Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Metal oxide ‘can transform’

An atomic model of the surface of strontium titanate
An atomic model of the surface of strontium titanate

Abstract:
An international team, including Oxford University scientists, has been investigating what happens to the top layer of atoms on the surface of a material.

Metal oxide ‘can transform’

UK | Posted on February 15th, 2010

The material is strontium titanate: a complex metal oxide that many researchers are interested in because of its ability to split water into hydrogen and oxygen with sunlight and its potential for use in electronic devices.

The team used a variety of techniques including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to directly ‘see' the arrangement of surface atoms. Their observations, reported in this week's Nature Materials, reveal a series of structures with a surprisingly close and orderly arrangement.

‘In most materials, when you create a surface, the top layer of atoms rearrange to different positions from those in the rest of the material. This rearrangement of atoms is usually locked into a particular configuration that will minimise the surface energy.' said Dr Martin Castell of Oxford University's Department of Materials, an author of the paper. ‘However, this is not the case for the surface of strontium titanate that we have been studying. This surface forms a whole family of different structures. Chemists would call these structures a homologous series - something that is routinely observed in the bulk of crystals, but not until now on the surface.'

These ‘transformations' could prove very important to researchers hoping to use strontium titanate in order to build new kinds of nanoelectronic devices or to grow thin films.

The report also suggests that the techniques developed by the researchers could make it possible to predict the surface structures of other oxides.

'We have needed to use many different sophisticated experimental and theoretical approaches to solve this problem,' said Dr Castell. 'Our aim is to continue to work closely with our collaborators at Northwestern University in the US to solve related materials problems.'

The research was conducted by a team was led by Dr Martin Castell of Oxford University UK and Professor Laurence Marks and Professor Ken Poeppelmeier of Northwestern University, USA.

A report of the research, ‘A homologous series of structures on the surface of SrTiO3 (110)', is published in this week's Nature Materials.


####

About Oxford University
Welcome to the University of Oxford. People from all walks of life and all parts of the world have been visiting us for nine centuries and we are delighted that via this website you are joining that long tradition. Oxford was the first University in the English-speaking world. Our aim is to remain at the forefront of centres of learning, teaching and research.

Oxford’s remarkable global appeal continues to grow. Students from more than a hundred and forty countries and territories make up a student population of over twenty thousand. Over a third comes from outside the United Kingdom.

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Oxford University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Oxford Instruments and Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory collaborate to develop HTS magnet technology components for high field superconducting magnet systems June 29th, 2016

Texas A&M Chemist Says Trapped Electrons To Blame For Lack Of Battery Efficiency: Forget mousetraps — today’s scientists will get the cheese if they manage to build a better battery June 28th, 2016

Building a smart cardiac patch: 'Bionic' cardiac patch could one day monitor and respond to cardiac problems June 28th, 2016

New, better way to build circuits for world's first useful quantum computers June 28th, 2016

Thin films

Novel capping strategy improves stability of perovskite nanocrystals: Study addresses instability issues with organometal-halide perovskites, a promising class of materials for solar cells, LEDs, and other applications June 13th, 2016

New nanomaterial offers promise in bendable, wearable electronic devices: Electroplated polymer makes transparent, highly conductive, ultrathin film June 13th, 2016

Perovskite solar cells surpass 20 percent efficiency: EPFL researchers are pushing the limits of perovskite solar cell performance by exploring the best way to grow these crystals June 13th, 2016

NRL develops new low-defect method to nitrogen dope graphene resulting in tunable bandstructure June 6th, 2016

Possible Futures

Texas A&M Chemist Says Trapped Electrons To Blame For Lack Of Battery Efficiency: Forget mousetraps — today’s scientists will get the cheese if they manage to build a better battery June 28th, 2016

Building a smart cardiac patch: 'Bionic' cardiac patch could one day monitor and respond to cardiac problems June 28th, 2016

New, better way to build circuits for world's first useful quantum computers June 28th, 2016

Yale researchers’ technology turns wasted heat into power June 27th, 2016

Nanoelectronics

Soft decoupling of organic molecules on metal June 23rd, 2016

Tailored DNA shifts electrons into the 'fast lane': DNA nanowire improved by altering sequences June 22nd, 2016

Scientists engineer tunable DNA for electronics applications June 21st, 2016

Novel energy inside a microcircuit chip: VTT developed an efficient nanomaterial-based integrated energy June 10th, 2016

Announcements

Oxford Instruments and Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory collaborate to develop HTS magnet technology components for high field superconducting magnet systems June 29th, 2016

Texas A&M Chemist Says Trapped Electrons To Blame For Lack Of Battery Efficiency: Forget mousetraps — today’s scientists will get the cheese if they manage to build a better battery June 28th, 2016

Building a smart cardiac patch: 'Bionic' cardiac patch could one day monitor and respond to cardiac problems June 28th, 2016

New, better way to build circuits for world's first useful quantum computers June 28th, 2016

Tools

Oxford Instruments and Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory collaborate to develop HTS magnet technology components for high field superconducting magnet systems June 29th, 2016

Texas A&M Chemist Says Trapped Electrons To Blame For Lack Of Battery Efficiency: Forget mousetraps — today’s scientists will get the cheese if they manage to build a better battery June 28th, 2016

FEI Launches Helios G4 DualBeam Series for Materials Science: The Helios G4 DualBeam Series features new capabilities to enable scientists and engineers to answer the most demanding and challenging scientific questions June 27th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Energy

Yale researchers’ technology turns wasted heat into power June 27th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Researchers discover new chemical sensing technique: Technique allows sharper detail -- and more information -- with near infrared light June 24th, 2016

FEI and University of Liverpool Announce QEMSCAN Research Initiative: University of Liverpool will utilize FEI’s QEMSCAN technology to gain a better insight into oil and gas reserves & potentially change the approach to evaluating them June 22nd, 2016

Fuel Cells

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

VentureLab nanotechnology startup wins TechConnect Innovation Award June 2nd, 2016

Tiny probe could produce big improvements in batteries and fuel cells: A new method helps scientists get an atom's level understanding of electrochemical properties June 1st, 2016

Technique improves the efficacy of fuel cells: Research demonstrates a new phase transition from metal to ionic conductor May 18th, 2016

Alliances/Trade associations/Partnerships/Distributorships

FEI and University of Liverpool Announce QEMSCAN Research Initiative: University of Liverpool will utilize FEI’s QEMSCAN technology to gain a better insight into oil and gas reserves & potentially change the approach to evaluating them June 22nd, 2016

French Research Team Helps Extend MRI Detection of Diseases & Lower Health-Care Costs: CEA, INSERM and G2ELab Brings Grenoble Region’s Expertise In Advanced Medicine & Magnetism Applications to H2020 IDentIFY Project June 21st, 2016

Research showing why hierarchy exists will aid the development of artificial intelligence June 13th, 2016

UK NANOSAFETY GROUP publishes 2nd Edition of guidance to support safe working with nanomaterials May 30th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic