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Home > News > GlobalFoundries CTO on Why the Company Abandoned the “Bleeding Edge”

September 1st, 2018

GlobalFoundries CTO on Why the Company Abandoned the “Bleeding Edge”

Abstract:
Earlier this week, GlobalFoundries announced that it was halting development of its 7-nanometer manufacturing technology, effectively ending its climb toward the limits of Moore’s Law.

When IEEE Spectrum met the company’s CTO Gary Patton in October 2017, he was driving the move the 7-nm node at the Fab 8 facility in Malta, N.Y. He was optimistic, but described the process as “an extreme sport.” That month GlobalFoundries was in the midst of installing the first of what would be two extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) systems, machines that would reduce the cost of 7-nm processes and enable 5- and 3-nm processes in the future.

Source:
spectrum.ieee.org

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