Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Optimum inertial design for self-propulsion: A new study investigates the effects of small but finite inertia on the propulsion of micro and nano-scale swimming machines

Streamlines, velocity field, and magnitude of the share of the propelling flow attributed to the low level inertial force, in the case of touching spheres | © Nadal et al.
Streamlines, velocity field, and magnitude of the share of the propelling flow attributed to the low level inertial force, in the case of touching spheres

| © Nadal et al.

Abstract:
Scale plays a major role in locomotion. Swimming microorganisms, such as bacteria and spermatozoa, are subjected to relatively small inertial forces compared to the viscous forces exerted by the surrounding fluid. Such low-level inertia makes self-propulsion a major challenge. Now, scientists have found that the direction of propulsion made possible by such inertia is opposite to that induced by a viscoelastic fluid. These findings have been published in EPJ E by François Nadal from the Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), in Le Barp, France, and colleagues. This study could help to optimise the design of self-propelled micro- and nanoscale artificial swimming machines to improve their mobility in medical applications.

Optimum inertial design for self-propulsion: A new study investigates the effects of small but finite inertia on the propulsion of micro and nano-scale swimming machines

Heidelberg, Germany and New York, NY | Posted on July 29th, 2014

The authors focus on two joined spheres of different radii—dubbed a dumbbell—rotating in a model fluid. They first use simulation to study the effect of a small-scale inertial force on the dumbbell's propulsion. They then compare it with results from theoretical calculations describing locomotion.

They demonstrate that despite the geometrical asymmetry, such a dumbbell cannot self-propel in a pure Newtonian fluid—which is a model fluid whose viscosity does not change with its flow rate—in the absence of inertia. This is because of the underlying laws of physics. If a dumbbell rotating in the counter-clockwise direction propels upwards in the absence of inertia, it would have to move downwards when rotating in the counter-clockwise direction. As both problems are mirror-image symmetric from each other, their propulsion should occur in the same direction and thus without inertia a rotating dumbbell cannot self-propel.

Furthermore, the study shows that a rotating dumbbell propels with the large sphere due to inertial forces in the fluid and the small sphere ahead in a pure viscoelastic fluid. With this in mind, the authors then derive the optimal dumbbell geometry for a self-propelling small-scale swimmer.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Laura Zimmermann

49-622-148-78414

Copyright © Springer

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Reference: F. Nadal, O. S. Pak, L. Zhu, L. Brandt, and E. Lauga (2014). Rotational propulsion enabled by inertia. European Physical Journal E. DOI 10.1140/epje/i2014-14060-y:

Related News Press

News and information

Scientific breakthrough in rechargeable batteries: Researchers from Singapore and Québec Team Up to Develop Next-Generation Materials to Power Electronic Devices and Electric Vehicles February 28th, 2015

First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life: Berkeley Lab research provides comprehensive description of ultra-small bacteria February 28th, 2015

Leti to Offer Updates on Silicon Photonics Successes at OFC in LA February 27th, 2015

Moving molecule writes letters: Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics February 27th, 2015

Molecular Machines

Monitoring the real-time deformation of carbon nanocoils under axial loading February 18th, 2015

Stomach acid-powered micromotors get their first test in a living animal January 27th, 2015

Nanoshuttle wear and tear: It's the mileage, not the age January 26th, 2015

Mysteries of ‘Molecular Machines’ Revealed: Phenix software uses X-ray diffraction spots to produce 3-D image December 22nd, 2014

Molecular Nanotechnology

Monitoring the real-time deformation of carbon nanocoils under axial loading February 18th, 2015

Nanotechnology: Better measurements of single molecule circuits February 18th, 2015

Half spheres for molecular circuits: Corannulene shows promising electronic properties February 17th, 2015

Tiny robotic 'hands' could improve cancer diagnostics, drug delivery February 4th, 2015

Nanomedicine

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy: University of Manchester scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells February 26th, 2015

Cutting-edge technology optimizes cancer therapy with nanomedicine drug combinations: UCLA bioengineers develop platform that offers personalized approach to treatment February 24th, 2015

Optical nanoantennas set the stage for a NEMS lab-on-a-chip revolution February 24th, 2015

Discoveries

First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life: Berkeley Lab research provides comprehensive description of ultra-small bacteria February 28th, 2015

Leti to Offer Updates on Silicon Photonics Successes at OFC in LA February 27th, 2015

Moving molecule writes letters: Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics February 27th, 2015

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Announcements

Scientific breakthrough in rechargeable batteries: Researchers from Singapore and Québec Team Up to Develop Next-Generation Materials to Power Electronic Devices and Electric Vehicles February 28th, 2015

First detailed microscopy evidence of bacteria at the lower size limit of life: Berkeley Lab research provides comprehensive description of ultra-small bacteria February 28th, 2015

Leti to Offer Updates on Silicon Photonics Successes at OFC in LA February 27th, 2015

Moving molecule writes letters: Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics February 27th, 2015

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Moving molecule writes letters: Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics February 27th, 2015

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Real-time observation of bond formation by using femtosecond X-ray liquidography February 26th, 2015

Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy: University of Manchester scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells February 26th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE