Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Measuring the nanoworld

Researchers from around the world established a benchmark for the FRET technology by measuring distances within DNA molecules with sub-nanometer precision.

CREDIT
Source: Hugo Sanabria, Nandakumar Chedikulathu Vishnu/Universität Clemson
Researchers from around the world established a benchmark for the FRET technology by measuring distances within DNA molecules with sub-nanometer precision. CREDIT Source: Hugo Sanabria, Nandakumar Chedikulathu Vishnu/Universität Clemson

Abstract:
A worldwide study involving 20 laboratories has established and standardized a method to measure exact distances within individual biomolecules, down to the scale of one millionth of the width of a human hair. The new method represents a major improvement of a technology called single-molecule FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer), in which the movement and interaction of fluorescently labelled molecules can be monitored in real time even in living cells. So far, the technology has mainly been used to report changes in relative distances - for instance, whether the molecules moved closer together or farther apart. Prof. Dr. Thorsten Hugel of the Institute of Physical Chemistry and the BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies is one of the lead scientists of the study, which was recently published in Nature Methods.

Measuring the nanoworld

Freiburg, Germany | Posted on September 4th, 2018

FRET works similarly to proximity sensors in cars: the closer the object is, the louder or more frequent the beeps become. Instead of relying on acoustics, FRET is based on proximity-dependent changes in the fluorescent light emitted from two dyes and is detected by sensitive microscopes. The technology has revolutionised the analysis of the movement and interactions of biomolecules in living cells.

Hugel and colleagues envisioned that once a FRET standard had been established, unknown distances could be determined with high confidence. By working together, the 20 laboratories involved in the study refined the method in such a way that scientists using different microscopes and analysis software obtained the same distances, even in the sub-nanometer range.

"The absolute distance information that can be acquired with this method now enables us to accurately assign conformations in dynamic biomolecules, or even to determine their structures", says Thorsten Hugel, who headed the study together with Dr. Tim Craggs (University of Sheffield/Great-Britain), Prof. Dr. Claus Seidel (University of Düsseldorf) and Prof. Dr. Jens Michaelis (University of Ulm). Such dynamic structural information will yield a better understanding of the molecular machines and processes that are the basis of life.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Prof. Dr. Thorsten Hugel

Copyright © University of Freiburg

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Original publication:

Related News Press

News and information

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Imaging

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields: MIT researchers find a new way to make nanoscale measurements of fields in more than one dimension March 15th, 2019

Lightweight metal foams become bone hard and explosion proof after being nanocoated March 14th, 2019

New optical imaging system could be deployed to find tiny tumors: Near-infrared technology pinpoints fluorescent probes deep within living tissue; may be used to detect cancer earlier March 8th, 2019

New blueprint for understanding, predicting and optimizing complex nanoparticles: Guidelines have the potential to transform the fields of optoelectronics, bio-imaging and energy harvesting March 1st, 2019

Possible Futures

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Molecular Machines

Kanazawa University research: A closed cage-like molecule that can be opened January 22nd, 2019

Insights into magnetic bacteria may guide research into medical nanorobots December 12th, 2018

How to mass produce cell-sized robots: Technique from MIT could lead to tiny, self-powered devices for environmental, industrial, or medical monitoring October 24th, 2018

How swarms of nanomachines could improve the efficiency of any machine September 28th, 2018

Molecular Nanotechnology

The feature size and functional range of molecular electronic devices: Monitoring the transition from tunneling leakage current to molecular tunneling December 16th, 2018

Insights into magnetic bacteria may guide research into medical nanorobots December 12th, 2018

How to mass produce cell-sized robots: Technique from MIT could lead to tiny, self-powered devices for environmental, industrial, or medical monitoring October 24th, 2018

How swarms of nanomachines could improve the efficiency of any machine September 28th, 2018

Sensors

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields: MIT researchers find a new way to make nanoscale measurements of fields in more than one dimension March 15th, 2019

Oxford Instruments and partners launch EU Horizon 2020 project ULISSES: Air sensors for everyone, everywhere March 7th, 2019

With nanopore sensing, VCU physics researchers detect subtle changes in single particles: The researchers' findings 'open the door to observe all kinds of interesting phenomenon on nanosurfaces,' an area of great interest to chemists February 21st, 2019

CEA-Leti & Stanford Target Edge-AI Apps with Breakthrough Memory Cell: Paper at ISSCC 2019 Presents Proof-of-Concept Multi-Bit Chip That Overcomes NVM’s Read/Write, Latency and Integration Challenges February 20th, 2019

Discoveries

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Announcements

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Research partnerships

Fish-Inspired Material Changes Color Using Nanocolumns March 18th, 2019

Lightweight metal foams become bone hard and explosion proof after being nanocoated March 14th, 2019

When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum: A new study led by Berkeley Lab reveals how aligned layers of atomically thin semiconductors can yield an exotic new quantum material March 12th, 2019

AIM Photonics Attends OFC 2019—the Optical Networking and Communication Conference & Exhibition to Share World-Class Capabilities and Partnership Opportunity Updates February 28th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project