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Home > Press > NEI Corporation introduces NANOMYTE® SR-100EC – An Easy-to-Clean, Scratch Resistant Coating

Abstract:
NEI Corporation announced today that it has introduced a transparent, micron-thick coating that provides both scratch resistance and easy-to-clean properties to surfaces. The waterborne SR- 100EC coating can be applied to plastics such as polycarbonate, PMMA, PET, polyurethane, epoxy, as well as metals such as stainless steel, aluminum, titanium, brass and chrome. The surface treatment is mechanically stable, is highly repellent to water and oils, and it enhances lubricity. By applying SR-100EC on the surface of components, soil and liquids simply slide off the surface, thereby helping prevent deposits and extending the time between cleanings.

NEI Corporation introduces NANOMYTE® SR-100EC – An Easy-to-Clean, Scratch Resistant Coating

Somerset, NJ | Posted on August 20th, 2013

NEI's SR-100EC coating is based on a patent pending, water-based coating composition comprised of functionalized perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs). Although PFPEs are known for their non-stick and lubricating properties, it has been a major technical challenge to incorporate them into a stable formulation that can lead to a coating with sufficient adhesion to various substrates. NEI's SR-100EC formulation overcomes this stability issue. Additionally, while PFPE-based, easy-to-clean coatings currently on the market generally form very thin (< 100nm) coatings, SR-100EC coatings have a thickness of 2-5 microns, thereby creating a more mechanically stable coating that cannot easily be removed by abrasion, harsh cleaners or chemicals.

"The development of SR-100EC was spurred by a need expressed by many of our customers, who wanted a relatively thin coating that is highly hydrophobic and oleophobic, but also hard and transparent," says Dr. Ganesh Skandan, CEO of NEI Corporation. "SR-100EC represents a significant addition to NEI's portfolio of coating products."

SR-100EC is easy to use and is ideally suited for optical lenses, touch screen protectors, stainless steel appliances, hand rails, and faucets. The liquid coating solution can be applied by dipping, spraying, roll or flow coating and is available in 1, 5, and 55 gallon quantities. NEI also offers in-house coatings services for customer parts. Additionally, NEI provides coatings development services wherein coating formulations are created to address specific customer requirements.

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About NEI Corporation
NEI Corporation is an application-driven company that utilizes nanotechnology to develop and produce advanced materials. The company’s core competencies are in synthesizing nanoscale materials and prototyping products that incorporate the advanced materials. NEI offers an array of Advanced Protective Coatings for metal and polymer surfaces. The coatings have tailored functionalities such as anti- corrosion, self-healing, scratch resistance, ice-phobic, and self-cleaning.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ms. Krista Martin
NEI Corporation
(732) 868‐3141

Copyright © NEI Corporation

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For more information, the materials specification sheet for NANOMYTE® SR-100EC can be found here:

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