Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Integration of novel materials with silicon chips makes new 'smart' devices possible

Abstract:
“Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates”

Authors: Srinivasa Rao Singamaneni and J. T. Prater, North Carolina State University and the Army Research Office; J. Narayan, North Carolina State University

Published: July 18, Applied Physics Reviews

DOI: 10.1063/1.4955413

Abstract: Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO3, SrTiO3 (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such as threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called “domain matching epitaxy,” is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%–25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation “smart” devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin-film heterostructure systems that span a variety of ferroelectric, multiferroic, magnetic, photocatalytic, and smart materials. Their properties have been extensively investigated and their functionality found to be comparable to films grown on single-crystal oxide substrates previously reported by researchers in this field. In addition, this review explores the utility of using laser processing to introduce stable defects in a controlled way and induce magnetism and engineer the optical and electrical properties of nonmagnetic oxides such as BaTiO3, VO2, NiO, and TiO2 as an alternative for incorporating additional magnetic and conducting layers into the structure. These significant materials advancements herald a flurry of exciting new advances in CMOS-compatible multifunctional devices.

Integration of novel materials with silicon chips makes new 'smart' devices possible

Raleigh, NC | Posted on July 25th, 2016

The novel functional materials are oxides, including several types of materials that, until now, could not be integrated onto silicon chips: multiferroic materials, which have both ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties; topological insulators, which act as insulators in bulk but have conductive properties on their surface; and novel ferroelectric materials. These materials are thought to hold promise for applications including sensors, non-volatile computer memory and microelectromechanical systems, which are better known as MEMS.

"These novel oxides are normally grown on materials that are not compatible with computing devices," says Jay Narayan, the John C. Fan Distinguished Chair Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at NC State and co-author of a paper describing the work. "We are now able to integrate these materials onto a silicon chip, allowing us to incorporate their functions into electronic devices."

The approach developed by the researchers allows them to integrate the materials onto two platforms, both of which are compatible with silicon: a titanium nitride platform, for use with nitride-based electronics; and yttria-stabilized zirconia, for use with oxide-based electronics.

Specifically, the researchers developed a suite of thin films that serve as a buffer, connecting the silicon chip to the relevant novel materials. The exact combination of thin films varies, depending on which novel materials are being used.

For example, if using multiferroic materials, researchers use a combination of four different thin films: titanium nitride, magnesium oxide, strontium oxide and lanthanum strontium manganese oxide. But for topological insulators, they would use a combination of only two thin films: magnesium oxide and titanium nitride.

These thin film buffers align with the planes of the crystalline structure in the novel oxide materials, as well as with the planes of the underlying substrate - effectively serving as a communicating layer between the materials.

This approach, called thin film epitaxy, is based on the concept of domain-matching epitaxy, and was first proposed by Narayan in a 2003 paper.

"Integrating these novel materials onto silicon chips makes many things possible," Narayan says. "For example, this allows us to sense or collect data; to manipulate that data; and to calculate a response - all on one compact chip. This makes for faster, more efficient, lighter devices."

Another possible application, Narayan says, is the creation of LEDs on silicon chips, to make "smart lights." Currently, LEDs are made using sapphire substrates, which aren't directly compatible with computing devices.

"We've already patented this integration technology, and are currently looking for industry partners to license it," Narayan says.

###

The paper, "Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates," is published online in the journal Applied Physics Reviews. Lead author of the paper is Srinivasa Singamaneni, a postdoctoral researcher at NC State who is also affiliated with the Army Research Office. The paper was co-authored by John Prater of the Army Research Office, who is also an adjunct professor of materials science and engineering at NC State. The work was supported by the Army Research Office under grant number W911NF-04-D-0003, and was done with technical support from NC State's Analytical Instrumentation Facility.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Matt Shipman

919-515-6386

Copyright © North Carolina State University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

Shape-shifting sensors could catch early signs of cancer October 19th, 2018

Study provides insight into how nanoparticles interact with biological systems: Findings can help scientists engineer nanoparticles that are ‘benign by design’ October 18th, 2018

Iran Produces Cooling Fabrics Using Nanotechnology October 17th, 2018

Iran World’s Second Largest Producer of Nano-Catalysts October 17th, 2018

Hardware

All wired up: New molecular wires for single-molecule electronic devices August 31st, 2018

Quantum Interference May Be Key to Smaller Insulators: Breakthrough could jumpstart further miniaturization of transistors June 6th, 2018

Building nanomaterials for next-generation computing: Scientists recently developed a blueprint to fabricate new nanoheterostructures using 2D materials June 1st, 2018

Novel method to fabricate nanoribbons from speeding nano droplets May 29th, 2018

NEMS

UT engineers develop first method for controlling nanomotors: Breakthrough for nanotechnology as UT engineers develop first method for switching the mechanical motion of nanomotors September 21st, 2018

Nano-kirigami: 'Paper-cut' provides model for 3D intelligent nanofabrication July 13th, 2018

One string to rule them all April 17th, 2018

Leti Scientists Participating in Sessions on Med Tech, Automotive Technologies, MEMS, Si-photonics and Lithography at SEMICON Europa: Teams also Will Demonstrate Technology Advances in Telecom, Data Fusion, Energy, Silicon Photonics and 3D Integration October 18th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Shape-shifting sensors could catch early signs of cancer October 19th, 2018

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Files for Regulatory Clearance to Begin Phase 1 Study of ARO-ANG3 October 15th, 2018

Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications October 12th, 2018

High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC October 12th, 2018

Possible Futures

Shape-shifting sensors could catch early signs of cancer October 19th, 2018

Study provides insight into how nanoparticles interact with biological systems: Findings can help scientists engineer nanoparticles that are ‘benign by design’ October 18th, 2018

Iran Unveils Its First Homegrown 3D Nano Printer October 17th, 2018

Rice U. announces $82 million in strategic research initiatives: Faculty, programs will expand in neuroengineering, synthetic biology, physical biology October 16th, 2018

MEMS

UCI scientists push microscopy to sub-molecular resolution: Carbon monoxide used to measure electric forces in single chemical compound October 2nd, 2018

Mirrorcle Demonstrates MEMS-based Programmable Light Source at CES and PW18 August 30th, 2018

Stress-free ALD from Picosun August 28th, 2018

Nano-kirigami: 'Paper-cut' provides model for 3D intelligent nanofabrication July 13th, 2018

Chip Technology

Nanometrics to Announce Third Quarter Financial Results on October 30, 2018 October 10th, 2018

Graphene controls surface magnetism at room temperature October 8th, 2018

UCI scientists push microscopy to sub-molecular resolution: Carbon monoxide used to measure electric forces in single chemical compound October 2nd, 2018

Machine learning helps improving photonic applications September 28th, 2018

Sensors

Shape-shifting sensors could catch early signs of cancer October 19th, 2018

Researchers quickly harvest 2-D materials, bringing them closer to commercialization: Efficient method for making single-atom-thick, wafer-scale materials opens up opportunities in flexible electronics October 12th, 2018

Columbia Engineers Build Smallest Integrated Kerr Frequency Comb Generator October 9th, 2018

New bio-inspired dynamic materials transform themselves: Highly dynamic synthetic superstructure provides new clues on brain, spinal cord injuries and neurological disease October 5th, 2018

Discoveries

Shape-shifting sensors could catch early signs of cancer October 19th, 2018

Study provides insight into how nanoparticles interact with biological systems: Findings can help scientists engineer nanoparticles that are ‘benign by design’ October 18th, 2018

Researchers quickly harvest 2-D materials, bringing them closer to commercialization: Efficient method for making single-atom-thick, wafer-scale materials opens up opportunities in flexible electronics October 12th, 2018

Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications October 12th, 2018

Announcements

Shape-shifting sensors could catch early signs of cancer October 19th, 2018

Study provides insight into how nanoparticles interact with biological systems: Findings can help scientists engineer nanoparticles that are ‘benign by design’ October 18th, 2018

Iran Unveils Its First Homegrown 3D Nano Printer October 17th, 2018

Fat-Repellent Nanolayers Can Make Oven Cleaning Easier October 17th, 2018

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Study provides insight into how nanoparticles interact with biological systems: Findings can help scientists engineer nanoparticles that are ‘benign by design’ October 18th, 2018

Big award enables study of small surfaces: Rice U.'s Matt Jones wins Packard Fellowship to view nanoscale chemical reactions October 15th, 2018

Graphene shows unique potential to exceed bandwidth demands of future telecommunications October 12th, 2018

High-performance self-assembled catalyst for SOFC October 12th, 2018

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

180 Degree Capital Corp. Announces New Portfolio Holdings – Airgain, Inc., EMCORE Corporation, Lantronix, Inc. and PDL BioPharma, Inc. October 12th, 2018

Arrowhead Enters $3.7 Billion License and Collaboration Agreements with Janssen October 4th, 2018

Silvaco, Purdue team up to bring scalable atomistic TCAD solutions for next generation semiconductor devices and materials August 24th, 2018

CTI Materials drives nano commercialization with it's patented surfactant free nanoparticle dispersions August 15th, 2018

Military

Columbia Engineers Build Smallest Integrated Kerr Frequency Comb Generator October 9th, 2018

Light makes Rice U. catalyst more effective: Halas lab details plasmonic effect that allows catalyst to work at lower energy October 5th, 2018

Unmasking corrosion to design better protective thin films for metals: Researchers from three universities team up to analyze oxide films at atomic level October 3rd, 2018

Ultracold atoms used to verify 1963 prediction about 1D electrons: Rice University, University of Geneva study focuses on theory that's increasingly relevant to chipmakers September 5th, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project