Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Illinois professor named Packard Fellow

Photo courtesy of department of chemical and biomolecular engineering

Charles Schroeder, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, has been named one of 16 Packard Fellows in science and engineering.
Photo courtesy of department of chemical and biomolecular engineering

Charles Schroeder, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, has been named one of 16 Packard Fellows in science and engineering.

Abstract:
University of Illinois chemical and biomolecular engineering professor Charles Schroeder has been named a Packard Fellow in science and engineering. He is among 16 early career researchers honored by the David and Lucille Packard Foundation in 2011 for outstanding creative research.

Illinois professor named Packard Fellow

Champaign, IL | Posted on October 24th, 2011

Pushing the bounds of optical microscopy, Schroeder works to develop techniques and tools to study chemical and biological processes on a molecular scale. His group uses super-resolution imaging and tailored probe molecules to explore the dynamic behavior of cellular and nanoscale systems for applications in materials, biology, energy and optical imaging.

"The Packard award will enable his research group to do high-risk, high-return research that will advance the field of optical microscopy to reach the level of molecular-scale resolution, thereby enabling unprecedented studies of processes of living and non-living systems," said Paul Kenis, professor and head of the department of chemical and biomolecular engineering.

Schroeder is pursuing several areas of research with the goal of improving optical imaging at very small scales. Current high-resolution techniques can image at 20 to 25 nanometers, but Schroeder hopes that his work with probes, traps and hybrid materials will allow researchers to "zoom in" to the molecular scale - a mere 1 to 5 nanometers.

The Packard Foundation recognized Schroeder for his work with fluorescent probes for ultra-high-resolution imaging. Probe molecules are like small tags that attach to a larger molecule that researchers are studying, allowing them to "see" the molecule and study its function. The latest fluorescent probes from Schroeder's group are brighter and more stable than other available probes, and can be turned off and on with a laser.

The fellowship includes an unrestricted five-year, $875,000 award to support research of the recipient's choosing. Schroeder's award will fund the use of the new probes to study retroviruses and bacterial gene expression.

"We plan to apply these tools to study regulation of anaerobic metabolism with exquisite resolution in single bacterial cells," Schroeder said. "If we stumble onto something that is exciting and promising, then this award gives us the freedom to explore new directions in research."

Schroeder earned his doctorate from Stanford University in 2004, then completed postdoctorate fellowships at Harvard University and the University of California at Berkeley before joining the Illinois faculty in 2008. He also is affiliated with the department of materials sciences and engineering and the Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology at the U. of I.

Since its inception in 1988, the Packard Fellowship Program has named 473 fellows, including 12 U. of I. faculty members. Each year, new fellows are chosen from nominations submitted by the presidents of 50 top universities. The Packard Foundation is not the first to recognize Schroeder as one of the most promising young researchers in the U.S., as Genome Technology magazine named him "Tomorrow's PI" in 2008.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Liz Ahlberg
Physical Sciences Editor
217-244-1073


Charles Schroeder
217-333-3906

Copyright © University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Little ANTs: Researchers build the world's tiniest engine May 3rd, 2016

An Experiment Seeks to Make Quantum Physics Visible to the Naked Eye May 3rd, 2016

Quantum sensors for high-precision magnetometry of superconductors May 3rd, 2016

New drug-delivery approach holds potential for treating obesity May 2nd, 2016

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

Imaging

Making invisible physics visible: The Jayich Lab has created a new sensor technology that captures nanoscale images with high spatial resolution and sensitivity May 2nd, 2016

The Translational Research Center at the University Hospital of Erlangen in Germany uses the ZetaView from Particle Metrix to quantify extracellular vesicles such as exosomes April 28th, 2016

Academic/Education

JPK reports on the use of a NanoWizard AFM system at the University of Kaiserslautern to study the interaction of bacteria with microstructured surfaces April 28th, 2016

The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute uses the ZetaView from Particle Metrix to study membrane microparticles as potential biomarkers for underlying diseases April 12th, 2016

FEI Partners with Five Pharmaceutical Companies, the Medical Research Council and the University of Cambridge to form Cryo-EM Research Consortium April 5th, 2016

SUNY Poly, in Collaboration with the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Stony Brook University, Demonstrates Pioneering Method to Visualize and Identify Engineered Nanoparticles in Tissue March 25th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Little ANTs: Researchers build the world's tiniest engine May 3rd, 2016

Non-animal approach to predict impact of nanomaterials on human lung published Archives of Toxicology publishes workshop recommendations May 2nd, 2016

New drug-delivery approach holds potential for treating obesity May 2nd, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Materials/Metamaterials

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material April 29th, 2016

Hybrid nanoantennas -- next-generation platform for ultradense data recording April 28th, 2016

Atomic magnets using hydrogen and graphene April 27th, 2016

Announcements

Little ANTs: Researchers build the world's tiniest engine May 3rd, 2016

An Experiment Seeks to Make Quantum Physics Visible to the Naked Eye May 3rd, 2016

Quantum sensors for high-precision magnetometry of superconductors May 3rd, 2016

New drug-delivery approach holds potential for treating obesity May 2nd, 2016

Tools

Making invisible physics visible: The Jayich Lab has created a new sensor technology that captures nanoscale images with high spatial resolution and sensitivity May 2nd, 2016

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material April 29th, 2016

JPK reports on the use of a NanoWizard AFM system at the University of Kaiserslautern to study the interaction of bacteria with microstructured surfaces April 28th, 2016

Chemists use DNA to build the world's tiniest thermometer April 27th, 2016

Energy

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops May 1st, 2016

NREL finds nanotube semiconductors well-suited for PV systems April 27th, 2016

Researchers create artificial protein to control assembly of buckyballs April 27th, 2016

Flipping a chemical switch helps perovskite solar cells beat the heat April 26th, 2016

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

An Experiment Seeks to Make Quantum Physics Visible to the Naked Eye May 3rd, 2016

Brookhaven's Oleg Gang Named a Battelle 'Inventor of the Year': Recognized for work using DNA to guide and regulate the self-assembly of nanoparticles into clusters and arrays with controllable properties April 25th, 2016

Zip software can detect the quantum-classical boundary: Compression of experimental data reveals the presence of quantum correlations April 21st, 2016

Making electronics out of coal: Instead of burning up this complex hydrocarbon, let's make devices from it April 20th, 2016

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material April 29th, 2016

Researchers create a first frequency comb of time-bin entangled qubits: Discovery is a significant step toward multi-channel quantum communication and higher capacity quantum computers April 28th, 2016

Hybrid nanoantennas -- next-generation platform for ultradense data recording April 28th, 2016

NREL theory establishes a path to high-performance 2-D semiconductor devices April 27th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic