Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > nGimat Announces Issued Patent

nGimat Announces Issued Patent Covering Tunable Capacitors for Wireless Devices

Atlanta, GA | Posted on May 26, 2006

nGimat Co. announced today the recent issuance of U.S. patent No. 7,031,136 entitled "Variable Capacitors, Composite Materials." This patent covers new tunable capacitors, based on nanomaterials, for nGimat-designed components that are expected to be used in commercial and military wireless equipment. Such components include tunable filters and phase shifters. These components are designed to allow future homeland security communications handsets to tune to multiple frequency bands as well as provide increased security of transmitted signals by beam direction. In addition, the large volume commercial priced components allow for improved signal integrity yielding high data transmission and cleaner calls in congested areas.

Through its core technology of NanoSpraySM Combustion Processing, nGimat is a cost-effective manufacturer and innovator of nanoEngineered MaterialsSM in the following areas: nanopowders, thin films and devices. For more information, please visit www.ngimat.com.

####
Contact:
Sandra Moreland
Moreland Group
sandra@morelandgroup.net
404.851.1535 (office)
404.310.4059 (mobile)

Copyright nGimat

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Materials/Metamaterials

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material April 29th, 2016

Hybrid nanoantennas -- next-generation platform for ultradense data recording April 28th, 2016

Atomic magnets using hydrogen and graphene April 27th, 2016

Announcements

Oxford Instruments Asylum Research and McGill University Announce the McGill AFM Summer School and Workshop, May 12-13, 2016 May 4th, 2016

The intermediates in a chemical reaction photographed 'red-handed' Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have for the first time succeeded in imaging all the steps in a complex organic reaction and have resolved the mechanisms that explain it May 4th, 2016

New tool allows scientists to visualize 'nanoscale' processes May 4th, 2016

FEI Launches Apreo Industry-Leading Versatile, High-Performance SEM: The Apreo SEM provides high-resolution surface information with excellent contrast, and the flexibility to accommodate a large range of samples, applications and conditions May 4th, 2016

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

New tool allows scientists to visualize 'nanoscale' processes May 4th, 2016

System creates on-demand 'nanotube forests,' has potential industry applications April 20th, 2016

Smaller. Cheaper. Better. Iron nitride transformers developed at Sandia could boost energy storage options March 28th, 2016

Correction: Solar fuels: Protective layer for the 'artificial leaf' March 22nd, 2016

Homeland Security

Team builds first quantum cascade laser on silicon: Eliminates the need for an external light source for mid-infrared silicon photonic devices or photonic circuits April 21st, 2016

Nanoporous material's strange "breathing" behavior April 7th, 2016

Sniffing out a dangerous vapor: University of Utah engineers develop material that can sense fuel leaks and fuel-based explosives March 28th, 2016

Detecting and identifying explosives with single test December 10th, 2015

Military

New tool allows scientists to visualize 'nanoscale' processes May 4th, 2016

Making invisible physics visible: The Jayich Lab has created a new sensor technology that captures nanoscale images with high spatial resolution and sensitivity May 2nd, 2016

Nanograft seeded with 3 cell types promotes blood vessel formation to speed wound healing April 27th, 2016

The light stuff: A brand-new way to produce electron spin currents - Colorado State University physicists are the first to demonstrate using non-polarized light to produce a spin voltage in a metal April 26th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic