Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Hopes of improved brain implants

Abstract:
Neurons thrive and grow in a new type of nanowire material developed by researchers in Nanophysics and Ophthalmology at Lund University in Sweden. In time, the results might improve both neural and retinal implants, and reduce the risk of them losing their effectiveness over time, which is currently a problem.

Hopes of improved brain implants

Lund, Sweden | Posted on October 1st, 2015

By implanting electrodes in the brain tissue one can stimulate or capture signals from different areas of the brain. These types of brain implants, or neuro-prostheses as they are sometimes called, are used to treat Parkinson’s disease and other neurological diseases.

They are currently being tested in other areas, such as depression, severe cases of autism, obsessive-compulsive disorders and paralysis. Another research track is to determine whether retinal implants are able to replace light-sensitive cells that die in cases of Retinitis Pigmentosa and other eye diseases.

However, there are severe drawbacks associated with today’s implants. One problem is that the body interprets the implants as foreign objects, resulting in an encapsulation of the electrode, which in turn leads to loss of signal.

“Our nanowire structure prevents the cells that usually encapsulate the electrodes – glial cells – from doing so”, says Christelle Prinz, researcher in Nanophysics at Lund University in Sweden, who developed this technique together with Maria Thereza Perez, a researcher in Ophthalmology.

“I was very pleasantly surprised by these results. In previous in-vitro experiments, the glial cells usually attach strongly to the electrodes”, she says.

To avoid this, the researchers have developed a small substrate where regions of super thin nanowires are combined with flat regions. While neurons grow and extend processes on the nanowires, the glial cells primarily occupy the flat regions in between.

“The different types of cells continue to interact. This is necessary for the neurons to survive because the glial cells provide them with important molecules.”

So far, tests have only been done with cultured cells (in vitro) but hopefully they will soon be able to continue with experiments in vivo.

The substrate is made from the semiconductor material gallium phosphide where each outgrowing nanowire has a diameter of only 80 nanometres (billionths of a metre).

####

About Lund University
Our university has all the advantages of a wide academic range and highly-qualified staff. We offer a rich and diverse academic environment with creative links between students and teachers, international cutting-edge researchers and between university and community.

Lund University is Scandinavia's largest institution for education and research. We are active in Lund, Malmoe and Helsingborg, and have a comprehensive global network of contacts and growing co-operation within the oeresund University.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Lotte Billing


Christelle Prinz
+46 46 222 47 96

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Full bibliographic information

Related News Press

News and information

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

UCF researcher receives Samsung International Global Research Outreach Award: The award from the multinational electronics corporation will fund the development of infrared night vision and thermal sensing camera technology for cell phones and consumer electronics January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Brain-Computer Interfaces

Taking salt out of the water equation October 7th, 2022

Development of dendritic-network-implementable artificial neurofiber transistors: Transistors with a fibrous architecture similar to those of neurons are capable of forming artificial neural networks. Fibrous networks can be used in smart wearable devices and robots September 24th, 2021

New brain-like computing device simulates human learning: Researchers conditioned device to learn by association, like Pavlov's dog April 30th, 2021

CEA-Leti Announces EU Project to Mimic Multi-Timescale Processing of Biological Neural Systems: Targeted Applications Include High-Dimensional Distributed Environmental Monitoring, Implantable Medical-Diagnostic Microchips, Wearable Electronics & Human/Computer Interfaces April 23rd, 2021

Possible Futures

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Danish quantum physicists make nanoscopic advance of colossal significance January 27th, 2023

UC Irvine researchers decipher atomic-scale imperfections in lithium-ion batteries: Team used super high-resolution microscopy enhanced by deep machine learning January 27th, 2023

Nanomedicine

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

New nanoparticles deliver therapy brain-wide, edit Alzheimer’s gene in mice: UW researchers have found a way to move gene therapies through the blood-brain barrier, a crucial step for brain-wide CRISPR treatments of disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease January 20th, 2023

Team undertakes study of two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenides Important biomedical application, including biosensing December 9th, 2022

SLAC/Stanford researchers discover how a nano-chamber in the cell directs protein folding: The results challenge a 70-year-old theory of how proteins fold in our cells and have profound implications for treating diseases linked to protein misfolding December 9th, 2022

Discoveries

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

Stability of perovskite solar cells reaches next milestone January 27th, 2023

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Announcements

UCF researcher receives Samsung International Global Research Outreach Award: The award from the multinational electronics corporation will fund the development of infrared night vision and thermal sensing camera technology for cell phones and consumer electronics January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Quantum sensors see Weyl photocurrents flow: Boston College-led team develops new quantum sensor technique to image and understand the origin of photocurrent flow in Weyl semimetals January 27th, 2023

Department of Energy announces $9.1 million for research on quantum information science and nuclear physics: Projects span the development of quantum computing, algorithms, simulators, superconducting qubits, and quantum sensors for advancing nuclear physics January 27th, 2023

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Qubits on strong stimulants: Researchers find ways to improve the storage time of quantum information in a spin rich material January 27th, 2023

Temperature-sensing building material changes color to save energy January 27th, 2023

Quantum sensors see Weyl photocurrents flow: Boston College-led team develops new quantum sensor technique to image and understand the origin of photocurrent flow in Weyl semimetals January 27th, 2023

Danish quantum physicists make nanoscopic advance of colossal significance January 27th, 2023

Nanobiotechnology

One of the causes of aggressive liver cancer discovered: a 'molecular staple' that helps repair broken: DNA Researchers describe a new DNA repair mechanism that hinders cancer treatment January 27th, 2023

New nanoparticles deliver therapy brain-wide, edit Alzheimer’s gene in mice: UW researchers have found a way to move gene therapies through the blood-brain barrier, a crucial step for brain-wide CRISPR treatments of disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease January 20th, 2023

Team undertakes study of two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenides Important biomedical application, including biosensing December 9th, 2022

SLAC/Stanford researchers discover how a nano-chamber in the cell directs protein folding: The results challenge a 70-year-old theory of how proteins fold in our cells and have profound implications for treating diseases linked to protein misfolding December 9th, 2022

Life Extension/Cryonics

Ageing can drive progress: Population ageing is likely to boost medicine, nanotechnology and robotics, but increase political risks July 27th, 2016

Multicolor super resolution imaging: A method to monitor dynamic protein binding at subsecond timescales June 19th, 2016

Preventing protein unfolding: Polymers can reinforce proteins under mechanical forces February 27th, 2016

Lifeboat Foundation launches 3 books December 16th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project