Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Five atoms for good contact

Graphical depiction of a copper tip with a carbon molecule (C60) attached to the end. The molecule is hovering over a metal surface on which there are five contacts which have been constructed atom by atom. Image: Schull
Graphical depiction of a copper tip with a carbon molecule (C60) attached to the end. The molecule is hovering over a metal surface on which there are five contacts which have been constructed atom by atom. Image: Schull

Abstract:
A team of scientists headed by Kiel University physicist studies molecules as conductors

Five atoms for good contact

Kiel, Germany | Posted on November 26th, 2010

An international research group under the leadership of Kiel physicist, Richard Berndt, has answered two of the key issues in molecular electronics, namely, how contact to an individual molecule can be created in a controlled manner, and how the type of contact can affect the electronic characteristics. The researchers from Germany, France and Spain published their findings 14 November 2010, in the online advance edition of Nature Nanotechnology.

The physicists constructed a row of contact areas, each consisting of only a few atoms, on a copper surface. They used a pointed copper tip to introduce a single carbon molecule (C60) to every one of these ultra small contacts and determined the electrical resistance of each. "Initially, the connection between the molecule and the surface consisted of just one single atom", explained Dr. Guillaume Schull, who until recently used to carry out research at Kiel University (Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel (CAU)). "By gradually increasing the number of contact atoms, the electricity conducted through the molecule could be multiplied more than tenfold for the time being." In the case of the C60-molecules, however, this positive trend reached a limit: "As from five contact atoms, the molecule itself starts to act as a bottleneck for the electricity flow", according to Professor Berndt.

While molecular machines exist for almost every technical function imaginable in living nature, the corresponding technology is still in its infancy. Methods have been sought for many years on how to build electrical switches from individual molecules, which could enable electronic components to become even smaller in the future. The research findings should help to better understand the characteristics and processes on the single molecule scale. The knowledge of conductible molecules will be incorporated in the development of electronic components based on organic materials.

Kiel University (CAU) has proven international expertise as a North German research university in the field of Nanoscience. The members of the Collaborative Research Centre 677 "Function by Switching", of which Professor Berndt is also a member, study the field of molecular nanoscience. Furthermore, the CAU is applying for the current round of the Excellence Initiative with the nanoscience cluster of "Materials for Life". Within the framework of the cluster, Kiel scientists wish to research new, intelligent materials for medical therapy.

Original publication:

G. Schull, Th. Frederiksen, A. Arnau, D. Sanchez, R. Berndt: Atomic-scale engineering of electrodes for single-molecule contacts.

Nature Nanotechnology 2010, DOI: 10.1038/NNANO.2010.215

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Prof. Dr. Richard Berndt
Kiel University, Institute of Experimental and Applied Sciences
Tel.: +49(0)431/880-3946 or -2478

Copyright © University of Kiel

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

First human trial shows ‘wonder’ material can be developed safely: A revolutionary nanomaterial with huge potential to tackle multiple global challenges could be developed further without acute risk to human health, research suggests February 16th, 2024

Detecting breast cancer through a spit test February 16th, 2024

New chip opens door to AI computing at light speed February 16th, 2024

HKUST researchers develop new integration technique for efficient coupling of III-V and silicon February 16th, 2024

Possible Futures

First human trial shows ‘wonder’ material can be developed safely: A revolutionary nanomaterial with huge potential to tackle multiple global challenges could be developed further without acute risk to human health, research suggests February 16th, 2024

Detecting breast cancer through a spit test February 16th, 2024

A battery’s hopping ions remember where they’ve been: Seen in atomic detail, the seemingly smooth flow of ions through a battery’s electrolyte is surprisingly complicated February 16th, 2024

NRL discovers two-dimensional waveguides February 16th, 2024

Academic/Education

Rice University launches Rice Synthetic Biology Institute to improve lives January 12th, 2024

Multi-institution, $4.6 million NSF grant to fund nanotechnology training September 9th, 2022

National Space Society Helps Fund Expanding Frontier’s Brownsville Summer Entrepreneur Academy: National Space Society and Club for the Future to Support Youth Development Program in South Texas June 24th, 2022

How a physicist aims to reduce the noise in quantum computing: NAU assistant professor Ryan Behunin received an NSF CAREER grant to study how to reduce the noise produced in the process of quantum computing, which will make it better and more practical April 1st, 2022

Molecular Machines

First electric nanomotor made from DNA material: Synthetic rotary motors at the nanoscale perform mechanical work July 22nd, 2022

Nanotech scientists create world's smallest origami bird March 17th, 2021

Controlling the speed of enzyme motors brings biomedical applications of nanorobots closer: Recent advances in this field have made micro- and nanomotors promising devices for solving many biomedical problems October 13th, 2020

Giant nanomachine aids the immune system: Theoretical chemistry August 28th, 2020

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods/Nanostrings

Catalytic combo converts CO2 to solid carbon nanofibers: Tandem electrocatalytic-thermocatalytic conversion could help offset emissions of potent greenhouse gas by locking carbon away in a useful material January 12th, 2024

TU Delft researchers discover new ultra strong material for microchip sensors: A material that doesn't just rival the strength of diamonds and graphene, but boasts a yield strength 10 times greater than Kevlar, renowned for its use in bulletproof vests November 3rd, 2023

Tests find no free-standing nanotubes released from tire tread wear September 8th, 2023

Detection of bacteria and viruses with fluorescent nanotubes July 21st, 2023

Nanoelectronics

Interdisciplinary: Rice team tackles the future of semiconductors Multiferroics could be the key to ultralow-energy computing October 6th, 2023

Key element for a scalable quantum computer: Physicists from Forschungszentrum Jülich and RWTH Aachen University demonstrate electron transport on a quantum chip September 23rd, 2022

Reduced power consumption in semiconductor devices September 23rd, 2022

Atomic level deposition to extend Moore’s law and beyond July 15th, 2022

Announcements

Detecting breast cancer through a spit test February 16th, 2024

New chip opens door to AI computing at light speed February 16th, 2024

HKUST researchers develop new integration technique for efficient coupling of III-V and silicon February 16th, 2024

Electrons screen against conductivity-killer in organic semiconductors: The discovery is the first step towards creating effective organic semiconductors, which use significantly less water and energy, and produce far less waste than their inorganic counterparts February 16th, 2024

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project