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Home > Press > Anasys adds arbitrary polarization control to the nanoIR™, the nanoscale IR spectroscopy system.

Abstract:
Anasys Instruments, the company that pioneered nanoscale thermal analysis and nanoscale IR spectroscopy using an AFM, is pleased to announce further capabilities for their nanoIR nanoscale infrared spectroscopy system.

Anasys adds arbitrary polarization control to the nanoIR™, the nanoscale IR spectroscopy system.

Santa Barbara, CA | Posted on March 12th, 2012

The availability of arbitrary polarization control enables the user to measure and visualize molecular orientation with nanoscale spatial resolution. This is useful in a variety of applications where the understanding molecular orientation is important. One of the most exciting applications is the study of polymeric fibers where molecular orientation is vital to controlling their properties.

This work is underscored during this year's Pittsburgh Conference being held in Orlando. Professor Bruce Chase from the University of Delaware is to deliver an invited talk on the structure and orientation in electrospun nanofibers. His keynote presentation will include spatially resolved measurements of molecular orientation obtained by a technique combining atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR). The measurements were performed in collaboration with Anasys Instruments using an AFM-IR instrument incorporating the new arbitrary polarization angle control capability. By measuring the infrared absorption of a sample locally as a function of polarization angle, it is possible to identify regions that have a high degree of molecular orientation. Being able to control molecular orientation is a critically important technology for improving the performance of polymers. The new polarization control capability provides this ability to observe molecular orientation with high spatial resolution at the nanoscale.

For further details come to the Anasys Instruments booth at Pittcon, #823, or visit www.anasysinstruments.com

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About Anasys Instruments
Anasys Instruments Corporation was founded in 2005 by an experienced team of AFM industry pioneers and scientists with the goal of creating innovative analytic tools that enable a better understanding of structure, property, and function at the nanoscale. The Santa Barbara, California-based company has already developed and introduced three award-winning technologies: nanoscale thermal analysis (nano-TA), transition temperature microscopy (TTM), and nanoscale infrared spectroscopy (nanoIR).

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Anasys contact:
Roshan Shetty
Anasys Instruments Corporation
121 Gray Avenue, Suite 100
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
USA
T +1 (805) 730-3310


Media contact:
Jezz Leckenby
Talking Science Limited
39 de Bohun Court
Saffron Walden
Essex CB10 2BA
UK
T +44 (0) 1799 521881
M +44 (0) 7843 012997
www.talking-science.com

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