Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Building nanomaterials for next-generation computing: Scientists recently developed a blueprint to fabricate new nanoheterostructures using 2D materials

Nanoscientists at Northwestern University have developed a blueprint to fabricate new heterostructures from different types of 2-D materials. The researchers describe their blueprint in the Journal of Applied Physics. In this image: Top: Vertical MoSe2-WSe2 heterostructure, radial MoS2-WS2 heterostructure, hybrid MoS2-WS2 heterostructure and Mose2-WSe2 alloy building block representations and crystal structure models Bottom: Vertical MoSe2-WSe2 heterostructure crystal structure model
CREDIT
Cain, Hanson and Dravid
Nanoscientists at Northwestern University have developed a blueprint to fabricate new heterostructures from different types of 2-D materials. The researchers describe their blueprint in the Journal of Applied Physics. In this image: Top: Vertical MoSe2-WSe2 heterostructure, radial MoS2-WS2 heterostructure, hybrid MoS2-WS2 heterostructure and Mose2-WSe2 alloy building block representations and crystal structure models Bottom: Vertical MoSe2-WSe2 heterostructure crystal structure model CREDIT Cain, Hanson and Dravid

Abstract:
Nanoscientists at Northwestern University have developed a blueprint to fabricate new heterostructures from different types of 2-D materials. 2-D materials are single atom layers that can be stacked together like "nano-interlocking building blocks." Materials scientists and physicists are excited about the properties of 2-D materials and their potential applications. The researchers describe their blueprint in the Journal of Applied Physics, from AIP Publishing.

Building nanomaterials for next-generation computing: Scientists recently developed a blueprint to fabricate new nanoheterostructures using 2D materials

Washington, DC | Posted on June 1st, 2018

"We've outlined an easy, deterministic and readily deployable way to stack and stitch these individual layers into orders not seen in nature," said Jeffrey Cain, an author on the paper who was formerly at Northwestern University but is now at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California.

Cain explained that for nanoscientists, "the dream" is to combine 2-D materials in any order and collate a library of these heterostructures with their documented properties. Scientists can then select appropriate heterostructures from the library for their desired applications. For instance, the computer industry is trying to make transistors smaller and faster to increase computing power. A nanoscale semiconductor with favorable electronic properties could be used to make transistors in next-generation computers.

So far, nanoscientists have lacked clear methods for fabricating heterostructures, and have not yet been able to develop this library. In this work, the scientists looked to solve these fabrication issues. After identifying trends in the literature, they tested different conditions to map out the different parameters required to grow specific heterostructures from four types of 2-D materials: molybdenum disulfide and diselenide, and tungsten disulfide and diselenide. To fully characterize the atomically thin final products, the scientists used microscopy and spectrometry techniques.

The group was inspired by the science of time-temperature-transformation diagrams in classical materials, which maps out heating and cooling profiles to generate precise metallic microstructures. Based on this method, the researchers packaged their findings into one diagrammatic technique -- the Time-Temperature-Architecture Diagram.

"People had previously written papers for specific morphologies, but we have unified it all and enabled the generation of these morphologies with one technique," Cain said.

The unified Time-Temperature-Architecture Diagrams provide directions for the exact conditions required to generate numerous heterostructure morphologies and compositions. Using these diagrams, the researchers developed a unique library of nanostructures with physical properties of interest to physicists and materials scientists. The Northwestern University scientists are now examining the behaviors displayed by some materials in their library, like the electron flow across the stitched junctions between materials.

The researchers hope that their blueprint design will be useful for heterostructure fabrication beyond the first four materials. "Our specific diagrams would need revisions in the context of each new material, but we think that this idea is applicable and extendable to other material systems," Cain said.

####

About American Institute of Physics
Journal of Applied Physics is an influential international journal publishing significant new experimental and theoretical results of applied physics research. See http://jap.aip.org .

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Julia Majors

301-209-3090

Copyright © American Institute of Physics

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

The article, "Controlled synthesis of 2D MX2 (M=Mo, W; X=S, Se) heterostructures and alloys," is written by Jeffrey D. Cain, Eve D. Hanson and Vinayak P. Dravid. The article appeared in the Journal of Applied Physics May 29, 2018, (DOI: 10.1063/1.5025710) and can be accessed at :

Related News Press

News and information

Bosch Sensortec launches ideation community to foster and accelerate innovative IoT applications : Creativity hub for customers, partners, developers and makers February 18th, 2019

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Picosunís ALD encapsulation prevents electronics degradation February 15th, 2019

Hardware

Picosunís ALD encapsulation prevents electronics degradation February 15th, 2019

2 Dimensional Materials

Scientists image conducting edges in a promising 2-D material February 8th, 2019

Large, stable pieces of graphene produced with unique edge pattern: Breakthrough in graphene research February 1st, 2019

Shelley Claridge, an assistant professor at Purdue University, is leading research to improve electronic and energy conversion devices. (Image by Vincent Walter) January 24th, 2019

Laboratories

Helping smartphones hold their charge longer February 6th, 2019

Platinum forms nano-bubbles: Technologically important noble metal oxidises more readily than expected January 28th, 2019

Possible Futures

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Molecular Lego blocks: Chemical data mining boosts search for new organic semiconductors February 15th, 2019

Chip Technology

NRL, AFRL develop direct-write quantum calligraphy in monolayer semiconductors February 15th, 2019

Molecular Lego blocks: Chemical data mining boosts search for new organic semiconductors February 15th, 2019

Spintronics by 'straintronics': Switching superferromagnetism with electric-field induced strain February 15th, 2019

Picosunís ALD encapsulation prevents electronics degradation February 15th, 2019

Nanoelectronics

Large, stable pieces of graphene produced with unique edge pattern: Breakthrough in graphene research February 1st, 2019

Kiel physicists discover new effect in the interaction of plasmas with solids January 18th, 2019

Study on low noise, high-performance transistors may bring innovations in electronics December 28th, 2018

The feature size and functional range of molecular electronic devices: Monitoring the transition from tunneling leakage current to molecular tunneling December 16th, 2018

Materials/Metamaterials

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Laser-induced graphene gets tough, with help: Rice University lab combines conductive foam with other materials for capable new composites February 12th, 2019

Using artificial intelligence to engineer materials' properties: New system of 'strain engineering' can change a material's optical, electrical, and thermal properties February 11th, 2019

Sound and light trapped by disorder February 8th, 2019

Announcements

Bosch Sensortec launches ideation community to foster and accelerate innovative IoT applications : Creativity hub for customers, partners, developers and makers February 18th, 2019

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Tracking pollen with quantum dots: A pollination biologist from Stellenbosch University in South Africa is using quantum dots to track the fate of individual pollen grains. This is breaking new ground in a field of research that has been hampered by the lack of a universal method February 17th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Researchers create ultra-lightweight ceramic material that withstands extreme temperatures: UCLA-led team develops highly durable aerogel that could ultimately be an upgrade for insulation on spacecraft February 15th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project