Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Self-Folding Polymers: Nature-Inspired Microengineering of Complex 3D Structures

Abstract:
Self-organisation and assembly at the sub-millimeter-scale are fundamental for structure formation in nature, and, not surprisingly, are inspiring the design of new, intelligent materials with fascinating properties. A new platform has been developed by researchers in Germany allowing the strategic design and fabrication of 3D polymeric materials with complexity surpassing that found in nature. The new materials yielded could lead to significant, foreseeable advances in technologies such as microfluidics, biomaterials, and soft electronics.

Self-Folding Polymers: Nature-Inspired Microengineering of Complex 3D Structures

Germany | Posted on November 29th, 2012

Dr. Leonid Ionov and co-workers employed a thin self-folding polymer film as the biomimetic material. In general, self-folding polymer films consist of two different polymers, one of which is stimuli responsive. This results in non-equal expansion upon exposure to an external stimulus (e.g., temperature, pH, light), and hence folding of the film. Until now, however, a facile approach to control this process and attain specific geometries has been lacking. The two general approaches previously used either involve homogeneous bilayers from which only simple, round structures are attained or rely on complex, local patterning of active materials on the film which act as hinges, permitting more sophisticated geometries to be realised. Significantly, both approaches only permit folding to occur in a single step. In contrast, the new approach developed is not only multistep, but affords sharply hinged structures without the tedious need for pattering of active polymers.

At the crux of this technique is the fact that the thermally-induced swelling of the polymer bilayer film used is not homogeneous; rather it occurs progressively with a path dependence that is determined by the local film geometry. This is a consequence of water only being able to penetrate the bilayer from its periphery. The swelling and subsequent folding of the film occur as the water diffusion front progresses inwards.

By analysing the folding patterns, the researchers identified, supported by numerical simulations, an underlying set of folding rules, demonstrating that the isotropic films bend in a predictable manner. Applying these rules, they were able to tailor the initial film, such that hinges formed at desired locations upon thermal activation. The folding process could thereby be directed in multiple, discrete steps, forming complex 3D structures. An elegant example of this is the pyramids shown in the figure and movie above.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Wiley-VCH Materials Science Journals

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Materials for the next generation of electronics and photovoltaics: MacArthur Fellow develops new uses for carbon nanotubes October 21st, 2014

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes: University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices October 21st, 2014

Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries October 21st, 2014

Could I squeeze by you? Ames Laboratory scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles October 21st, 2014

Videos/Movies

Ucore's McKenzie to Deliver Presentation to Rare Earths Conference in Singapore as Highlight of Fall 2014 Marketplace Schedule October 19th, 2014

Australian teams set new records for silicon quantum computing October 12th, 2014

Nano-bearings on the test bench: Fullerene spheres can be used to slide in the nanoworld October 3rd, 2014

Thin films

Nanocoatings Market By Product Is Expected To Reach USD 8.17 Billion By 2020: Grand View Research, Inc. October 15th, 2014

3x improvement in wear resistance from Carbodeon nanodiamond-enhanced electroless nickel plating October 14th, 2014

Tailored flexible illusion coatings hide objects from detection October 13th, 2014

Microfluidics/Nanofluidics

Dolomite and Lab on a Chip launch Productizing Science® Competition 2015 October 7th, 2014

Flexible Electronics

Crumpled graphene could provide an unconventional energy storage: Two-dimensional carbon “paper” can form stretchable supercapacitors to power flexible electronic devices October 4th, 2014

'Pixel' engineered electronics have growth potential: Rice, Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt, Penn scientists lead creation of atom-scale semiconducting composites September 29th, 2014

'Greener,' low-cost transistor heralds advance in flexible electronics September 24th, 2014

Chip Technology

Materials for the next generation of electronics and photovoltaics: MacArthur Fellow develops new uses for carbon nanotubes October 21st, 2014

Nitrogen Doped Graphene Characterized by Iranian, Russian, German Scientists October 21st, 2014

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream: Scientists have designed the first large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features, which could create revolutionary nanodevices October 20th, 2014

Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires October 20th, 2014

Self Assembly

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream: Scientists have designed the first large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features, which could create revolutionary nanodevices October 20th, 2014

New Topical Hemostatic Agent: Neutral Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel September 30th, 2014

Big Results Require Big Ambitions: Three young UCSB faculty receive CAREER awards from the National Science Foundation September 18th, 2014

Rice rolls 'neat' nanotube fibers: Rice University researchers' acid-free approach leads to strong conductive carbon threads September 15th, 2014

Discoveries

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes: University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices October 21st, 2014

Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries October 21st, 2014

Could I squeeze by you? Ames Laboratory scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles October 21st, 2014

Detecting Cancer Earlier is Goal of Rutgers-Developed Medical Imaging Technology: Rare earth nanocrystals and infrared light can reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions October 21st, 2014

Materials/Metamaterials

Materials for the next generation of electronics and photovoltaics: MacArthur Fellow develops new uses for carbon nanotubes October 21st, 2014

Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries October 21st, 2014

Could I squeeze by you? Ames Laboratory scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles October 21st, 2014

Removal of Limitations of Composites at Superheat Temperatures October 20th, 2014

Announcements

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes: University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices October 21st, 2014

Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries October 21st, 2014

Could I squeeze by you? Ames Laboratory scientists model molecular movement within narrow channels of mesoporous nanoparticles October 21st, 2014

Detecting Cancer Earlier is Goal of Rutgers-Developed Medical Imaging Technology: Rare earth nanocrystals and infrared light can reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions October 21st, 2014

Nanobiotechnology

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream: Scientists have designed the first large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features, which could create revolutionary nanodevices October 20th, 2014

Scientists Map Key Moment in Assembly of DNA-Splitting Molecular Machine: Crucial steps and surprising structures revealed in the genesis of the enzyme that divides the DNA double helix during cell replication October 15th, 2014

DNA nano-foundries cast custom-shaped metal nanoparticles: DNA's programmable assembly is leveraged to form precise 3D nanomaterials for disease detection, environmental testing, electronics and beyond October 10th, 2014

Charged graphene gives DNA a stage to perform molecular gymnastics October 9th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE