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Home > Press > Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copper: Rice University researchers show their flexible fibers work well but weigh much less

Rice University graduate student Amram Bengio prepares a sample nanotube fiber antenna for evaluation. The fibers had to be isolated in Styrofoam mounts to assure accurate comparisons with each other and with copper. The Rice fibers made only of carbon nanotubes may be practical antennas for aerospace applications and wearable electronics. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)
Rice University graduate student Amram Bengio prepares a sample nanotube fiber antenna for evaluation. The fibers had to be isolated in Styrofoam mounts to assure accurate comparisons with each other and with copper. The Rice fibers made only of carbon nanotubes may be practical antennas for aerospace applications and wearable electronics. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)

Abstract:
Fibers made of carbon nanotubes configured as wireless antennas can be as good as copper antennas but 20 times lighter, according to Rice University researchers. The antennas may offer practical advantages for aerospace applications and wearable electronics where weight and flexibility are factors.

Nanotube fiber antennas as capable as copper: Rice University researchers show their flexible fibers work well but weigh much less

Houston, TX | Posted on October 23rd, 2017

The research appears in Applied Physics Letters.

The discovery offers more potential applications for the strong, lightweight nanotube fibers developed by the Rice lab of chemist and chemical engineer Matteo Pasquali. The lab introduced the first practical method for making high-conductivity carbon nanotube fibers in 2013 and has since tested them for use as brain implants and in heart surgeries, among other applications.

The research could help engineers who seek to streamline materials for airplanes and spacecraft where weight equals cost. Increased interest in wearables like wrist-worn health monitors and clothing with embedded electronics could benefit from strong, flexible and conductive fiber antennas that send and receive signals, Pasquali said.

The Rice team and colleagues at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed a metric they called "specific radiation efficiency" to judge how well nanotube fibers radiated signals at the common wireless communication frequencies of 1 and 2.4 gigahertz and compared their results with standard copper antennas. They made thread comprising from eight to 128 fibers that are about as thin as a human hair and cut to the same length to test on a custom rig that made straightforward comparisons with copper practical.

"Antennas typically have a specific shape, and you have to design them very carefully," said Rice graduate student Amram Bengio, the paper's lead author. "Once they're in that shape, you want them to stay that way. So one of the first experimental challenges was getting our flexible material to stay put."

Contrary to earlier results by other labs (which used different carbon nanotube fiber sources), the Rice researchers found the fiber antennas matched copper for radiation efficiency at the same frequencies and diameters. Their results support theories that predicted the performance of nanotube antennas would scale with the density and conductivity of the fiber.

"Not only did we find that we got the same performance as copper for the same diameter and cross-sectional area, but once we took the weight into account, we found we're basically doing this for 1/20th the weight of copper wire," Bengio said.

"Applications for this material are a big selling point, but from a scientific perspective, at these frequencies carbon nanotube macro-materials behave like a typical conductor," he said. Even fibers considered "moderately conductive" showed superior performance, he said.

Although manufacturers could simply use thinner copper wires instead of the 30-gauge wires they currently use, those wires would be very fragile and difficult to handle, Pasquali said.

"Amram showed that if you do three things right -- make the right fibers, fabricate the antenna correctly and design the antenna according to telecommunication protocols -- then you get antennas that work fine," he said. "As you go to very thin antennas at high frequencies, you get less of a disadvantage compared with copper because copper becomes difficult to handle at thin gauges, whereas nanotubes, with their textile-like behavior, hold up pretty well."

Co-authors of the paper are, from Rice, graduate students Lauren Taylor and Peiyu Chen, alumnus Dmitri Tsentalovich and Aydin Babakhani, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, and, from NIST in Boulder, Colo., postdoctoral researcher Damir Senic, research engineer Christopher Holloway, physicist Christian Long, research scientists David Novotny and James Booth and physicist Nathan Orloff. Pasquali is a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, of materials science and nanoengineering and of chemistry.

The U.S. Air Force supported the research.

####

About Rice University
Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for quality of life and for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for happiest students by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview .

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Related Links

Read the abstract at DOI: 10.1063/1.4991822:

Nano-coating makes coaxial cables lighter:

Complex Flows of Complex Fluids (Pasquali group):

Matteo Pasquali bio:

Rice Department of Chemistry:

Rice Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering:

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