Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International



Home > Press > 'Additive manufacturing' could greatly improve diabetes management

To create new types of sensors, gold films are patterned onto a substrate using microcontract printing and etching.
CREDIT: Image courtesy of Oregon State University
To create new types of sensors, gold films are patterned onto a substrate using microcontract printing and etching.

CREDIT: Image courtesy of Oregon State University

Abstract:
Engineers at Oregon State University have used "additive manufacturing" to create an improved type of glucose sensor for patients with Type 1diabetes, part of a system that should work better, cost less and be more comfortable for the patient.

'Additive manufacturing' could greatly improve diabetes management

Corvallis, OR | Posted on March 17th, 2015

A key advance is use of electrohydrodynamic jet, or "e-jet" printing, to make the sensor. Conceptually, e-jet printing is a little like an inexpensive inkjet printer - but it creates much finer drop sizes and works with biological materials such as enzymes, instead of ink.

The technology would create an "artificial pancreas" using a single point of bodily entry, or catheter, instead of existing systems that require four entry points, usually in a type of belt worn around the waist.

"This technology and other work that could evolve from it should improve a patient's health, comfort and diabetes management," said Greg Herman, an OSU associate professor of chemical engineering.

These systems provide constant monitoring of blood glucose concentrations and are matched with portable infusion pumps. They control delivery of the hormones insulin and glucagon, and maintain safe levels of glucose in the blood.

The findings have been reported in the ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology, in work supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Type 1 diabetes, which used to be called juvenile diabetes, can lead to serious health complications unless glucose levels are carefully controlled. Problems can include retinopathy, blindness, neuropathy, kidney and cardiac disease.

Researchers say that this system may ultimately prove useful with Type 2 diabetes as well, and that it has the capability of making other biological measurements, beyond just blood sugar.

Diabetes is a global, rapidly increasing health problem. In 2014, the International Diabetes Federation estimated that 387 million people around the world had some type of diabetes, and that number is expected to rise to 592 million within 20 years. The global economic cost last year was estimated at $612 billion, and the agency reported that more than three out of four people with diabetes live in low or middle-income countries.

From an engineering perspective, the new approach is more precise, less intrusive, uses fewer processing steps, avoids waste and costs less.

"These are disposable devices that only last about a week and then need to be replaced," Herman said. "Some other approaches used to make them might waste up to 90 percent of the materials being used, and that's a problem in a throw-away sensor. It's also important to keep costs as low as possible, and printing systems are inherently low-cost."

Another important advance was the use of plastic substrates, which are the same thickness as kitchen plastic wrap, so that the sensors can be wrapped around a catheter.

"The challenges of making these sensors on such thin plastic films were difficult to overcome, but we found that additive manufacturing approaches simplified the process, and should lead to much lower costs," said John Conley, an OSU professor of electrical engineering.

A patent has been applied for on the technology by OSU and Pacific Diabetes Technologies of Portland, Ore., which is working to commercialize the system. It's already being tested in animals, and there are no apparent obstacles to its development in the health marketplace, Herman said.

###

Collaborators on the research included the OSU School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering; OSU School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Oregon Health & Science University; and Pacific Diabetes Technologies. Other support came from the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute, and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Greg Herman

541-737-2496

Copyright © Oregon State University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Getting to the root of tooth replantation challenges: Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report a delivery system that promotes healing in tooth replantation in rats September 17th, 2021

Researchers reveal multi-path mechanism in electrochemical CO2 reduction September 17th, 2021

Scientists demonstrate pathway to forerunner of nanotubes that could lead to widespread industrial fabrication September 17th, 2021

Silver nanoparticles boost performance of microbial fuel cells September 17th, 2021

3D & 4D printing/Additive-manufacturing

New 3D-Bioprinter + Bioink Use Living Cells Straight From Culture Plate: Cell models mimicking natural tissue topography herald new era for biomedical research April 13th, 2021

Dynamic 3D printing process features a light-driven twist: Light provides freedom to control each layer and improves precision and speed February 4th, 2021

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste November 27th, 2020

Materials scientists learn how to make liquid crystal shape-shift September 25th, 2020

Nanomedicine

New nano particles suppress resistance to cancer immunotherapy September 17th, 2021

Getting to the root of tooth replantation challenges: Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report a delivery system that promotes healing in tooth replantation in rats September 17th, 2021

Engineering various sources of loss provides new features for perfect light absorption: "Loss is ubiquitous in nature, and by better understanding it, we make it more useful" September 10th, 2021

Leibniz Prize winner Professor Dr. Oliver G. Schmidt moves to Chemnitz University of Technology: President Professor Dr. Gerd Strohmeier refers to an 'absolute top transfer' September 10th, 2021

Sensors

Engineering various sources of loss provides new features for perfect light absorption: "Loss is ubiquitous in nature, and by better understanding it, we make it more useful" September 10th, 2021

Leibniz Prize winner Professor Dr. Oliver G. Schmidt moves to Chemnitz University of Technology: President Professor Dr. Gerd Strohmeier refers to an 'absolute top transfer' September 10th, 2021

Ultrafast & ultrathin: new physics professor at TU Dresden makes mysterious quantum world visible September 10th, 2021

Engineers develop prototype of electronic nose September 3rd, 2021

Announcements

Getting to the root of tooth replantation challenges: Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report a delivery system that promotes healing in tooth replantation in rats September 17th, 2021

Researchers reveal multi-path mechanism in electrochemical CO2 reduction September 17th, 2021

Scientists demonstrate pathway to forerunner of nanotubes that could lead to widespread industrial fabrication September 17th, 2021

Silver nanoparticles boost performance of microbial fuel cells September 17th, 2021

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers/Posters

New nano particles suppress resistance to cancer immunotherapy September 17th, 2021

New physics research reveals fresh complexities about electron behavior in materials September 17th, 2021

Good for groundwater bad for crops? Plastic particles release pollutants in upper soil layers: The environmental geoscientists at the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science (CMESS) focused on a variety of parameters that contribute to plastic pollution in far September 17th, 2021

Ultrasound at the nanometre scale reveals the nature of force September 17th, 2021

Dental

Getting to the root of tooth replantation challenges: Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) report a delivery system that promotes healing in tooth replantation in rats September 17th, 2021

Innovations in dentistry: Navigational surgery, robotics, and nanotechnology October 2nd, 2020

First measurement of electron energy distributions, could enable sustainable energy technologies June 5th, 2020

Gas storage method could help next-generation clean energy vehicles: Tremendous amounts of hydrogen and methane can be stored in nanoscopic pores April 17th, 2020

Printing/Lithography/Inkjet/Inks/Bio-printing/Dyes

With a zap of light, system switches objects' colors and patterns: "Programmable matter" technique could enable product designers to churn out prototypes with ease May 6th, 2021

New 3D-Bioprinter + Bioink Use Living Cells Straight From Culture Plate: Cell models mimicking natural tissue topography herald new era for biomedical research April 13th, 2021

Weak force has strong impact on nanosheets: Rice lab finds van der Waals force can deform nanoscale silver for optics, catalytic use December 15th, 2020

Materials scientists learn how to make liquid crystal shape-shift September 25th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project