Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > DNA origami to scale-up molecular motors

Mixing DNA-modified microtubules, DNA origami and kinesin linkers leads to star-like formations of microtubules that are connected by kinesin linkers. This network contracted dynamically when ATP energy was added. 
(Matsuda K. et al., Nano Letters, April 30, 2019)
Mixing DNA-modified microtubules, DNA origami and kinesin linkers leads to star-like formations of microtubules that are connected by kinesin linkers. This network contracted dynamically when ATP energy was added. (Matsuda K. et al., Nano Letters, April 30, 2019)

Abstract:
Researchers have successfully used DNA origami to make smooth-muscle-like contractions in large networks of molecular motor systems, a discovery which could be applied in molecular robotics.

DNA origami to scale-up molecular motors

Tokyo, Japan | Posted on June 13th, 2019

"We successfully demonstrated programmed self-assembly of a biomolecular motor system," write the researchers from Japan and Germany who conducted the study.

The biomolecular motor system, consisting of fibrous microtubules and motor protein kinesins, plays an essential role in cellular transportation systems. Scientists believe they can utilize the motors in molecular robotics but it remains difficult to assemble a larger system from the tiny molecules.

In the current study published in Nano Letters, the research team including Akira Kakugo of Hokkaido University, Akinori Kuzuya of Kansai University, and Akihiko Konagaya of Tokyo Institute of Technology developed a system combining DNA origami and microtubules. The DNA origami were formed from six DNA helices bundled together. Mixing the two components caused the microtubules to self-assemble around the DNA origami forming star-shaped structures. This self-assembly was made possible by the binding of complementary DNA strands attached to each component.

The team then designed a "kinesin linker" which is made of four kinesin motor proteins radiating from a central core protein. These kinesin linkers joined the microtubules together, causing multiple star-like assemblies to connect, forming a much larger hierarchical network.

When adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a molecule which stores and carries energy, was added to the system, the kinesin linkers moved, causing the microtubular network to dynamically contract within a matter of minutes. This resembled the contraction of smooth muscles according to the researchers.

This dynamic contraction only happened when the DNA origami were present, suggesting the importance of the hierarchical assembly within the microtubular network. "Further studies could lead to the use of DNA for controlled, programmable self-assembly and contraction of biomolecular motors. Such motors could find applications in molecular robotics and the development of microvalves for microfluidic devices," says Akira Kakugo.

Reference

Authors :
Kento Matsuda1, Arif Md. Rashedul Kabir2, Naohide Akamatsu3, Ai Saito1, Shumpei Ishikawa3, Tsuyoshi Matsuyama3, Oliver Ditzer4, Md. Sirajul Islam5, Yuichi Ohya3,5, Kazuki Sada1,2, Akihiko Konagaya6, Akinori Kuzuya3,5,*, and Akira Kakugo1,2,*
Title of original paper :
Artificial Smooth Muscle Model Composed of Hierarchically Ordered Microtubule Asters Mediated by DNA Origami Nanostructures.
Journal :
Nano Letters
DOI :
10.1021/acs.nanolett.9b01201 outer
Affiliations :
1Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University

2Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University

3Department of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Kansai University

4Faculty of Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Technische Universität Dresden

5Organization for Research and Development of Innovative Science and Technology, Kansai University

6Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Further Information

Professor Akihiko Konagaya

School of Computing, Tokyo Institute of Technology

Email
Tel +81-45-924-5655

Contact

Public Relations Section, Tokyo Institute of Technology

Email
Tel +81-3-5734-2975

*Corresponding authors' email:

Copyright © Tokyo Institute of Technology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nanometrics to Announce Second Quarter Financial Results on July 30, 2019 July 17th, 2019

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

NUS ‘smart’ textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times: Metamaterials are incorporated into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between electronic devices, allowing for new applications July 15th, 2019

An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries July 12th, 2019

Videos/Movies

NUS ‘smart’ textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times: Metamaterials are incorporated into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between electronic devices, allowing for new applications July 15th, 2019

3D body mapping could identify, treat organs, cells damaged from medical conditions June 27th, 2019

'Hot spots' increase efficiency of solar desalination: Rice University engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50% June 19th, 2019

New Video Highlights Specific Topics Sought in Call for Papers for the 2019 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) June 13th, 2019

Robotics

Sheaths drive powerful new artificial muscles July 11th, 2019

Possible Futures

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

Dresden physicists use nanostructures to free photons for highly efficient white OLEDs: Trapped light particles July 12th, 2019

Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries July 12th, 2019

Molecular Machines

Big energy savings for tiny machines May 24th, 2019

Kanazawa University research: A closed cage-like molecule that can be opened January 22nd, 2019

Insights into magnetic bacteria may guide research into medical nanorobots December 12th, 2018

How to mass produce cell-sized robots: Technique from MIT could lead to tiny, self-powered devices for environmental, industrial, or medical monitoring October 24th, 2018

Molecular Nanotechnology

Big energy savings for tiny machines May 24th, 2019

2D gold quantum dots are atomically tunable with nanotubes April 11th, 2019

The feature size and functional range of molecular electronic devices: Monitoring the transition from tunneling leakage current to molecular tunneling December 16th, 2018

Insights into magnetic bacteria may guide research into medical nanorobots December 12th, 2018

Self Assembly

A new way of making complex structures in thin films: Self-assembling materials can form patterns that might be useful in optical devices July 5th, 2019

University of Konstanz researchers create uniform-shape polymer nanocrystals: Researchers from the University of Konstanz's CRC 1214 'Anisotropic Particles as Building Blocks: Tailoring Shape, Interactions and Structures' generate uniform-shape nanocrystals using direct polymeriz June 14th, 2019

Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials April 19th, 2019

Can a flowing liquid-like material maintain its structural order like crystals? February 27th, 2019

Discoveries

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

NUS ‘smart’ textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times: Metamaterials are incorporated into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between electronic devices, allowing for new applications July 15th, 2019

Strange warping geometry helps to push scientific boundaries July 12th, 2019

Announcements

Nanometrics to Announce Second Quarter Financial Results on July 30, 2019 July 17th, 2019

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

NUS ‘smart’ textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times: Metamaterials are incorporated into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between electronic devices, allowing for new applications July 15th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Breakthrough material could lead to cheaper, more widespread solar panels and electronics July 16th, 2019

Caught in the act: Images capture molecular motions in real time July 15th, 2019

NUS ‘smart’ textiles boost connectivity between wearable sensors by 1,000 times: Metamaterials are incorporated into conventional clothing to dramatically improve signal strength between electronic devices, allowing for new applications July 15th, 2019

An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries July 12th, 2019

Nanobiotechnology

An 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries July 12th, 2019

Nanotechnology delivers hepatitis B vaccine: X-ray imaging shows that nanostructured silica acts as a protective vehicle to deliver intact antigen to the intestine so that it can trigger an immune response. The material can give rise to a polyvaccine against six diseases July 12th, 2019

Nanotechnology pioneer Chad Mirkin wins Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine: Molly Stevens of Imperial College London receives Kabiller Young Investigator Award July 11th, 2019

Imprinted spheres fight breast cancer: Inhibition of HER2 on tumor cells by molecularly imprinted nanoparticles July 9th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project