Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Shpyrko receives APS organization's Young Investigator Award

Oleg G. Shpyrko has received the 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award from the Advanced Photon Source Users Organization.
Oleg G. Shpyrko has received the 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award from the Advanced Photon Source Users Organization.

Abstract:
The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Users Organization has named Oleg G. Shpyrko as the recipient of the 2008 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award. The award recognizes an important technical or scientific accomplishment by a young investigator that depended on, or is beneficial to, the APS. Shpyrko received the award during 2008 Users Week at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, where he will also present his work.

Shpyrko receives APS organization's Young Investigator Award

ARGONNE, IL | Posted on May 10th, 2008

Shpyrko has been recognized for reaching a remarkably high level of achievement early in his career. He applied challenging surface and coherent X-ray scattering techniques to understanding the structure and dynamics of liquid metal surfaces and quantum states in condensed matter systems. He is also a dedicated and enthusiastic teacher.

He received his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University in 2004 under the direction of Peter Pershan; he then had postdoctoral fellowships at Harvard and the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory before joining the faculty of the University of California, San Diego, Physics Department in 2007.

As a postdoctoral fellow at Argonne, Shpyrko studied domain wall fluctuations in antiferromagnets, technologically important materials used to tailor the properties of magnetic sensors in hard drive read heads. In antiferromagnets, magnetic properties form distinct regions called domains. Fluctuations in the domain boundaries or walls were expected to cause magnetic noise that could affect the material's performance, but characteristics of the domains rendered them invisible to conventional techniques.

Shpyrko applied a newly developed technique called X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy to observe fluctuations of these domain walls for the first time. He found that the magnetic noise cannot be eliminated.

The ability to observe domain wall fluctuation is important both for engineering tailored materials and for fundamental studies in condensed matter physics.

For his thesis work, Shpyrko resolved a long-standing controversy on whether atomic layering is unique to liquid metals. He used X-ray surface scattering techniques to compare the surface structure in high-surface-tension liquid metals with the surface structure in low-surface-tension alkali metals and nonmetallic liquids. The results showed layering in alkali metals but no layering in water. The observation indicates that layering is unique to metallic liquids and it arises from electronic properties rather than high surface tension.

Shpyrko has continued to study the surface properties of liquid metals, working in particular with gold silicide (AuSi), a solder used in nanoscale circuitry. In contrast to the previously observed behavior of other liquid alloys and pure liquid metals, a nondilute liquid eutectic gold-silicon alloy (Au82Si18) developed both a crystallized alloy "skin" and an ordered structure extending several atomic layers into the bulk. The "skin" remained an alloy, rather than segregating to a pure metal as in other liquid alloys. The results are important because properties at the nanoscale, including the effectiveness of AuSi as a nanoscale solder, are expected to depend heavily on surface effects.

Located at Argonne, the APS is a national synchrotron X-ray research facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The APS provides the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere to more than 5,000 scientists worldwide.

####

About Argonne National Laboratory
Argonne National Laboratory brings the world's brightest scientists and engineers together to find exciting and creative new solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation's first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America's scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Brock Cooper
630/252-5565

Copyright © Argonne National Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Virginia Tech physicists propose path to faster, more flexible robots: Virginia Tech physicists revealed a microscopic phenomenon that could greatly improve the performance of soft devices, such as agile flexible robots or microscopic capsules for drug delivery May 17th, 2024

Gene therapy relieves back pain, repairs damaged disc in mice: Study suggests nanocarriers loaded with DNA could replace opioids May 17th, 2024

Shedding light on perovskite hydrides using a new deposition technique: Researchers develop a methodology to grow single-crystal perovskite hydrides, enabling accurate hydride conductivity measurements May 17th, 2024

Oscillating paramagnetic Meissner effect and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in cuprate superconductor May 17th, 2024

Laboratories

A battery’s hopping ions remember where they’ve been: Seen in atomic detail, the seemingly smooth flow of ions through a battery’s electrolyte is surprisingly complicated February 16th, 2024

NRL discovers two-dimensional waveguides February 16th, 2024

Catalytic combo converts CO2 to solid carbon nanofibers: Tandem electrocatalytic-thermocatalytic conversion could help offset emissions of potent greenhouse gas by locking carbon away in a useful material January 12th, 2024

Three-pronged approach discerns qualities of quantum spin liquids November 17th, 2023

Announcements

Virginia Tech physicists propose path to faster, more flexible robots: Virginia Tech physicists revealed a microscopic phenomenon that could greatly improve the performance of soft devices, such as agile flexible robots or microscopic capsules for drug delivery May 17th, 2024

Diamond glitter: A play of colors with artificial DNA crystals May 17th, 2024

Finding quantum order in chaos May 17th, 2024

Oscillating paramagnetic Meissner effect and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in cuprate superconductor May 17th, 2024

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Aston University researcher receives £1 million grant to revolutionize miniature optical devices May 17th, 2024

Discovery points path to flash-like memory for storing qubits: Rice find could hasten development of nonvolatile quantum memory April 5th, 2024

Chemical reactions can scramble quantum information as well as black holes April 5th, 2024

Discovery of new Li ion conductor unlocks new direction for sustainable batteries: University of Liverpool researchers have discovered a new solid material that rapidly conducts lithium ions February 16th, 2024

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project