Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Unmasking corrosion to design better protective thin films for metals: Researchers from three universities team up to analyze oxide films at atomic level

The research has implications for everything from nuts and bolts to turbine engines.
The research has implications for everything from nuts and bolts to turbine engines.

Abstract:
•Study shows anti-corrosive oxides develop new structures and compositions depending on how fast the film develops
•Findings could help slow age-old problem of corrosion
•‘Opens the door to drastically new ways of protecting metals,’ researcher says

Unmasking corrosion to design better protective thin films for metals: Researchers from three universities team up to analyze oxide films at atomic level

Evanston, IL | Posted on October 3rd, 2018

Corrosion is an age-old problem that is estimated to cost about $1 trillion a year, or about 5 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product. Corrosion of metals can be particularly bad, but fortunately they are normally protected from catastrophic damage by naturally forming, super-thin oxide films.



Traditionally, these protective films have been viewed as simple oxides of well-anticipated compounds, but new work from scientists at Northwestern University, the University of Virginia and the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals dramatic new insights into these oxide films.



Using state-of-the-art experimental techniques and theoretical modeling, the scientists were able to analyze oxide films at the atomic level, deciphering how the atoms are arranged in the oxides.



Their findings? The protective films develop new structures and compositions that depend on how fast the oxide film grows. The study’s authors say their findings could provide clues about how to make the protective films better -- perhaps much, much better.



It’s a breakthrough that could have implications for everything from nuts and bolts to high-technology batteries and turbine engines.



“This changes many things about how we understand these oxide films and opens the door to drastically new ways of protecting metals,” said Laurence Marks, professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering, who led the study. “We now know that there are ways to predict the chemical composition of these films, something we can exploit so the protective films last much longer.”



The study was published today (Oct. 3) by the journal Physical Review Letters.



“We now have more routes than ever to control and tune oxides to protect materials,” said John Scully, the Charles Henderson Chaired Professor and Chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Virginia and one of the study’s authors.



“This provides key information about how to design new materials that will corrode far less,” said Northwestern’s Peter Voorhees, another of the study’s authors. Voorhees is the Frank C. Engelhart Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern Engineering.



The team studied, in detail, the oxides that form on alloys composed of nickel and chromium, which are widely used in a variety of products, such as the heating elements of a household toaster or in aircraft engines.



These oxides are also used for applications when there is water present, such as in dental implants. It has long been known that these oxides work when hot and resist corrosion in the mouth because of the formation of an oxide of chromium. It was assumed that the nickel formed a separate oxide, or in some cases dissolved away in the body. The team found something unexpected -- that the oxide was not just chromium and oxygen, but instead contained a very large number of nickel atoms.



Why? Because the nickel atoms do not have time to escape from the oxide, becoming captured inside it. The fraction that is captured depends upon how fast the oxide grows. If it grows very slowly, the nickel atoms can escape. If it grows very fast, they cannot.



This occurs both when the metals are reacting with oxygen from the air at high temperatures, as well as when they are reacting with water in ships or in dental implants. The atoms that are captured in the oxide change many of the properties, the study’s authors say.



The findings mean it is possible to deliberately trap atoms into these oxides in new ways, and thus change how they behave.



“We are close to the limits of what we can do with aircraft engines, as one example,” said John Perepezko, the IBM-Bascom Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and another of the study’s authors. “This new vision of protective oxide formation leads to many new ways one could build better engines.”

The title of the paper is “Non-equilibrium Solute Capture in Passivating Oxide Films.”



The research was supported by an Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) award (grant number N00014-16-1-2280).

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Megan Fellman
847-491-3115


Source contacts:
Laurence Marks


John Scully

Copyright © Northwestern University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Researchers reverse the flow of time on IBM's quantum computer March 14th, 2019

When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum: A new study led by Berkeley Lab reveals how aligned layers of atomically thin semiconductors can yield an exotic new quantum material March 12th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Begins Dosing in Phase 1 Study of ARO-APOC3 for Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia March 11th, 2019

Possible Futures

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Discoveries

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields: MIT researchers find a new way to make nanoscale measurements of fields in more than one dimension March 15th, 2019

Materials/Metamaterials

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Now made in Japan – Asian battery manufacturers welcome highly conductive nanotube additive March 7th, 2019

Can a flowing liquid-like material maintain its structural order like crystals? February 27th, 2019

Super-light, super-insulating ceramic aerogel keeps the hottest temperatures at bay February 17th, 2019

Announcements

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields: MIT researchers find a new way to make nanoscale measurements of fields in more than one dimension March 15th, 2019

Military

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields: MIT researchers find a new way to make nanoscale measurements of fields in more than one dimension March 15th, 2019

Lightweight metal foams become bone hard and explosion proof after being nanocoated March 14th, 2019

When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum: A new study led by Berkeley Lab reveals how aligned layers of atomically thin semiconductors can yield an exotic new quantum material March 12th, 2019

Aerospace/Space

Lightweight metal foams become bone hard and explosion proof after being nanocoated March 14th, 2019

Oxford Instruments and partners launch EU Horizon 2020 project ULISSES: Air sensors for everyone, everywhere March 7th, 2019

NSS Congratulates SpaceX and NASA on Docking Dragon 2 Spacecraft to International Space Station: A historic milestone in commercial space was achieved on March 3 March 7th, 2019

Avoiding the Crack of Doom: New imaging technique reveals how mechanical damage begins at the molecular scale February 25th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project