Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Glidewell Laboratories Announces Nanozirconia Technology Breakthrough

High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image of Glidewell Laboratories' 3 nm nanocrystalline zirconia material produced by gas-phase condensation "bottom-up" nanotechnology.
High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image of Glidewell Laboratories' 3 nm nanocrystalline zirconia material produced by gas-phase condensation "bottom-up" nanotechnology.

Abstract:
Glidewell Dental Lab's Continued Research and Development Efforts Lead to New Ceramic Nanotechnology

Glidewell Laboratories Announces Nanozirconia Technology Breakthrough

Newport Beach, CA | Posted on February 15th, 2011

Glidewell Laboratories, industry-leading provider of dental lab products and services and manufacturer of BruxZir Solid Zirconia dental material, Research & Development team has moved closer to producing transparent nanozirconia by successfully synthesizing 3 nm zirconia nanocrystals produced by "bottom-up" nanotechnology.

The research team, led by Ken Knapp, Glidewell Laboratories' program manager and lead researcher, developed a method for producing non-agglomerated 3 nm nanocrystalline zirconia powder using a revolutionary bottom-up nanotechnology technique known as "gas-phase condensation." The focused effort of the nanozirconia research team over the last year has resulted in new discoveries about the nature of sub-5 nm nanozirconia crystals. Glidewell Laboratories has filed a U.S. patent application on the new ceramic nanotechnology (patent pending). This method consists of colliding high-energy yttrium, zirconium and oxygen ions together in an energetic gaseous phase and condensing yttria zirconia nanocrystal particles resulting from atomic collisions during flight in the gas phase. The condensed yttria zirconia nanocrystal particles are separated from the gas phase and collected in the form of nanocrystalline powder. According to Knapp, "The key to making transparent polycrystalline zirconia material is starting with a non-agglomerated yttria zirconia primary crystal size less than 5 nm. Glidewell's new gas-phase condensation nanotechnology for producing nanozirconia will allow us to overcome the fundamental polycrystalline birefringence barrier to manufacturing a transparent, high-strength monolithic dental ceramic product."

Conventional nanozirconia powder is typically produced by "top-down" nanotechnology methods such as hydrothermal synthesis (calcining followed by ball-milling). Many of the nanozirconia powders available on the market today are comprised of hard-agglomerated nanocrystals with a primary crystal size of approximately 30 nm. After sintering, typical nanozirconia grain size is between 500-1000 nm. The top-down method is widely used to produce nanocrystalline materials by breaking down larger particles and agglomerates into smaller ones, typically by ball-milling. The bottom-up nanotechnology method builds up nanoscale materials atom by atom or molecule by molecule. Bottom-up nanoscale science and technology is the state of the art for producing the next generation nanoscale materials and devices. The bottom-up method has a lower scale limit on the atomic or molecular level. Additionally, the bottom-up-produced nanocrystalline structures are not altered during the process of forming the nanoscale crystals, whereas top-down methods alter the crystal structure and surface chemistry.

Robin Carden, senior director of Glidewell Laboratories materials research and development said, "Glidewell's nanozirconia material produced by the gas-phase condensation method overcomes the inherent sub-5 nm crystal size production barrier and hard-agglomeration formations found in conventional nanocrystalline ceramic processing."

Common zirconia dental ceramics are translucent and not transparent as a result of light-scattering during transmission by birefringence and porosity. Light-scattering by birefringence is an intrinsic property of polycrystalline optical materials with an anisotropic crystalline index of refraction. Birefringence is reduced dramatically when the sintered grain size is reduced below 100 nm. Porosity causes light-scattering in the visible spectrum between 400-700 nm, which reduces the zirconia optical transparency.

The future for high-strength esthetic nanozirconia is agglomerate-free sub-5 nm powder. James Glidewell, CDT, CEO and president of Glidewell Laboratories said, "Our continued nanozirconia research efforts, from the fundamental way that zirconia nanocrystals are formed to new sintering methods, will allow us to extend our BruxZir® product life into the next generation of nanocrystalline dental ceramics."

For a closer look at BruxZir Solid Zircoinia, visit www.bruxzir.com

####

About Glidewell Laboratories
Glidewell Laboratories is a privately owned corporation that has more than 40 years of history as a provider of high-quality services and products to dental laboratories nationwide. It has its own 73-person Research and Development team and is the most resourceful dental laboratory in the world. Its newly developed CAD/CAM processing capabilities are recognized as among the most advanced in the industry. To view our large selection of products and services, visit www.glidewelldental.com

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Glidewell Laboratories

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

World's fastest man-made spinning object could help study quantum mechanics July 20th, 2018

Relax, just break it July 20th, 2018

Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers July 20th, 2018

The relationship between charge density waves and superconductivity? It's complicated July 19th, 2018

Products

NEI Corporation introduces UV-Protect Technology to NANOMYTE® Coating Line April 9th, 2018

STMicroelectronics Peps Up Booming Social-Fitness Scene with Smart Motion Sensors for Better Accuracy, Longer Battery Life, and Faster Time to Market January 2nd, 2017

Cutting-edge nanotechnologies are breaking into industries November 18th, 2016

STMicroelectronics’ Semiconductor Chips Contribute to Connected Toothbrush from Oral-B That Sees What You Don’t: Microcontroller and Accelerometer help brushers clean their teeth more effectively October 4th, 2016

Materials/Metamaterials

Relax, just break it July 20th, 2018

In borophene, boundaries are no barrier: Rice U., Northwestern researchers make and test atom-thick boron's unique domains July 17th, 2018

Barium ruthenate: A high-yield, easy-to-handle perovskite catalyst for the oxidation of sulfides July 13th, 2018

Carbon is the new black: Researchers use carbon nanotubes to develop clothing that can double as batteries July 10th, 2018

Announcements

World's fastest man-made spinning object could help study quantum mechanics July 20th, 2018

Relax, just break it July 20th, 2018

Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers July 20th, 2018

The relationship between charge density waves and superconductivity? It's complicated July 19th, 2018

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Sirrus's Issued Patent Portfolio Continues To Accelerate July 18th, 2018

Changing the grocery game: Manufacturing process provides low-cost, sustainable option for food packaging June 26th, 2018

Tunable diamond string may hold key to quantum memory: A process similar to guitar tuning improves storage time of quantum memory May 24th, 2018

Self-assembling 3D battery would charge in seconds May 22nd, 2018

Dental

Detecting the birth and death of a phonon June 7th, 2018

MEET THE WOMAN BEHIND THE NANOTECHNOLOGY THAT REVOLUTIONIZED DENTAL CARE May 1st, 2018

A Tougher Tooth: A new dental restoration composite developed by UCSB scientists proves more durable than the conventional material August 22nd, 2017

New technology can detect tiny ovarian tumors: 'Synthetic biomarkers' could be used to diagnose ovarian cancer months earlier than now possible April 10th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project