Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Suitcase-sized detector can ID anthrax in one hour

Kent Loeffler, Cornell University
This photograph shows the device's microfluidic chip, which measures approximately one centimeter by 3 centimeters and integrates sample purification and real-time PCR analysis chambers.
Kent Loeffler, Cornell University
This photograph shows the device's microfluidic chip, which measures approximately one centimeter by 3 centimeters and integrates sample purification and real-time PCR analysis chambers.

Abstract:
A portable device can detect the presence of the anthrax bacterium in about one hour from a sample containing as few as 40 microscopic spores, report Cornell and University of Albany researchers who invented it. The device could provide early detection in the case of an anthrax attack, saving many lives.

Suitcase-sized detector can ID anthrax in one hour

Ithaca, NY | Posted on July 29th, 2011

The basic design, which is small enough to fit in the overhead compartment of an airplane, potentially could be tailored to detect countless other pathogens, such as salmonella, or be used in the field for DNA forensics.

"It was built with the notion of being portable," said Carl Batt, Liberty Hyde Bailey Professor in the Department of Food Science at Cornell and a co-author of the paper published in July in the International Journal of Biomedical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Vol. 2, No. 2). Nathaniel Cady, Ph.D. '06, a nanoscale engineer at the University of Albany, is the paper's lead author.

Seven years in the making, the detector requires that a sample be inserted into the device. From there the machine automatically recovers cells, collects and purifies DNA and then conducts real-time polymerase chain reactions (PCR) to identify if anthrax is present. PCR can amplify extremely small amounts of DNA and is a well-established platform for rapidly detecting biological material.

The researchers began by acquiring what amounts to a small suitcase-sized plastic box with the notion that, "whatever we do, it has to fit in here. It was a line in the sand, an engineering challenge where everything had to fit in the box," Batt said.

The shape of a heavily reinforced suitcase, the device is complete with pumps, heating and cooling elements, and optical and computational circuitry.

By tailoring different assays to the portable real-time PCR platform, the device could be used for a variety of applications in addition to anthrax detection, such as at a crime scene for forensics. For example, if detectives were to find a sample they believe belongs to a perpetrator, they might use such a device to rapidly and broadly determine the gender or eye color of the suspect.

The researchers are currently working to develop new strategies for pumping fluids in the device, a system that now occupies the majority of the space and most of the power. Novel pumping systems based on silicon processing are being created, which could allow engineers to fabricate most of the components of the system on a single chip.

The research was funded by KRAFT foods, the U. S. Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Justice and Food and Drug Administration.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Krishna Ramanujan

Copyright © Cornell University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Making sense of metallic glass February 9th, 2016

Electron's 1-D metallic surface state observed: A step for the prediction of electronic properties of extremely-fine metal nanowires in next-generation semiconductors February 9th, 2016

Nanoparticle therapy that uses LDL and fish oil kills liver cancer cells February 9th, 2016

From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes February 8th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Making sense of metallic glass February 9th, 2016

Nanoparticle therapy that uses LDL and fish oil kills liver cancer cells February 9th, 2016

Leading bugs to the death chamber: A kinder face of cholesterol February 8th, 2016

From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes February 8th, 2016

Announcements

Making sense of metallic glass February 9th, 2016

Electron's 1-D metallic surface state observed: A step for the prediction of electronic properties of extremely-fine metal nanowires in next-generation semiconductors February 9th, 2016

Nanoparticle therapy that uses LDL and fish oil kills liver cancer cells February 9th, 2016

From allergens to anodes: Pollen derived battery electrodes February 8th, 2016

Homeland Security

Detecting and identifying explosives with single test December 10th, 2015

Columbia engineers build biologically powered chip: System combines biological ion channels with solid-state transistors to create a new kind of electronics December 7th, 2015

Nanoparticle delivery maximizes drug defense against bioterrorism agent: UCLA team develops method for improving drug’s efficacy while reducing side effects November 6th, 2015

Toward clearer, cheaper imaging of ultrafast phenomena: A new, all-optical method for compressing narrow electron pulses to a billionth of a billionth of a second could improve real-time movies of chemical reactions and other ultrafast processes October 14th, 2015

Military

Scientists guide gold nanoparticles to form 'diamond' superlattices: DNA scaffolds cage and coax nanoparticles into position to form crystalline arrangements that mimic the atomic structure of diamond February 4th, 2016

Researchers develop completely new kind of polymer: Hybrid polymers could lead to new concepts in self-repairing materials, drug delivery and artificial muscles January 30th, 2016

Nano-coating makes coaxial cables lighter: Rice University scientists replace metal with carbon nanotubes for aerospace use January 28th, 2016

Scientists build a neural network using plastic memristors: A group of Russian and Italian scientists have created a neural network based on polymeric memristors -- devices that can potentially be used to build fundamentally new computers January 28th, 2016

Food/Agriculture/Supplements

Scientists have put a high precision blood assay into a simple test strip: Researchers have developed a new biosensor test system based on magnetic nanoparticles February 3rd, 2016

Herbal Extracts Applied to Synthesize Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles January 28th, 2016

Antibacterial Nanocomposites Designed in Iran for Foodstuff Packaging January 20th, 2016

HSI 2016 | Hyperspectral Imaging and Applications conference is announced January 13th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic