Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Bruker Awarded Fourth PeakForce Tapping Patent: AFM Mode Uniquely Combines Highest Resolution Imaging and Material Property Mapping

Abstract:
Bruker today announced it has recently been awarded its fourth patent for PeakForce Tapping®, its proprietary atomic force microscopy mode that uniquely provides a combination of the highest resolution AFM imaging with the most quantitative property mapping data possible. The patent is issued for the PeakForce Tapping's specific method of achieving piconewton level, direct force control. PeakForce Tapping comprises a series of patents that started with the novel concept of high-speed mechanical property mapping (US patent 7,658,097) and evolved into a family of unique AFM modes that include ScanAsyst® (US patent 8,650,660), PeakForce QNM® (US patent 8,646,109) and the recently issued PeakForce Tapping control (US patent 8,739,309). This series of patented offerings have enabled researchers of all AFM experience levels to perform atomic force microscopy imaging with unprecedented precision in force control and access physical properties information at the nanometer scale for broader category of materials. Additionally, PeakForce Tapping has been extended to electrical AFM modes, such as PeakForce TUNA™ and PeakForce KPFM™.

Bruker Awarded Fourth PeakForce Tapping Patent: AFM Mode Uniquely Combines Highest Resolution Imaging and Material Property Mapping

Santa Barbara, CA | Posted on July 22nd, 2014

"As PeakForce Tapping maps the surface, we use feedback to keep the peak interaction force constant, down to tens of piconewtons, in both air and fluid. Because of this simplicity and direct force control, we can preserve the tip as sharp as a few nanometers, which gives us consistent high resolution, including resolving individual atoms," explained Dr. Chanmin Su, PeakForce Tapping co-inventor and Senior Director of Technology of Bruker's AFM Business. "Direct force control at pN level and ability to maintain performance for broad range of samples enable users to acquire high-quality images easily, even on complicated samples as multi-component polymers, biomolecules and cells. At the same time the technology provides rich, high-resolution quantitative nanomechanical and nano-electrical data."

"This latest patent for PeakForce Tapping adds to the rapidly growing list of PeakForce Tapping technology advances that are empowering our customers' AFM work in both materials and life sciences research," added David V. Rossi, Executive Vice President and General Manager of Bruker's AFM Business. "With its ability to achieve the highest resolution imaging while providing quantitative property mapping on whatever you measure, PeakForce Tapping continues to fulfill the full promise of how AFMs can enable the highest level of scientific research. This is supported by the fact that PeakForce Tapping has led to over 700 peer-reviewed publications since its inception. We are very pleased that we have been able to bring this unique technology to the scientific community while also removing some of the traditional barriers associated with atomic force microscopy."

About PeakForce Tapping

PeakForce Tapping permits the use of pN level controlled imaging forces, protecting both fragile probes and samples, and increasing image resolution. In PeakForce Tapping, a complete force-distance curve is obtained and the peak interaction force controlled directly at every pixel in an image. The lateral forces exerted in contact mode are eliminated, as is the spatial averaging of the interaction inherent to TappingMode™. Performance benefits include the ability to simultaneously investigate chemical, electrical properties, nanomechanical characteristics, and topography, while protecting the most fragile probes and samples and increasing image resolution. These capabilities are reflected with over 700 peer reviewed PeakForce Tapping publications in the past 3 years generating nearly 3000 citations. This highlights that the adoption rate of this Bruker exclusive technology in the AFM community surpasses even that of Bruker's industry-standard TappingMode.

####

About Bruker Corporation
Bruker Corporation is a leading provider of high-performance scientific instruments and solutions for molecular and materials research, as well as for industrial and applied analysis.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Stephen Hopkins, Marketing Communications
Bruker Nano Surfaces Division
3400 East Britannia Drive, Suite 150, Tucson, AZ 85706
T: +1 (520) 741-1044 x1022

Copyright © Bruker Corporation

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Imaging

Atom-thick CCD could capture images: Rice University scientists develop two-dimensional, light-sensitive material December 20th, 2014

News and information

Atom-thick CCD could capture images: Rice University scientists develop two-dimensional, light-sensitive material December 20th, 2014

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough December 19th, 2014

Aculon Hires New Business Development Director December 19th, 2014

Announcements

Atom-thick CCD could capture images: Rice University scientists develop two-dimensional, light-sensitive material December 20th, 2014

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough December 19th, 2014

Aculon Hires New Business Development Director December 19th, 2014

Tools

Atom-thick CCD could capture images: Rice University scientists develop two-dimensional, light-sensitive material December 20th, 2014

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Switching to spintronics: Berkeley Lab reports on electric field switching of ferromagnetism at room temp December 17th, 2014

ORNL microscopy pencils patterns in polymers at the nanoscale December 17th, 2014

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Silicon Valley-Based Foresight Valuation Launches STR-IP™, a New Initiative for Startups to Discover the Value of Their Intellectual Property December 18th, 2014

Chemists Fabricate Novel Rewritable Paper: An attractive alternate to regular paper, UC Riverside-developed technology helps address increasing problems in environment and resource sustainability December 2nd, 2014

Dicerna Announces License Agreement with Tekmira to Advance Dicerna’s PH1 Development Program November 17th, 2014

First genetic-based tool to detect circulating cancer cells in blood: NanoFlares light up individual cells if breast cancer biomarker is present November 17th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE