Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > New optical imaging system could be deployed to find tiny tumors: Near-infrared technology pinpoints fluorescent probes deep within living tissue; may be used to detect cancer earlier

MIT researchers have devised a way to simultaneously image in multiple wavelengths of near-infrared light, allowing them to determine the depth of particles emitting different wavelengths.

Image courtesy of the researchers
MIT researchers have devised a way to simultaneously image in multiple wavelengths of near-infrared light, allowing them to determine the depth of particles emitting different wavelengths. Image courtesy of the researchers

Abstract:
Many types of cancer could be more easily treated if they were detected at an earlier stage. MIT researchers have now developed an imaging system, named "DOLPHIN," which could enable them to find tiny tumors, as small as a couple of hundred cells, deep within the body.

New optical imaging system could be deployed to find tiny tumors: Near-infrared technology pinpoints fluorescent probes deep within living tissue; may be used to detect cancer earlier

Cambridge, MA | Posted on March 8th, 2019

In a new study, the researchers used their imaging system, which relies on near-infrared light, to track a 0.1-millimeter fluorescent probe through the digestive tract of a living mouse. They also showed that they can detect a signal to a tissue depth of 8 centimeters, far deeper than any existing biomedical optical imaging technique.

The researchers hope to adapt their imaging technology for early diagnosis of ovarian and other cancers that are currently difficult to detect until late stages.

"We want to be able to find cancer much earlier," says Angela Belcher, the James Mason Crafts Professor of Biological Engineering and Materials Science at MIT and a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, and the newly-appointed head of MIT's Department of Biological Engineering. "Our goal is to find tiny tumors, and do so in a noninvasive way."

Belcher is the senior author of the study, which appears in the March 7 issue of Scientific Reports. Xiangnan Dang, a former MIT postdoc, and Neelkanth Bardhan, a Mazumdar-Shaw International Oncology Fellow, are the lead authors of the study. Other authors include research scientists Jifa Qi and Ngozi Eze, former postdoc Li Gu, postdoc Ching-Wei Lin, graduate student Swati Kataria, and Paula Hammond, the David H. Koch Professor of Engineering, head of MIT's Department of Chemical Engineering, and a member of the Koch Institute.

Deeper imaging

Existing methods for imaging tumors all have limitations that prevent them from being useful for early cancer diagnosis. Most have a tradeoff between resolution and depth of imaging, and none of the optical imaging techniques can image deeper than about 3 centimeters into tissue. Commonly used scans such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can image through the whole body; however, they can't reliably identify tumors until they reach about 1 centimeter in size.

Belcher's lab set out to develop new optical methods for cancer imaging several years ago, when they joined the Koch Institute. They wanted to develop technology that could image very small groups of cells deep within tissue and do so without any kind of radioactive labeling.

Near-infrared light, which has wavelengths from 900 to 1700 nanometers, is well-suited to tissue imaging because light with longer wavelengths doesn't scatter as much as when it strikes objects, which allows the light to penetrate deeper into the tissue. To take advantage of this, the researchers used an approach known as hyperspectral imaging, which enables simultaneous imaging in multiple wavelengths of light.

The researchers tested their system with a variety of near-infrared fluorescent light-emitting probes, mainly sodium yttrium fluoride nanoparticles that have rare earth elements such as erbium, holmium, or praseodymium added through a process called doping. Depending on the choice of the doping element, each of these particles emits near-infrared fluorescent light of different wavelengths.

Using algorithms that they developed, the researchers can analyze the data from the hyperspectral scan to identify the sources of fluorescent light of different wavelengths, which allows them to determine the location of a particular probe. By further analyzing light from narrower wavelength bands within the entire near-IR spectrum, the researchers can also determine the depth at which a probe is located. The researchers call their system "DOLPHIN", which stands for "Detection of Optically Luminescent Probes using Hyperspectral and diffuse Imaging in Near-infrared."

To demonstrate the potential usefulness of this system, the researchers tracked a 0.1-millimeter-sized cluster of fluorescent nanoparticles that was swallowed and then traveled through the digestive tract of a living mouse. These probes could be modified so that they target and fluorescently label specific cancer cells.

"In terms of practical applications, this technique would allow us to non-invasively track a 0.1-millimeter-sized fluorescently-labeled tumor, which is a cluster of about a few hundred cells. To our knowledge, no one has been able to do this previously using optical imaging techniques," Bardhan says.

Earlier detection

The researchers also demonstrated that they could inject fluorescent particles into the body of a mouse or a rat and then image through the entire animal, which requires imaging to a depth of about 4 centimeters, to determine where the particles ended up. And in tests with human tissue-mimics and animal tissue, they were able to locate the probes to a depth of up to 8 centimeters, depending on the type of tissue.

This kind of system could be used with any fluorescent probe that emits light in the near-infrared spectrum, including some that are already FDA-approved, the researchers say. The researchers are also working on adapting the imaging system so that it could reveal intrinsic differences in tissue contrast, including signatures of tumor cells, without any kind of fluorescent label.

In ongoing work, they are using a related version of this imaging system to try to detect ovarian tumors at an early stage. Ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed very late because there is no easy way to detect it when the tumors are still small.

"Ovarian cancer is a terrible disease, and it gets diagnosed so late because the symptoms are so nondescript," Belcher says. "We want a way to follow recurrence of the tumors, and eventually a way to find and follow early tumors when they first go down the path to cancer or metastasis. This is one of the first steps along the way in terms of developing this technology."

The researchers have also begun working on adapting this type of imaging to detect other types of cancer such as pancreatic cancer, brain cancer, and melanoma.

###

The research was funded by the Koch Institute Frontier Research Program, the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, the Koch Institute Support (core) Grant from the National Cancer Institute, the NCI Center for Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, and the Bridge Project.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Sarah McDonnell

617-253-8923

Copyright © Massachusetts Institute of Technology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment August 16th, 2019

Optofluidic chip with nanopore 'smart gate' developed for single molecule analysis: Programmable device enables on-demand delivery of individual biomolecules with feedback-controlled gating for high-throughput analysis August 16th, 2019

ULVAC Launches Revolutionary PZT Piezoelectric Thin-film Process Technology and HVM Solution for MEMS Sensors/Actuators: Enabling Reliable, High-quality Film Production for Next Generation Devices August 16th, 2019

RIT to upgrade Semiconductor and Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory through $1 million state grant: Upgrades to clean room will enhance university’s research capabilities in photonics, quantum technologies and smart systems August 16th, 2019

Imaging

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment August 16th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment August 16th, 2019

Optofluidic chip with nanopore 'smart gate' developed for single molecule analysis: Programmable device enables on-demand delivery of individual biomolecules with feedback-controlled gating for high-throughput analysis August 16th, 2019

Damaged hearts rewired with nanotube fibers: Texas Heart doctors confirm Rice-made, conductive carbon threads are electrical bridges August 14th, 2019

You're not so tough, h-BN: Rice University chemists find new path to make strong 2D material better for applications August 14th, 2019

Possible Futures

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment August 16th, 2019

ULVAC Launches Revolutionary PZT Piezoelectric Thin-film Process Technology and HVM Solution for MEMS Sensors/Actuators: Enabling Reliable, High-quality Film Production for Next Generation Devices August 16th, 2019

RIT to upgrade Semiconductor and Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory through $1 million state grant: Upgrades to clean room will enhance university’s research capabilities in photonics, quantum technologies and smart systems August 16th, 2019

Probing the Origin of Alzheimer’s . . . with Transistors: Novel high-sensitivity detector could aid in early diagnosis August 15th, 2019

Nanomedicine

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment August 16th, 2019

Optofluidic chip with nanopore 'smart gate' developed for single molecule analysis: Programmable device enables on-demand delivery of individual biomolecules with feedback-controlled gating for high-throughput analysis August 16th, 2019

RIT to upgrade Semiconductor and Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory through $1 million state grant: Upgrades to clean room will enhance university’s research capabilities in photonics, quantum technologies and smart systems August 16th, 2019

Probing the Origin of Alzheimer’s . . . with Transistors: Novel high-sensitivity detector could aid in early diagnosis August 15th, 2019

Discoveries

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment August 16th, 2019

Optofluidic chip with nanopore 'smart gate' developed for single molecule analysis: Programmable device enables on-demand delivery of individual biomolecules with feedback-controlled gating for high-throughput analysis August 16th, 2019

Probing the Origin of Alzheimer’s . . . with Transistors: Novel high-sensitivity detector could aid in early diagnosis August 15th, 2019

Damaged hearts rewired with nanotube fibers: Texas Heart doctors confirm Rice-made, conductive carbon threads are electrical bridges August 14th, 2019

Announcements

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment August 16th, 2019

Optofluidic chip with nanopore 'smart gate' developed for single molecule analysis: Programmable device enables on-demand delivery of individual biomolecules with feedback-controlled gating for high-throughput analysis August 16th, 2019

ULVAC Launches Revolutionary PZT Piezoelectric Thin-film Process Technology and HVM Solution for MEMS Sensors/Actuators: Enabling Reliable, High-quality Film Production for Next Generation Devices August 16th, 2019

RIT to upgrade Semiconductor and Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory through $1 million state grant: Upgrades to clean room will enhance university’s research capabilities in photonics, quantum technologies and smart systems August 16th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment August 16th, 2019

Optofluidic chip with nanopore 'smart gate' developed for single molecule analysis: Programmable device enables on-demand delivery of individual biomolecules with feedback-controlled gating for high-throughput analysis August 16th, 2019

Probing the Origin of Alzheimer’s . . . with Transistors: Novel high-sensitivity detector could aid in early diagnosis August 15th, 2019

Damaged hearts rewired with nanotube fibers: Texas Heart doctors confirm Rice-made, conductive carbon threads are electrical bridges August 14th, 2019

Tools

uSEE breakthrough unlocks the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment August 16th, 2019

Cellulose nanofibers to improve the sensitivity of lateral flow tests August 7th, 2019

How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals: Researchers try a trick for complete 3D analysis of submicron crystals August 3rd, 2019

Nanoscribe expands its worldwide presence: Specialist for 3D nano and micro fabrication opens US subsidiary for service and sales July 31st, 2019

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Damaged hearts rewired with nanotube fibers: Texas Heart doctors confirm Rice-made, conductive carbon threads are electrical bridges August 14th, 2019

You're not so tough, h-BN: Rice University chemists find new path to make strong 2D material better for applications August 14th, 2019

Researchers embrace imperfection to improve biomolecule transport August 8th, 2019

RIT awarded NSF funding to conceptualize Quantum Photonic Institute: RIT will develop plan for open-access Quantum Foundry for quantum photonic circuits August 7th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project