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Home > News > Researchers set to do teraflops over UT's most powerful supercomputer yet

December 27th, 2007

Researchers set to do teraflops over UT's most powerful supercomputer yet

Abstract:
Ranger will be quick on the draw. The $59 million supercomputer is expected to run at up to 504 trillion operations per second, making it one of the most powerful in the world.

The machine, based on hardware from Sun Microsystems Inc. and 15,000 processor chips from Advanced Micro Devices Inc., is expected to be put to work on such complex computing problems as earthquake prediction and simulation, climate modeling, advanced weather forecasting, molecular science simulations, nanotechnology and astrophysics.

"Ranger will enable computations science research that has been heretofore impossible, and it will provide opportunities in computer science and technology that are groundbreaking," said Juan Sanchez, vice president for research at UT.

Source:
statesman.com

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