Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > HKUST researchers develop a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V and silicon

High-performance Si-waveguide coupled III-V photodetectors grown on SOI

CREDIT
Credit: The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
High-performance Si-waveguide coupled III-V photodetectors grown on SOI CREDIT Credit: The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Abstract:
Researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has recently developed a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V compound semiconductor devices and silicon components on silicon photonics (Si-photonics) platform by selective direct epitaxy, unlocking the potential of integrating energy-efficient photonics with cost-effective electronics, as well as enabling the next generation telecommunications with low cost, high speed and large capacity.

HKUST researchers develop a novel integration scheme for efficient coupling between III-V and silicon

Hong Kong, China | Posted on November 18th, 2022

Over the past few years, data traffic has been growing exponentially driven by various applications and emerging techniques such as big data, automobiles, cloud applications and sensors. To address the issues, Si-photonics has been widely investigated as a core technology to enable, extend, and increase data transmission through energy-efficient, high-capacity and low-cost optical interconnects. While silicon-based passive components have been well established on Si-photonics platform, the lasers and photodetectors can’t be realized by silicon and necessitate the integration of other materials such as III-V compound semiconductors on silicon.

III-V lasers and photodetectors on silicon has been investigated by two main methods. The first one is the bonding-based method which has yielded devices with impressive performance. However, it requires complicated manufacturing technique that is low yield and high-cost, making mass production very challenging. The other way is direct epitaxy method by growing multiple layers of III-V on silicon. While it provides a solution with lower cost, larger scalability and higher integration density, the micrometers thick III-V buffer layers which are crucial for this method hinders efficient light coupling between III-V and silicon - the key for integrated Si-photonics.

To address these issues, the team led by Prof. Kei-May LAU, Professor Emeritus of the Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), developed lateral aspect ratio trapping (LART) - a novel selective direct epitaxy method that can selectively grow III-V materials on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) in a lateral direction without the need of thick buffers. Furthermore, based on this novel technology, the team devised and demonstrated unique in-plane integration of III-V photodetectors and silicon elements with high coupling efficiency between III-V and silicon. Compared to the commercial ones, the performance of photodetectors by such approach is less noisy, more sensitive, and has wider operation range, with record-high speed of over 112 Gb/s – way faster than existing products. For the first time, the III-V devices can be efficiently coupled with Si elements by direct epitaxy. The integration strategy can be easily applied to the integration of various III-V devices and Si-based components, thereby enabling the ultimate goal of integrating photonics with electronics on silicon photonics platform for data communications.

“This was made possible by our latest development of a novel growth technique named lateral aspect ratio trapping (LART) and our unique design of coupling strategy on the SOI platform. Our team’s combined expertise and insights into both device physics and growth mechanisms allow us to accomplish the challenging task of efficient coupling between III-V and Si and cross-correlated analysis of epitaxial growth and device performance,” said Prof. Lau.
“This work will provide practical solutions for photonic integrated circuits and fully integrated Si-photonics, light coupling between III-V lasers and Si components can be realized through this method” said Dr. Ying Xue, first author of the study.

This is a collaborative work with a research team led by Prof. Hon Ki Tsang of Department of Electronic Engineering at Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) and a research team led by Prof. Xinlun Cai of School of Electronics and Information Technology at Sun Yat-sen University (SYSU). The device fabrication technology in the work was developed at HKUST’s Nanosystem Fabrication Facility (NFF) on Clear Water Bay campus. The work is supported by Research Grants Council of Hong Kong and Innovation Technology Fund of Hong Kong. This work has recently been published in Optica.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Chun-ki WONG
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Office: 852-346-92512

Copyright © Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

ARTICLE TITLE

Related News Press

News and information

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

UCF researcher receives Samsung International Global Research Outreach Award: The award from the multinational electronics corporation will fund the development of infrared night vision and thermal sensing camera technology for cell phones and consumer electronics January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Wireless/telecommunications/RF/Antennas/Microwaves

Researchers demonstrate co-propagation of quantum and classical signals: Study shows that quantum encryption can be implemented in existing fiber networks January 20th, 2023

Synthesis of air-stable room-temperature van der Waals magnetic thin flakes September 30th, 2022

Quantum network nodes with warm atoms June 24th, 2022

Photonic integrated erbium doped amplifiers reach commercial performance: Boosting light power revolutionizes communications and autopilots June 17th, 2022

Possible Futures

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Danish quantum physicists make nanoscopic advance of colossal significance January 27th, 2023

UC Irvine researchers decipher atomic-scale imperfections in lithium-ion batteries: Team used super high-resolution microscopy enhanced by deep machine learning January 27th, 2023

Discoveries

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Announcements

UCF researcher receives Samsung International Global Research Outreach Award: The award from the multinational electronics corporation will fund the development of infrared night vision and thermal sensing camera technology for cell phones and consumer electronics January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Quantum sensors see Weyl photocurrents flow: Boston College-led team develops new quantum sensor technique to image and understand the origin of photocurrent flow in Weyl semimetals January 27th, 2023

Department of Energy announces $9.1 million for research on quantum information science and nuclear physics: Projects span the development of quantum computing, algorithms, simulators, superconducting qubits, and quantum sensors for advancing nuclear physics January 27th, 2023

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Quantum sensors see Weyl photocurrents flow: Boston College-led team develops new quantum sensor technique to image and understand the origin of photocurrent flow in Weyl semimetals January 27th, 2023

Danish quantum physicists make nanoscopic advance of colossal significance January 27th, 2023

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Quantum sensors see Weyl photocurrents flow: Boston College-led team develops new quantum sensor technique to image and understand the origin of photocurrent flow in Weyl semimetals January 27th, 2023

Manufacturing advances bring material back in vogue January 20th, 2023

Researchers demonstrate co-propagation of quantum and classical signals: Study shows that quantum encryption can be implemented in existing fiber networks January 20th, 2023

Experimental nanosheet material marks a step toward the next generation of low-power, high-performance electronics December 9th, 2022

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project