Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Led by Columbia Engineering, researchers build longest, highly conductive molecular nanowire: The 2.6nm-long single molecule wire has quasi-metallic properties and shows an unusual increase of conductance as the wire length increases; its excellent conductivity holds great promis

Top: the two-step oxidation of the bis(triarylamines) molecular series. Bottom: the geometry of the highest conducting trimer (n=3) molecule in the molecular junction. Red and blue regions are artistic depictions on the coupling between the two edge states.
CREDIT
Liang Li/Columbia University
Top: the two-step oxidation of the bis(triarylamines) molecular series. Bottom: the geometry of the highest conducting trimer (n=3) molecule in the molecular junction. Red and blue regions are artistic depictions on the coupling between the two edge states. CREDIT Liang Li/Columbia University

Abstract:
As our devices get smaller and smaller, the use of molecules as the main components in electronic circuitry is becoming ever more critical. Over the past 10 years, researchers have been trying to use single molecules as conducting wires because of their small scale, distinct electronic characteristics, and high tunability. But in most molecular wires, as the length of the wire increases, the efficiency by which electrons are transmitted across the wire decreases exponentially.This limitation has made it especially challenging to build a long molecular wire--one that is much longer than a nanometer--that actually conducts electricity well.

Led by Columbia Engineering, researchers build longest, highly conductive molecular nanowire: The 2.6nm-long single molecule wire has quasi-metallic properties and shows an unusual increase of conductance as the wire length increases; its excellent conductivity holds great promis

New York, NY | Posted on July 8th, 2022

Columbia researchers announced today that they have built a nanowire that is 2.6 nanometers long, shows an unusual increase in conductance as the wire length increases, and has quasi-metallic properties. Its excellent conductivity holds great promise for the field of molecular electronics, enabling electronic devices to become even tinier. The study is published today in Nature Chemistry.

Molecular wire designs

The team of researchers from Columbia Engineering and Columbia’s department of chemistry, together with theorists from Germany and synthetic chemists in China, explored molecular wire designs that would support unpaired electrons on either end, as such wires would form one-dimensional analogues to topological insulators (TI) that are highly conducting through their edges but insulating in the center.

While the simplest 1D TI is made of just carbon atoms where the terminal carbons support the radical states--unpaired electrons, these molecules are generally very unstable. Carbon does not like to have unpaired electrons. Replacing the terminal carbons, where the radicals are, with nitrogen increases the molecules’ stability. “This makes 1D TIs made with carbon chains but terminated with nitrogen much more stable and we can work with these at room temperature under ambient conditions,” said the team’s co-leader Latha Venkataraman, Lawrence Gussman Professor of Applied Physics and professor of chemistry.

Breaking the exponential-decay rule

Through a combination of chemical design and experiments, the group created a series of one-dimensional TIs and successfully broke the exponential-decay rule, a formula for the process of a quantity decreasing at a rate proportional to its current value. Using the two radical-edge states, the researchers generated a highly conducting pathway through the molecules and achieved a “reversed conductance decay,” i.e. a system that shows an increasing conductance with increasing wire length.

“What’s really exciting is that our wire had a conductance at the same scale as that of a gold metal-metal point contacts, suggesting that the molecule itself shows quasi-metallic properties,” Venkataraman said. “This work demonstrates that organic molecules can behave like metals at the single-molecule level in contrast to what had been done in the past where they were primarily weakly conducting.“

The researchers designed and synthesized a bis(triarylamines) molecular series, which exhibited properties of a one-dimensional TI by chemical oxidation. They made conductance measurements of single-molecule junctions where molecules were connected to both the source and drain electrodes. Through the measurements, the team showed that the longer molecules had a higher conductance, which worked until the wire was longer than 2.5 nanometers, the diameter of a strand of human DNA.

Laying the groundwork for more technological advancements in molecular electronics

“The Venkataraman lab is always seeking to understand the interplay of physics, chemistry, and engineering of single-molecule electronic devices,” added Liang Li, a PhD student in the lab, and a co-first author of the paper. “So creating these particular wires will lay the groundwork for major scientific advances in understanding transport through these novel systems. We’re very excited about our findings because they shed light not only on fundamental physics, but also on potential applications in the future.”

The group is currently developing new designs to build molecular wires that are even longer and still highly conductive.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Holly Evarts
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Office: 212-854-3206
Cell: 347-453-7408

Copyright © Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

About the Study

Related News Press

News and information

Virginia Tech physicists propose path to faster, more flexible robots: Virginia Tech physicists revealed a microscopic phenomenon that could greatly improve the performance of soft devices, such as agile flexible robots or microscopic capsules for drug delivery May 17th, 2024

Gene therapy relieves back pain, repairs damaged disc in mice: Study suggests nanocarriers loaded with DNA could replace opioids May 17th, 2024

Shedding light on perovskite hydrides using a new deposition technique: Researchers develop a methodology to grow single-crystal perovskite hydrides, enabling accurate hydride conductivity measurements May 17th, 2024

Physics

Finding quantum order in chaos May 17th, 2024

International research team uses wavefunction matching to solve quantum many-body problems: New approach makes calculations with realistic interactions possible May 17th, 2024

Chemistry

What heat can tell us about battery chemistry: using the Peltier effect to study lithium-ion cells March 8th, 2024

Two-dimensional bimetallic selenium-containing metal-organic frameworks and their calcinated derivatives as electrocatalysts for overall water splitting March 8th, 2024

Nanoscale CL thermometry with lanthanide-doped heavy-metal oxide in TEM March 8th, 2024

Discovery of new Li ion conductor unlocks new direction for sustainable batteries: University of Liverpool researchers have discovered a new solid material that rapidly conducts lithium ions February 16th, 2024

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

International research team uses wavefunction matching to solve quantum many-body problems: New approach makes calculations with realistic interactions possible May 17th, 2024

Aston University researcher receives £1 million grant to revolutionize miniature optical devices May 17th, 2024

NRL charters Navy’s quantum inertial navigation path to reduce drift April 5th, 2024

Discovery points path to flash-like memory for storing qubits: Rice find could hasten development of nonvolatile quantum memory April 5th, 2024

Possible Futures

Advances in priming B cell immunity against HIV pave the way to future HIV vaccines, shows quartet of new studies May 17th, 2024

International research team uses wavefunction matching to solve quantum many-body problems: New approach makes calculations with realistic interactions possible May 17th, 2024

Aston University researcher receives £1 million grant to revolutionize miniature optical devices May 17th, 2024

Gene therapy relieves back pain, repairs damaged disc in mice: Study suggests nanocarriers loaded with DNA could replace opioids May 17th, 2024

Chip Technology

Diamond glitter: A play of colors with artificial DNA crystals May 17th, 2024

Oscillating paramagnetic Meissner effect and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in cuprate superconductor May 17th, 2024

Discovery points path to flash-like memory for storing qubits: Rice find could hasten development of nonvolatile quantum memory April 5th, 2024

Utilizing palladium for addressing contact issues of buried oxide thin film transistors April 5th, 2024

Discoveries

Virginia Tech physicists propose path to faster, more flexible robots: Virginia Tech physicists revealed a microscopic phenomenon that could greatly improve the performance of soft devices, such as agile flexible robots or microscopic capsules for drug delivery May 17th, 2024

Diamond glitter: A play of colors with artificial DNA crystals May 17th, 2024

Finding quantum order in chaos May 17th, 2024

Advances in priming B cell immunity against HIV pave the way to future HIV vaccines, shows quartet of new studies May 17th, 2024

Announcements

Virginia Tech physicists propose path to faster, more flexible robots: Virginia Tech physicists revealed a microscopic phenomenon that could greatly improve the performance of soft devices, such as agile flexible robots or microscopic capsules for drug delivery May 17th, 2024

Diamond glitter: A play of colors with artificial DNA crystals May 17th, 2024

Finding quantum order in chaos May 17th, 2024

Oscillating paramagnetic Meissner effect and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in cuprate superconductor May 17th, 2024

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

International research team uses wavefunction matching to solve quantum many-body problems: New approach makes calculations with realistic interactions possible May 17th, 2024

Gene therapy relieves back pain, repairs damaged disc in mice: Study suggests nanocarriers loaded with DNA could replace opioids May 17th, 2024

Shedding light on perovskite hydrides using a new deposition technique: Researchers develop a methodology to grow single-crystal perovskite hydrides, enabling accurate hydride conductivity measurements May 17th, 2024

Oscillating paramagnetic Meissner effect and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in cuprate superconductor May 17th, 2024

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project