Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > Solar and Nuclear Energy Expertise to be Enhanced by Research Centers: Los Alamos to establish two DOE-funded Energy Frontier Research Centers

Abstract:
Solar- and nuclear-energy technology advancements from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) could help the nation in its quest to capture viable sources of alternative energy, thanks to funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science.

Solar and Nuclear Energy Expertise to be Enhanced by Research Centers: Los Alamos to establish two DOE-funded Energy Frontier Research Centers

LOS ALAMOS, NM | Posted on May 12th, 2009

Los Alamos will be home to two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs)—each designed to advance scientific research in alternative and renewable energy—through a five-year funding commitment by DOE. Forty-six such centers will be established nationwide at national laboratories, universities, nonprofit organizations, and private firms. The two LANL centers each will receive $3.8 million a year in funding ($19 million each total over the five-year term).

One center, led by Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellow Victor Klimov, will focus on exploiting the physical properties of nanomaterials (compilations of structures so tiny they can't be seen by the human eye) to more efficiently convert solar energy into electric power, or develop materials such as highly efficient solar collectors that could be painted onto a surface to generate electricity. At the center of this research are quantum dots, extremely tiny semi-conducting materials with the ability to generate more than one electrical-energy unit (electron) per single light unit (photon)—an improvement over today's solar cells.

"Engineered nanostructures such as quantum dots have the ability to harvest light more efficiently than silicon," Klimov said. "Quantum dots and similar nanomaterials show tremendous potential in

numerous applications that could make solar energy a more viable alternative energy source."

The other center, led by Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellow Michael Nastasi, will focus on developing robust materials that will be able to withstand extreme conditions such as constant bombardment by radiation or around-the-clock mechanical beatings. To develop these materials, Nastasi and his research team will develop technology to design and engineer bulk materials at the molecular level using nanomaterials.

"The goal of this research is to create materials that will withstand the rigors of next-generation nuclear of reactors to allow them to function reliably and safely for long periods of time with reduced maintenance," Nastasi said. "We will identify inherent characteristics of materials at the atomic level that allow these materials to withstand extreme environments or lead to failure within them. We would then hope to be able to selectively design and create structures at the nanoscale to exploit strengths or eliminate weaknesses to make these materials particularly suited to surviving in extreme environments."

In addition to leading two centers, LANL will participate in five others nationwide. Funding for the two centers does not come from the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. More information about the EFRCs can be found at http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/EFRC.html.

####

About Los Alamos National Laboratory
Los Alamos National Laboratory, a multidisciplinary research institution engaged in strategic science on behalf of national security, is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, a team composed of Bechtel National, the University of California, The Babcock & Wilcox Company, and the Washington Division of URS for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration.

Los Alamos enhances national security by ensuring the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile, developing technologies to reduce threats from weapons of mass destruction, and solving problems related to energy, environment, infrastructure, health, and global security concerns.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
AMES E. RICKMAN
505-665-9203

Copyright © Los Alamos National Laboratory

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

The National Space Society Congratulates Blue Origin and Jeff Bezos for the Spectacular First Crewed Flight of the New Shepard: Well-Tested Suborbital Tourist Rocket Soars to 63 Miles; Opens New Frontiers July 21st, 2021

Unconventional superconductor acts the part of a promising quantum computing platform: If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck. July 16th, 2021

Unlocking efficient light-energy conversion with stable coordination nanosheets: Scientists design a high-performance, self-powered, UV photodetector using 2D nanosheets that show record photocurrent stability under air exposure July 16th, 2021

The virus trap: Hollow nano-objects made of DNA could trap viruses and render them harmless July 16th, 2021

Primers with graphene nanotubes offer a new solution for electrostatic painting of automotive parts July 16th, 2021

Laboratories

Scientists take first snapshots of ultrafast switching in a quantum electronic device: They discover a short-lived state that could lead to faster and more energy-efficient computing devices July 16th, 2021

Argonne researchers use AI to optimize a popular material coating technique in real time June 25th, 2021

Putting functional proteins in their place: Using DNA-based assembly, scientists developed a method for creating designed and biologically active 2-D and 3-D protein arrays, which show promise for applications in structural biology, biomaterials, nanomedicine, and biocatalysis June 25th, 2021

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

The virus trap: Hollow nano-objects made of DNA could trap viruses and render them harmless July 16th, 2021

Scientists create rechargeable swimming microrobots using oil and water July 16th, 2021

Scientists take first snapshots of ultrafast switching in a quantum electronic device: They discover a short-lived state that could lead to faster and more energy-efficient computing devices July 16th, 2021

Stress-free path to stress-free metallic films paves the way for next-gen circuitry: Optimized sputtering technique helps minimize stress in tungsten thin films July 4th, 2021

Announcements

The National Space Society Congratulates Blue Origin and Jeff Bezos for the Spectacular First Crewed Flight of the New Shepard: Well-Tested Suborbital Tourist Rocket Soars to 63 Miles; Opens New Frontiers July 21st, 2021

Scientists create rechargeable swimming microrobots using oil and water July 16th, 2021

Scientists take first snapshots of ultrafast switching in a quantum electronic device: They discover a short-lived state that could lead to faster and more energy-efficient computing devices July 16th, 2021

Researchers discover a new inorganic material with lowest thermal conductivity ever reported July 16th, 2021

Energy

Removing the lead hazard from perovskite solar cells July 16th, 2021

Researchers discover a new inorganic material with lowest thermal conductivity ever reported July 16th, 2021

Pushing the boundaries of colloidal quantum dots by making their sizes equal: Scientists demonstrate the relationship between optoelectronic performance and size uniformity in perovskite colloidal quantum dots June 25th, 2021

Light-harvesting nanoparticle catalysts show promise in quest for renewable carbon-based fuels June 25th, 2021

Quantum Dots/Rods

Pushing the boundaries of colloidal quantum dots by making their sizes equal: Scientists demonstrate the relationship between optoelectronic performance and size uniformity in perovskite colloidal quantum dots June 25th, 2021

Theory describes quantum phenomenon in nanomaterials: Osaka City University scientists have developed mathematical formulas to describe the current and fluctuations of strongly correlated electrons in quantum dots. Their theoretical predictions could soon be tested experimentally December 25th, 2020

Improving quantum dot interactions, one layer at a time: Scientists have found a way to control an interaction between quantum dots that could lead to more efficient solar cells November 20th, 2020

Breakthrough quantum-dot transistors create a flexible alternative to conventional electronics: Quantum dot logic circuits provide the long-sought building blocks for innovative devices, including printable electronics, flexible displays, and medical diagnostics October 30th, 2020

Solar/Photovoltaic

Removing the lead hazard from perovskite solar cells July 16th, 2021

Changing a 2D material's symmetry can unlock its promise: Jian Shi Research Group engineers material into promising optoelectronic June 18th, 2021

Molecular coating enhances organic solar cells June 11th, 2021

New form of silicon could enable next-gen electronic and energy devices: Novel crystalline form of silicon could potentially be used to create next-generation electronic and energy devices June 4th, 2021

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project