Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Metal oxide ‘can transform’

An atomic model of the surface of strontium titanate
An atomic model of the surface of strontium titanate

Abstract:
An international team, including Oxford University scientists, has been investigating what happens to the top layer of atoms on the surface of a material.

Metal oxide ‘can transform’

UK | Posted on February 15th, 2010

The material is strontium titanate: a complex metal oxide that many researchers are interested in because of its ability to split water into hydrogen and oxygen with sunlight and its potential for use in electronic devices.

The team used a variety of techniques including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to directly ‘see' the arrangement of surface atoms. Their observations, reported in this week's Nature Materials, reveal a series of structures with a surprisingly close and orderly arrangement.

‘In most materials, when you create a surface, the top layer of atoms rearrange to different positions from those in the rest of the material. This rearrangement of atoms is usually locked into a particular configuration that will minimise the surface energy.' said Dr Martin Castell of Oxford University's Department of Materials, an author of the paper. ‘However, this is not the case for the surface of strontium titanate that we have been studying. This surface forms a whole family of different structures. Chemists would call these structures a homologous series - something that is routinely observed in the bulk of crystals, but not until now on the surface.'

These ‘transformations' could prove very important to researchers hoping to use strontium titanate in order to build new kinds of nanoelectronic devices or to grow thin films.

The report also suggests that the techniques developed by the researchers could make it possible to predict the surface structures of other oxides.

'We have needed to use many different sophisticated experimental and theoretical approaches to solve this problem,' said Dr Castell. 'Our aim is to continue to work closely with our collaborators at Northwestern University in the US to solve related materials problems.'

The research was conducted by a team was led by Dr Martin Castell of Oxford University UK and Professor Laurence Marks and Professor Ken Poeppelmeier of Northwestern University, USA.

A report of the research, ‘A homologous series of structures on the surface of SrTiO3 (110)', is published in this week's Nature Materials.


####

About Oxford University
Welcome to the University of Oxford. People from all walks of life and all parts of the world have been visiting us for nine centuries and we are delighted that via this website you are joining that long tradition. Oxford was the first University in the English-speaking world. Our aim is to remain at the forefront of centres of learning, teaching and research.

Oxford’s remarkable global appeal continues to grow. Students from more than a hundred and forty countries and territories make up a student population of over twenty thousand. Over a third comes from outside the United Kingdom.

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Oxford University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Making sense of metallic glass February 9th, 2016

Electron's 1-D metallic surface state observed: A step for the prediction of electronic properties of extremely-fine metal nanowires in next-generation semiconductors February 9th, 2016

Nanoparticle therapy that uses LDL and fish oil kills liver cancer cells February 9th, 2016

From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes February 8th, 2016

Thin films

IBS report electric transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries: Scientific team from CINAP/IBS identifies previously undiscovered differences in grain boundaries January 28th, 2016

Weaving a new story for COFS and MOFs: First materials to be woven at the atomic and molecular levels created at Berkeley January 24th, 2016

Teijin to Participate in Nano Tech 2016 January 21st, 2016

Flexible film may lead to phone-sized cancer detector January 18th, 2016

Possible Futures

Electron's 1-D metallic surface state observed: A step for the prediction of electronic properties of extremely-fine metal nanowires in next-generation semiconductors February 9th, 2016

Scientists create laser-activated superconductor February 8th, 2016

Nanoscale cavity strongly links quantum particles: Single photons can quickly modify individual electrons embedded in a semiconductor chip and vice versa February 8th, 2016

A fast solidification process makes material crackle February 8th, 2016

Nanoelectronics

Electron's 1-D metallic surface state observed: A step for the prediction of electronic properties of extremely-fine metal nanowires in next-generation semiconductors February 9th, 2016

The iron stepping stones to better wearable tech without semiconductors February 8th, 2016

Spin dynamics in an atomically thin semi-conductor February 1st, 2016

New type of nanowires, built with natural gas heating: UNIST research team developed a new simple nanowire manufacturing technique February 1st, 2016

Announcements

Making sense of metallic glass February 9th, 2016

Electron's 1-D metallic surface state observed: A step for the prediction of electronic properties of extremely-fine metal nanowires in next-generation semiconductors February 9th, 2016

Nanoparticle therapy that uses LDL and fish oil kills liver cancer cells February 9th, 2016

From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes February 8th, 2016

Tools

Making sense of metallic glass February 9th, 2016

Chiral magnetic effect generates quantum current: Separating left- and right-handed particles in a semi-metallic material produces anomalously high conductivity February 8th, 2016

Metal oxide sandwiches: New option to manipulate properties of interfaces February 8th, 2016

Researchers discover new phase of boron nitride and a new way to create pure c-BN February 5th, 2016

Energy

Canadian physicists discover new properties of superconductivity February 8th, 2016

Host-guest nanowires for efficient water splitting and solar energy storage February 7th, 2016

February 4th, 2016

Putting silicon 'sawdust' in a graphene cage boosts battery performance: Approach could remove major obstacles to increasing the capacity of lithium-ion batteries January 30th, 2016

Fuel Cells

An alternative to platinum: Iron-nitrogen compounds as catalysts in graphene January 28th, 2016

Teijin to Participate in Nano Tech 2016 January 21st, 2016

Fuel cell advance: Research team reports success with low-cost nickel-based catalyst January 18th, 2016

Production of Graphene Oxide Nanosheets to Economize Fuel Cells January 1st, 2016

Alliances/Trade associations/Partnerships/Distributorships

Vesper Collaborates with GLOBALFOUNDRIES to Deliver First Piezoelectric MEMS Microphones: Acoustic sensing company works with top foundry to support mass-market consumer products January 21st, 2016

Imec and Cloudtag Collaborate on High Quality Frictionless Wearables for Lifestyle Coaching: Next-generation health and fitness tracker Cloudtag TrackTM launched at CES 2016 January 7th, 2016

Technical partnership at the top – Oxford Instruments and Zurich Instruments announce a technical collaboration for low temperature physics January 7th, 2016

Production of Graphene Oxide Nanosheets to Economize Fuel Cells January 1st, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic