Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Oregon scientists create mechanism to precisely control soundwaves in metamaterials: Theoretical modeling shows that designer materials incorporating drum-like membranes allow precise stoppage and reversal of sound pulses

Abstract:
University of Oregon physicists have developed a new method to manipulate sound -- stop it, reverse it, store it and even use it later -- in synthetic composite structures known as metamaterials.

Oregon scientists create mechanism to precisely control soundwaves in metamaterials: Theoretical modeling shows that designer materials incorporating drum-like membranes allow precise stoppage and reversal of sound pulses

Eugene, OR | Posted on April 16th, 2021

The discovery was made using theoretical and computational analysis of the mechanical vibrations of thin elastic plates, which serve as the building blocks for the proposed design. The physicists, Pragalv Karki and Jayson Paulose, also developed a simpler minimal model consisting of springs and masses demonstrating the same signal manipulation ability.

"There have been a lot of mechanisms that can guide or block the transmission of sound waves through a metamaterial, but our design is the first to dynamically stop and reverse a sound pulse," said Karki, a postdoctoral researcher in the UO's Department of Physics and Institute for Fundamental Science.

The interplay between bending stiffness and the global tension --two physical parameters governing sound transmission in thin plates--is at the heart of their signal-manipulation mechanism. While bending stiffness is a material property, global tension is an externally controllable parameter in their system.

Karki and Paulose, an assistant professor of physics and member of the Institute for Fundamental Science, described their new mechanism, which they call dynamic dispersion tuning, in a paper published online March 29 in the journal Physical Review Applied.

"If you throw a stone onto a pond, you see the ripples," Karki said. "But what if you threw the stone and instead of seeing ripples propagating outward you just see the displacement of the water going up and down at the point of impact? That's similar to what happens in our system."

The ability to manipulate sound, light or any other waves in artificially made metamaterials is an active area of research, Karki said.

Optical or photonic metamaterials, which exhibit properties such as a negative refractive index not possible with conventional materials, were initially developed to control light in ways that could be used to create invisibility cloaks and super lenses.

Their use is being explored in diverse applications such as aerospace and defense, consumer electronics, medical devices and energy harvesting.

Acoustic metamaterials are usually static and unchangeable once produced, and dynamically tuning their properties is an ongoing challenge, Karki said. Other research groups have proposed several strategies for tuning acoustic transmission, ranging from origami-inspired designs to magnetic switching.

"In our case, the tunability comes from the ability to change the tension of the drum-like membranes in real time," Karki said.

Additional inspiration, Karki and Paulose noted, came from research in the UO lab of physicist Benjamín Alemán. In Nature Communications in 2019, Alemán's group unveiled a graphene nanomechanical bolometer, a drum-like membrane that can detect colors of light at high speeds and high temperatures. The approach exploits a change in global tension.

While the mechanism in the new paper was identified theoretically and needs to be proven in lab experiments, Karki said, he is confident the approach will work.

"Our mechanism of dynamic dispersion tuning is independent of whether you are using acoustic, light or electronic waves," Karki said. "This opens up the possibility of manipulating signals in photonic and electronic systems as well."

Possibilities, he said, include improved acoustic signal processing and computation. Designing acoustic metamaterials based on graphene, such as those developed in Alemán's lab, could lead to variety of uses like wave-based computing, micromechanical transistors and logic devices, waveguides and ultra-sensitive sensors.

"Our design could be built at the microscale with graphene and at large scales using drum-like membrane sheets," Karki said. "You strike the chain of drums, creating a particular pattern of sound that moves in one direction, but by tuning the tension of the drums, we can stop the sound and store it for future use. It can be reversed or manipulated into any number of other patterns."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Jim Barlow

541-346-3481

@uoregon

Copyright © Theoretical modeling shows that designer materials incorporating drum-like membranes allow precise s

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Paper:

Related News Press

News and information

Hanging by a thread: Imaging and probing chains of single atoms: Scientists develop a method to visualize monoatomic chains and measure the strength and conductance of single-atom bonds May 14th, 2021

Nanophotonics enhanced coverslip for phase imaging in biology May 14th, 2021

New technology enables rapid sequencing of entire genomes of plant pathogens May 14th, 2021

Harvesting light like nature does:Synthesizing a new class of bio-inspired, light-capturing nanomaterials May 14th, 2021

Graphene/ Graphite

Graphene key for novel hardware security May 10th, 2021

Better metric for thermoelectric materials means better design strategies: New quantity helps experimentally classify dimensionality of thermoelectric materials April 15th, 2021

Better metric for thermoelectric materials means better design strategies: New quantity helps experimentally classify dimensionality of thermoelectric materials April 15th, 2021

Graphene: Everything under control: Research team demonstrates control mechanism for quantum material April 9th, 2021

Possible Futures

Emergence of a new heteronanostructure library May 14th, 2021

New technology enables rapid sequencing of entire genomes of plant pathogens May 14th, 2021

Harvesting light like nature does:Synthesizing a new class of bio-inspired, light-capturing nanomaterials May 14th, 2021

You're so vein: Scientists discover faster way to manufacture vascular materials May 14th, 2021

Discoveries

Emergence of a new heteronanostructure library May 14th, 2021

Hanging by a thread: Imaging and probing chains of single atoms: Scientists develop a method to visualize monoatomic chains and measure the strength and conductance of single-atom bonds May 14th, 2021

Nanophotonics enhanced coverslip for phase imaging in biology May 14th, 2021

You're so vein: Scientists discover faster way to manufacture vascular materials May 14th, 2021

Materials/Metamaterials

Silver ions hurry up, then wait as they disperse: Rice chemists show ions’ staged release from gold-silver nanoparticles could be useful property April 23rd, 2021

Synthetic gelatin-like material mimics lobster underbelly’s stretch and strength: The membrane’s structure could provide a blueprint for robust artificial tissues April 23rd, 2021

FSU engineers improve performance of high-temperature superconductor wires April 16th, 2021

Better metric for thermoelectric materials means better design strategies: New quantity helps experimentally classify dimensionality of thermoelectric materials April 15th, 2021

Announcements

Emergence of a new heteronanostructure library May 14th, 2021

Nanophotonics enhanced coverslip for phase imaging in biology May 14th, 2021

New technology enables rapid sequencing of entire genomes of plant pathogens May 14th, 2021

Harvesting light like nature does:Synthesizing a new class of bio-inspired, light-capturing nanomaterials May 14th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Hanging by a thread: Imaging and probing chains of single atoms: Scientists develop a method to visualize monoatomic chains and measure the strength and conductance of single-atom bonds May 14th, 2021

Nanophotonics enhanced coverslip for phase imaging in biology May 14th, 2021

New technology enables rapid sequencing of entire genomes of plant pathogens May 14th, 2021

Harvesting light like nature does:Synthesizing a new class of bio-inspired, light-capturing nanomaterials May 14th, 2021

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project