Dudte said.

"The really exciting thing about this fold is it is completely scalable," said Mahadevan. "You can do this with graphene, which is one atom thick, or you can do it on the architectural scale."

###

Co-authors on the study include Etienne Vouga, currently at the University of Texas at Austin, and Tomohiro Tachi from the University of Tokyo. The work was funded by the Wyss Institute for Bioinspired Engineering, the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology, and the Harvard MRSEC.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Leah Burrows

617-495-1351

Copyright © Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sc

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Princeton-led team discovers unexpected quantum behavior in kagome lattice:Experiments suggest evidence for novel patterns of electronic charge distribution in a kagome material whose handedness can be manipulated with a magnetic field June 18th, 2021

Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world June 18th, 2021

Compact quantum computer for server centers: Researchers build smallest quantum computer yet based on industry standards June 18th, 2021

Graphene/ Graphite

Graphene drum: Researchers develop new phonon laser design June 18th, 2021

Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world June 18th, 2021

Possible Futures

AI app could help diagnose HIV more accurately: Pioneering technology developed by UCL (University College London) and Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI) researchers could transform the ability to accurately interpret HIV test results, particularly in low- and middle-income June 18th, 2021

Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world June 18th, 2021

Compact quantum computer for server centers: Researchers build smallest quantum computer yet based on industry standards June 18th, 2021

Changing a 2D material's symmetry can unlock its promise: Jian Shi Research Group engineers material into promising optoelectronic June 18th, 2021

Nanomedicine

AI app could help diagnose HIV more accurately: Pioneering technology developed by UCL (University College London) and Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI) researchers could transform the ability to accurately interpret HIV test results, particularly in low- and middle-income June 18th, 2021

'Nanodecoy' therapy binds and neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 virus June 18th, 2021

Turning the heat on: A flexible device for localized heat treatment of living tissues June 11th, 2021

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals to Participate in Upcoming Conferences June 2nd, 2021

Discoveries

AI app could help diagnose HIV more accurately: Pioneering technology developed by UCL (University College London) and Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI) researchers could transform the ability to accurately interpret HIV test results, particularly in low- and middle-income June 18th, 2021

Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world June 18th, 2021

Compact quantum computer for server centers: Researchers build smallest quantum computer yet based on industry standards June 18th, 2021

Changing a 2D material's symmetry can unlock its promise: Jian Shi Research Group engineers material into promising optoelectronic June 18th, 2021

Materials/Metamaterials

Novel liquid crystal metalens offers electric zoom June 17th, 2021

Active platinum species: Catalytic high-temperature oxidations: Individual atom or metal cluster? June 16th, 2021

New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered June 11th, 2021

Researchers turned transparent calcite into artificial gold June 11th, 2021

Announcements

Proliferation of electric vehicles based on high-performance, low-cost sodium-ion battery:A large-capacity anode material is developed for sodium-ion batteries by using low-cost silicone-based oil. This process, if commercialized, is expected to significantly reduce manufacturing June 18th, 2021

AI app could help diagnose HIV more accurately: Pioneering technology developed by UCL (University College London) and Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI) researchers could transform the ability to accurately interpret HIV test results, particularly in low- and middle-income June 18th, 2021

Compact quantum computer for server centers: Researchers build smallest quantum computer yet based on industry standards June 18th, 2021

Changing a 2D material's symmetry can unlock its promise: Jian Shi Research Group engineers material into promising optoelectronic June 18th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Princeton-led team discovers unexpected quantum behavior in kagome lattice:Experiments suggest evidence for novel patterns of electronic charge distribution in a kagome material whose handedness can be manipulated with a magnetic field June 18th, 2021

AI app could help diagnose HIV more accurately: Pioneering technology developed by UCL (University College London) and Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI) researchers could transform the ability to accurately interpret HIV test results, particularly in low- and middle-income June 18th, 2021

Compact quantum computer for server centers: Researchers build smallest quantum computer yet based on industry standards June 18th, 2021

Changing a 2D material's symmetry can unlock its promise: Jian Shi Research Group engineers material into promising optoelectronic June 18th, 2021

Tools

Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world June 18th, 2021

A novel nitrogen-doped dual-emission carbon dots as an effective fluorescent probe for ratiometric detection dopamine June 1st, 2021

Using the environment to control quantum devices: A deeper understanding of how the environment impacts quantum behaviour is bringing quantum devices one step closer to widespread adoption June 1st, 2021

Nanophotonics enhanced coverslip for phase imaging in biology May 14th, 2021

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Princeton-led team discovers unexpected quantum behavior in kagome lattice:Experiments suggest evidence for novel patterns of electronic charge distribution in a kagome material whose handedness can be manipulated with a magnetic field June 18th, 2021

'Nanodecoy' therapy binds and neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 virus June 18th, 2021

Using HPC and experiment, researchers continue to refine graphene production: Researchers from the Technical University of Munich have been using GCS HPC resources to develop more efficient methods for producing graphene at the industrial scale June 4th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

Research partnerships

New family of atomic-thin electride materials discovered June 11th, 2021

Magnetism drives metals to insulators in new experiment: Study provides new tools to probe novel spintronic devices June 4th, 2021

Hexagonal boron nitride's remarkable toughness unmasked: 2D material resists cracking and description by century-old theory of fracture mechanics June 2nd, 2021

Nanophotonics enhanced coverslip for phase imaging in biology May 14th, 2021

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project