Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > UCLA physicists report nanotechnology feat with proteins

Giovanni Zocchi in his lab
Giovanni Zocchi in his lab

Abstract:
UCLA physicists have made nanomechanical measurements of unprecedented resolution on protein molecules.

UCLA physicists report nanotechnology feat with proteins

Los Angeles, CA | Posted on December 17th, 2011

The new measurements, by UCLA physics professor Giovanni Zocchi and former UCLA physics graduate student Yong Wang, are approximately 100 times higher in resolution than previous mechanical measurements, a nanotechnology feat which reveals an isolated protein molecule, surprisingly, is neither a solid nor a liquid. "Proteins are the molecular machines of life, the molecules we are made of," Zocchi said. "We have found that sometimes they behave as a solid and sometimes as a liquid.

"Solids have a shape while liquids flow — for simple materials at low stresses. However, for complex materials, or large stresses, the behavior can be in-between. Subjected to mechanical forces, a material might be elastic and store mechanical energy (simple solid), viscous and dissipate mechanical energy (simple fluid), or visco-elastic and both store and dissipate mechanical energy (complex solid, complex fluid). The viscoelastic behavior characteristic of more complex matter had not been clearly seen before on isolated proteins because mechanical measurements tend to destroy the proteins."

Zocchi and Wang's new nanotechnology method allowed them to apply stresses and probe the mechanics of the protein without destroying it. Wang, now a physics postdoctoral fellow at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, and Zocchi discovered a "transition to a viscoelastic regime in the mechanical response" of the protein.

"Below the transition, the protein responds elastically, like a spring," Zocchi said. "Above the transition, the protein flows like a viscous liquid. However, the transition is reversible if the stress is removed. Functional conformational changes of enzymes (changes in the shape of the molecule) must typically operate across this transition."

The measurements were performed on the enzyme guanylate kinase, or GK, a member of an essential class of enzymes called kinases. Specifically, GK transfers a phosphate group from ATP (the universal "fuel" of the cell) to GMP, producing GDP, an essential metabolic component, Zocchi said.

The study on the characterization of the "visco-elastic transition" is reported this month in the online journal PLoS ONE, a publication of the Public Library of Science. The research was federally funded by the National Science Foundation's division of materials research and by a grant from the University of California Lab Research Program.

Zocchi and Wang published related findings earlier this year in the journal Europhysics Letters, a publication of the European Physical Society, and the journal Physical Review Letters.

In previous research, Zocchi and colleagues reported a significant step in controlling chemical reactions mechanically last year, made a significant step toward a new approach to protein engineering in 2006, created a mechanism at the nanoscale to externally control the function and action of a protein in 2005, and created a first-of-its-kind nanoscale sensor using a single molecule less than 20 nanometers long in 2003. A nanometer is roughly 2,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair.

####

About UCLA
UCLA is California's largest university, with an enrollment of nearly 38,000 undergraduate and graduate students. The UCLA College of Letters and Science and the university's 11 professional schools feature renowned faculty and offer 337 degree programs and majors. UCLA is a national and international leader in the breadth and quality of its academic, research, health care, cultural, continuing education and athletic programs. Six alumni and five faculty have been awarded the Nobel Prize.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Stuart Wolpert

310-206-0511

Copyright © UCLA

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

New Hopes for Treatment of Intestine Cancer by Edible Nanodrug March 2nd, 2015

Imec, Holst Centre and Renesas Present World’s Lowest Power 2.4GHz Radio Chip for Bluetooth Low Energy March 1st, 2015

Imec, Murata, and Huawei Introduce Breakthrough Solution for TX-to-RX Isolation in Reconfigurable, Multiband Front-End Modules for Mobile Phones: Electrical-Balance Duplexers Pave the Way to Integrated Solution for TX-to-RX Isolation March 1st, 2015

Imec Demonstrates Compact Wavelength-Division Multiplexing CMOS Silicon Photonics Transceiver March 1st, 2015

Physics

Moving molecule writes letters: Caging of molecules allows investigation of equilibrium thermodynamics February 27th, 2015

Real-time observation of bond formation by using femtosecond X-ray liquidography February 26th, 2015

Imaging

Renishaw and Bruker team up for a workshop on TERS and co-localised AFM Raman February 26th, 2015

Real-time observation of bond formation by using femtosecond X-ray liquidography February 26th, 2015

Bruker-Sponsored Sixth AFM BioMed Conference Highlights Increasing Impact of AFM in Biological Applications February 26th, 2015

Molecular Machines

Monitoring the real-time deformation of carbon nanocoils under axial loading February 18th, 2015

Stomach acid-powered micromotors get their first test in a living animal January 27th, 2015

Nanoshuttle wear and tear: It's the mileage, not the age January 26th, 2015

Mysteries of ‘Molecular Machines’ Revealed: Phenix software uses X-ray diffraction spots to produce 3-D image December 22nd, 2014

Discoveries

New Hopes for Treatment of Intestine Cancer by Edible Nanodrug March 2nd, 2015

Imec, Murata, and Huawei Introduce Breakthrough Solution for TX-to-RX Isolation in Reconfigurable, Multiband Front-End Modules for Mobile Phones: Electrical-Balance Duplexers Pave the Way to Integrated Solution for TX-to-RX Isolation March 1st, 2015

Imec Demonstrates Compact Wavelength-Division Multiplexing CMOS Silicon Photonics Transceiver March 1st, 2015

Graphene Shows Promise In Eradication Of Stem Cancer Cells March 1st, 2015

Announcements

New Hopes for Treatment of Intestine Cancer by Edible Nanodrug March 2nd, 2015

Imec Demonstrates Compact Wavelength-Division Multiplexing CMOS Silicon Photonics Transceiver March 1st, 2015

onic Present breakthrough in CMOS-based Transceivers for mm-Wave Radar Systems March 1st, 2015

Graphene Shows Promise In Eradication Of Stem Cancer Cells March 1st, 2015

Nanobiotechnology

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Bacteria network for food: Bacteria connect to each other and exchange nutrients February 23rd, 2015

Building tailor-made DNA nanotubes step by step: New, block-by-block assembly method could pave way for applications in opto-electronics, drug delivery February 23rd, 2015

Better batteries inspired by lowly snail shells: Biological molecules can latch onto nanoscale components and lock them into position to make high performing Li-ion battery electrodes, according to new research presented at the 59th annual meeting of the Biophysical Society February 12th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE