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Home > Press > New Report From Public Interest Groups Warns of Risks From Nanomaterials in Sunscreens

Abstract:
Friends of the Earth, Consumers Union, and the International Center for Technology Assessment (ICTA) released a report today detailing why consumers should be wary of sunscreens that contain nanomaterials.

New Report From Public Interest Groups Warns of Risks From Nanomaterials in Sunscreens

Washington, DC | Posted on August 20th, 2009

Engineered nanomaterials are widely used in sunscreens to make sun-blocking ingredients like titanium dioxide and zinc oxide rub on clear instead of white. These materials have been shown to exhibit different fundamental physical, biological, and chemical properties than their larger counterparts. The report indicates that very few nanomaterials have been adequately tested, though the limited data that is available shows that their small size makes them more able to enter the lungs, pass through cell membranes, and possibly penetrate damaged or sun-burnt skin.

"Nano-sunscreens are being promoted as safe sun protection, but the evidence of potential risk we've collected shows otherwise," said Friends of the Earth's Health and Environment Campaigner Ian Illuminato, one of the report's authors. "Consumers must be aware that nanomaterials are being put into sunscreens with very little evidence about their safety and relative efficacy."

In 2007 Consumer Reports (published by Consumers Union) tested sunscreens containing nanomaterials and found no correlation between their presence and sun protection. Consumer Reports testing found neither nanoscale zinc nor titanium oxides provide a clear and consistent performance advantage over other active ingredients. "Adding nanoparticles to sunscreens means adding an unnecessary potential risk to our health and to the environment, with no significant gain. Why take the chance?" asked Michael Hansen, PhD, co-author of the report and senior scientist at Consumers Union.

Studies have raised red flags about the environmental impacts that may stem from the release of nanomaterials into broader ecosystems. Once released into the environment, many nanomaterials may persist and accumulate as pollutants in air, soil or water. A 2006 study demonstrated that some forms of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (popular ingredients in nano sunscreens) are toxic to algae and water fleas, especially after exposure to UV light. Algae and water fleas are a vital part of marine ecosystems.

"No labeling is required for any product that contains nanomaterials, including sunscreens," said George Kimbrell, Staff Attorney at ICTA. "Nor are nano sunscreens assessed and approved before being allowed on markets. We need the government to regulate these novel products, including requiring labeling if they are approved so that consumers can make informed choices about what they place on their bodies and their families."

Nanomaterials reflect a convergence of chemistry, physics, and engineering at the nanoscale to take advantage of unique physical properties associated with chemicals in this small size range. Nanoparticles are measured in nanometers (nm); one nanometer is billionth of a meter. One nanometer is roughly 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair.

The report can be viewed at www.foe.org/nano-sunscreens-not-worth-risk.

####

About Friends of the Earth
Friends of the Earth and our network of grassroots groups in 77 countries fight to create a more healthy, just world. We're hard-hitting, progressive environmental advocates who pull no punches and speak sometimes uncomfortable truth to power. It's an approach that has worked for four decades to produce important victories protecting our planet and its people. Our current campaigns focus on clean energy and solutions to global warming, protecting people from toxic and new, potentially harmful technologies, and promoting smarter, low-pollution transportation alternatives.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ian Illuminato
Friends of the Earth
250-478-7135


George Kimbrell
International Center for Technology Assessment
571-527-8618


Michael Hansen
Consumers Union
914-378-2452

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