Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology

Specialist research equipment and reseach images.
CREDIT
Scienta Omicron
Specialist research equipment and reseach images. CREDIT Scienta Omicron

Abstract:
Research by scientists at Swansea University is helping to meet the challenge of incorporating nanoscale structures into future semiconductor devices that will create new technologies and impact on all aspects of everyday life.

New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology

Swansea, UK | Posted on January 20th, 2017

Dr Alex Lord and Professor Steve Wilks from the Centre for Nanohealth led the collaborative research published in Nano Letters. The research team looked at ways to engineer electrical contact technology on minute scales with simple and effective modifications to nanowires that can be used to develop enhanced devices based on the nanomaterials. Well-defined electrical contacts are essential for any electrical circuit and electronic device because they control the flow of electricity that is fundamental to the operational capability.

Everyday materials that are being scaled down to the size of nanometres (one million times smaller than a millimetre on a standard ruler) by scientists on a global scale are seen as the future of electronic devices. The scientific and engineering advances are leading to new technologies such as energy producing clothing to power our personal gadgets and sensors to monitor our health and the surrounding environment.

Over the coming years this will make a massive contribution to the explosion that is the Internet of Things connecting everything from our homes to our cars into a web of communication. All of these new technologies require similar advances in electrical circuits and especially electrical contacts that allow the devices to work correctly with electricity.

Professor Steve Wilks said: "Nanotechnology has delivered new materials and new technologies and the applications of nanotechnology will continue to expand over the coming decades with much of its usefulness stemming from effects that occur at the atomic- or nano-scale. With the advent of nanotechnology, new technologies have emerged such as chemical and biological sensors, quantum computing, energy harvesting, lasers, and environmental and photon-detectors, but there is a pressing need to develop new electrical contact preparation techniques to ensure these devices become an everyday reality."

"Traditional methods of engineering electrical contacts have been applied to nanomaterials but often neglect the nanoscale effects that nanoscientists have worked so hard to uncover. Currently, there isn't a design toolbox to make electrical contacts of chosen properties to nanomaterials and in some respects the research is lagging behind our potential application of the enhanced materials."

The Swansea research team1 used specialist experimental equipment and collaborated with Professor Quentin Ramasse of the SuperSTEM Laboratory, Science and Facilities Technology Council. The scientists were able to physically interact with the nanostructures and measure how the nanoscale modifications affected the electrical performance.2

Their experiments found for the first time, that simple changes to the catalyst edge can turn-on or turn-off the dominant electrical conduction and most importantly reveal a powerful technique that will allow nanoengineers to select the properties of manufacturable nanowire devices.

Dr Lord said: "The experiments had a simple premise but were challenging to optimise and allow atomic-scale imaging of the interfaces. However, it was essential to this study and will allow many more materials to be investigated in a similar way."

"This research now gives us an understanding of these new effects and will allow engineers in the future to reliably produce electrical contacts to these nanomaterials which is essential for the materials to be used in the technologies of tomorrow.

"In the near future this work can help enhance current nanotechnology devices such as biosensors and also lead to new technologies such as Transient Electronics that are devices that diminish and vanish without a trace which is an essential property when they are applied as diagnostic tools inside the human body."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Delyth Purchase

Copyright © Swansea University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

RELATED JOURNAL ARTICLE:

Related News Press

News and information

NUS researchers develop stretchable, self-healing and illuminating material for ‘invincible’ light-emitting devices: Promising applications include damage-proof flexible display screens and illuminating electronic skin for autonomous soft robots May 31st, 2020

The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed: A team of scientists is working to create brain-like memristive systems providing the highest degree of adaptability for implementing compact and efficient neural interfaces, new-generation robotics, artificial intelligence, perso May 29th, 2020

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane: The new method, embedded ink writing (EIW), enables direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators May 29th, 2020

Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique: Advanced nanotechnology provides 'naked eye' visual detection of virus in 10 minutes May 29th, 2020

Lab-on-a-chip

RIT researchers build micro-device to detect bacteria, viruses: New process improves lab-on-chip devices to isolate drug-resistant strains of bacterial infection, viruses April 17th, 2020

Silicon-graphene hybrid plasmonic waveguide photodetectors beyond 1.55 μm March 13th, 2020

Moving diagnostics out of the lab and into your hand: Electrochemical sensor platform technology could enable portable, multiplexed, point-of-care diagnostics for a wide range of applications November 11th, 2019

Trapping and moving tiny particles using light September 24th, 2019

Possible Futures

NUS researchers develop stretchable, self-healing and illuminating material for ‘invincible’ light-emitting devices: Promising applications include damage-proof flexible display screens and illuminating electronic skin for autonomous soft robots May 31st, 2020

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications: Chips can be programmed after fabrication for use in communication, computing or biomedical applications May 29th, 2020

The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed: A team of scientists is working to create brain-like memristive systems providing the highest degree of adaptability for implementing compact and efficient neural interfaces, new-generation robotics, artificial intelligence, perso May 29th, 2020

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane: The new method, embedded ink writing (EIW), enables direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators May 29th, 2020

Chip Technology

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications: Chips can be programmed after fabrication for use in communication, computing or biomedical applications May 29th, 2020

A stitch in time: How a quantum physicist invented new code from old tricks: Error suppression opens pathway to universal quantum computing May 22nd, 2020

Oriented hexagonal boron nitride foster new type of information carrier May 22nd, 2020

Observation of intervalley transitions can boost valleytronic science and technology: UC Riverside-led research shows these transitions can emit light May 15th, 2020

Nanomedicine

The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed: A team of scientists is working to create brain-like memristive systems providing the highest degree of adaptability for implementing compact and efficient neural interfaces, new-generation robotics, artificial intelligence, perso May 29th, 2020

Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique: Advanced nanotechnology provides 'naked eye' visual detection of virus in 10 minutes May 29th, 2020

2D sandwich sees molecules with clarity: Rice University engineers adapt 2D ‘sandwich’ for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy May 15th, 2020

Twisting 2D materials uncovers their superpowers: Researchers have developed a completely new method for twisting atomically thin materials, paving the way for applications of 'twistronics' based on tunable 2D materials May 12th, 2020

Sensors

Surrey reveals its implantable biosensor that operates without batteries May 22nd, 2020

Making quantum 'waves' in ultrathin materials: Study co-led by Berkeley Lab reveals how wavelike plasmons could power up a new class of sensing and photochemical technologies at the nanoscale May 15th, 2020

Twisting 2D materials uncovers their superpowers: Researchers have developed a completely new method for twisting atomically thin materials, paving the way for applications of 'twistronics' based on tunable 2D materials May 12th, 2020

MOF material offers optical sensing of NO2 pollutant for air quality measurements April 30th, 2020

Discoveries

NUS researchers develop stretchable, self-healing and illuminating material for ‘invincible’ light-emitting devices: Promising applications include damage-proof flexible display screens and illuminating electronic skin for autonomous soft robots May 31st, 2020

Argonne researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles May 29th, 2020

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications: Chips can be programmed after fabrication for use in communication, computing or biomedical applications May 29th, 2020

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane: The new method, embedded ink writing (EIW), enables direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators May 29th, 2020

Announcements

NUS researchers develop stretchable, self-healing and illuminating material for ‘invincible’ light-emitting devices: Promising applications include damage-proof flexible display screens and illuminating electronic skin for autonomous soft robots May 31st, 2020

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications: Chips can be programmed after fabrication for use in communication, computing or biomedical applications May 29th, 2020

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane: The new method, embedded ink writing (EIW), enables direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators May 29th, 2020

Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique: Advanced nanotechnology provides 'naked eye' visual detection of virus in 10 minutes May 29th, 2020

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

Argonne researchers create active material out of microscopic spinning particles May 29th, 2020

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications: Chips can be programmed after fabrication for use in communication, computing or biomedical applications May 29th, 2020

The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed: A team of scientists is working to create brain-like memristive systems providing the highest degree of adaptability for implementing compact and efficient neural interfaces, new-generation robotics, artificial intelligence, perso May 29th, 2020

SUTD developed a simple method to print planar microstructures of polysiloxane: The new method, embedded ink writing (EIW), enables direct writing of polysiloxane which helps in the fabrication of microfluidic devices, flexible wearables, and soft actuators May 29th, 2020

Nanobiotechnology

The concept of creating «brain-on-chip» revealed: A team of scientists is working to create brain-like memristive systems providing the highest degree of adaptability for implementing compact and efficient neural interfaces, new-generation robotics, artificial intelligence, perso May 29th, 2020

Researchers develop experimental rapid COVID-19 test using nanoparticle technique: Advanced nanotechnology provides 'naked eye' visual detection of virus in 10 minutes May 29th, 2020

2D sandwich sees molecules with clarity: Rice University engineers adapt 2D ‘sandwich’ for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy May 15th, 2020

Chemistry breakthrough could speed up drug development: Scientists have successfully developed a new technique to reliably grow crystals of organic soluble molecules from nanoscale droplets, unlocking the potential of accelerated new drug development May 8th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project