Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Chemical modules that mimic predator-prey and other behaviors

Scientists have created chemical modules that copy the behavior of predators like jaguars (above) and their prey.
Credit: iStockphoto/Thinkstock
Scientists have created chemical modules that copy the behavior of predators like jaguars (above) and their prey.

Credit: iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Abstract:
Scientists are reporting development of chemical modules that can reproduce, on an "unprecedented" molecular level, changes and interactions that occur in natural populations of plants and animals, including those of hunting and being hunted for food, conducting mutually beneficial relationships and competing for resources. The report on these new "predator-prey biochemical oscillators," which could become building blocks for molecular machines and computers, appears in ACS Nano.

Chemical modules that mimic predator-prey and other behaviors

Washington, DC | Posted on January 9th, 2013

Yannick Rondelez and Teruo Fujii explain that just as plants and animals interact in complex ways in vast "ecosystems" in nature, molecules, such as small synthetic DNA fragments, can be made to interact in complex ways within test tubes. Therefore, animal behaviors, like hunting (as a predator) and being hunted (as prey), could also be applied to molecules, they say. Currently, researchers can build simple circuits with molecules. But to make complex molecular machines and computers (which would provide information-processing ability to wet systems), they need to understand and control how groups of molecules interact with each other, as animals do in nature.

The scientists describe reproducing predator-prey interactions, mutually beneficial relationships and competitive conditions using DNA and enzymes that build up or break down DNA. "Therefore, beside opening the way to the study of fundamental issues of chemical dynamic systems, we also expect that this approach will provide a useful building block in the scaling-up of molecular computers and machines," they say.

####

About American Chemical Society (ACS)
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 164,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Michael Bernstein

202-872-6042

Yannick Rondelez, Ph.D.
The University of Tokyo
4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku
Tokyo 153-8505
Japan

Copyright © American Chemical Society (ACS)

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ARTICLE

Related News Press

News and information

GS7 Graphene Sensor maybe Solution in Fight Against Cancer January 25th, 2015

Toyocolor to Launch New Carbon Nanotube Materials at nano tech 2015 January 24th, 2015

NANOPOSTER 2015 - 5th Virtual Nanotechnology Conference - call for abstracts January 24th, 2015

Nanosensor Used for Simultaneous Determination of Effective Tea Components January 24th, 2015

Molecular Machines

Mysteries of ‘Molecular Machines’ Revealed: Phenix software uses X-ray diffraction spots to produce 3-D image December 22nd, 2014

Creation of 'Rocker' protein opens way for new smart molecules in medicine, other fields December 18th, 2014

Dartmouth researchers create 'green' process to reduce molecular switching waste December 15th, 2014

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing October 31st, 2014

Molecular Nanotechnology

Going with the flow January 16th, 2015

From the bottom up: Manipulating nanoribbons at the molecular level: Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley team engineers the shape and properties of nanoscale strips of graphene January 12th, 2015

DNA Origami Could Lead to Nano “Transformers” for Biomedical Applications: Tiny hinges and pistons hint at possible complexity of future nano-robots January 5th, 2015

'Mind the gap' between atomically thin materials December 23rd, 2014

Chip Technology

The latest fashion: Graphene edges can be tailor-made: Rice University theory shows it should be possible to tune material's properties January 24th, 2015

New method to generate arbitrary optical pulses January 21st, 2015

New signal amplification process set to transform communications, imaging, computing: UC San Diego researchers discover a mechanism to amplify signals in optoelectronic systems that is far more efficient than standard processes January 21st, 2015

Solving an organic semiconductor mystery: Berkeley Lab researchers uncover hidden structures in domain interfaces that hamper performance January 16th, 2015

Discoveries

GS7 Graphene Sensor maybe Solution in Fight Against Cancer January 25th, 2015

Nanosensor Used for Simultaneous Determination of Effective Tea Components January 24th, 2015

The latest fashion: Graphene edges can be tailor-made: Rice University theory shows it should be possible to tune material's properties January 24th, 2015

Silver nanowires demonstrate unexpected self-healing mechanism: The material has potential for flexible electronics January 23rd, 2015

Announcements

GS7 Graphene Sensor maybe Solution in Fight Against Cancer January 25th, 2015

Toyocolor to Launch New Carbon Nanotube Materials at nano tech 2015 January 24th, 2015

NANOPOSTER 2015 - 5th Virtual Nanotechnology Conference - call for abstracts January 24th, 2015

Nanosensor Used for Simultaneous Determination of Effective Tea Components January 24th, 2015

Nanobiotechnology

DNA 'glue' could someday be used to build tissues, organs January 14th, 2015

Photonic crystal nanolaser biosensor simplifies DNA detection: New device offers a simpler and potentially less expensive way to detect DNA and other biomolecules through changes in surface charge density or solution pH January 13th, 2015

Determination of Critical Force, Time for Manipulation of Biological Nanoparticles January 7th, 2015

DNA Origami Could Lead to Nano “Transformers” for Biomedical Applications: Tiny hinges and pistons hint at possible complexity of future nano-robots January 5th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE