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Home > Press > Ualbany Nanocollege Establishes Its First Global Education And Research Partnerships In The Pacific Rim

Abstract:
Collaborations involve three of Japan's leading educational and technological institutions

Ualbany Nanocollege Establishes Its First Global Education And Research Partnerships In The Pacific Rim

Albany, NY | Posted on November 16th, 2010

The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering ("CNSE") of the University at Albany today announced the establishment of partnerships with a trio of Japan's leading educational and technological institutions, marking the UAlbany NanoCollege's first formal collaborations in nanoscale education, research and development, and commercialization in the Pacific Rim.

Joint programs are now underway between CNSE and Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology ("AIST"), National Institute for Materials Science ("NIMS"), and the University of Tsukuba. The partnerships will feature academic exchanges and joint research initiatives concentrated in six core areas: nanoelectronics, power electronics, nano-MEMS, nano-material safety, carbon nanotubes, and green innovations driven by nanotechnology.

Both faculty and students at CNSE will have the opportunity to conduct research and engage in educational programs through intensive summer courses at AIST, NIMS and the University of Tsukuba. At the same time, faculty and students at the University of Tsukuba, as well as leading researchers at AIST and NIMS, will work collaboratively with the top innovative minds in the academic and industrial worlds at CNSE's Albany NanoTech Complex, a $6.5 billion megaplex that is the most advanced in the academic world.

Dr. Alain E. Kaloyeros, Senior Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of CNSE, said, "The UAlbany NanoCollege is pleased to establish its first educational and technological partnerships in the Pacific Rim through these exciting collaborations with three of Japan's leading institutions. These pioneering initiatives provide a platform to advance critical research and enable unique educational experiences, while offering new opportunities to build strategic global partnerships for the benefit of each participant and the nanoelectronics industry."

Dr. Makoto Hirayama, Associate Vice President for Asian and Pacific Rim Strategic Alliances for CNSE, said, "We are delighted to begin collaborations with the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, the National Institute for Materials Science, and the University of Tsukaba. These important programs will support world-class education and leading-edge research that will be beneficial to each institution, while further building CNSE's global footprint in nanoscale education and innovation."

Tamotsu Nomakuchi, President of AIST, said, "This partnership with the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, a recognized global leader in nanotechnology, recognizes that a collaborative model is essential to fostering 21st century education and innovation. We look forward to working together to open up new opportunities for education and research that are essential to academic and industrial competitiveness."

Sukekatsu Ushioda, President of NIMS, said, "In collaborating with the world-class College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, we see an exciting opportunity to accelerate nanoscale technologies and help to develop the skilled workforce that is critical to our future success. We anticipate a cooperative and cohesive interaction that will utilize the unique capabilities of each institution to drive important and groundbreaking innovations."

Nobuhiro Yamada, President of the University of Tsukuba, said, "By participating in this unique collaborative educational and research partnership with the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering - the most advanced research complex at any university in the world - we look forward to building a strategic alliance that is essential for our future development and growth. We are excited about this new collaboration and look forward to a mutually beneficial partnership."

The collaborations grew out of a first-ever conference, the Joint Workshop on Advanced Materials Research for Nanotechnology, that took place at CNSE's Albany NanoTech Complex in December of 2009. The conference was designed to build strategic alliances and collaborative programs between CNSE and leading Japanese organizations to support and enhance the development of leading-edge nanoscale technologies. The 2nd annual event is being planned for February of 2011.

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About Ualbany Nanocollege
The UAlbany CNSE is the first college in the world dedicated to education, research, development, and deployment in the emerging disciplines of nanoscience, nanoengineering, nanobioscience, and nanoeconomics. CNSE’s Albany NanoTech Complex is the most advanced research enterprise of its kind at any university in the world. With over $6.5 billion in high-tech investments, the 800,000-square-foot complex attracts corporate partners from around the world and offers students a one-of-a-kind academic experience. The UAlbany NanoCollege houses the only fully-integrated, 300mm wafer, computer chip pilot prototyping and demonstration line within 80,000 square feet of Class 1 capable cleanrooms. More than 2,500 scientists, researchers, engineers, students, and faculty work on site, from companies including IBM, AMD, GlobalFoundries, SEMATECH, Toshiba, Applied Materials, Tokyo Electron, ASML, Novellus Systems, Vistec Lithography and Atotech. An expansion currently in the planning stages is projected to increase the size of CNSE’s Albany NanoTech Complex to over 1,250,000 square feet of next-generation infrastructure housing over 105,000 square feet of Class 1 capable cleanrooms and more than 3,750 scientists, researchers and engineers from CNSE and global corporations.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Steve Janack
CNSE Vice President for Marketing and Communications
(phone) 518-956-7322
(cell) 518-312-5009

Copyright © Ualbany Nanocollege

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