Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > New Technique Boosts High-Power Potential For Gallium Nitride Electronics

By implanting a buffer made of argon, researchers have created GaN devices that can handle 10 times as much power.
By implanting a buffer made of argon, researchers have created GaN devices that can handle 10 times as much power.

Abstract:
Researchers at North Carolina State University have solved the problem, introducing a buffer that allows the GaN devices to handle 10 times greater power.

New Technique Boosts High-Power Potential For Gallium Nitride Electronics

Raleigh, NC | Posted on February 4th, 2011

Gallium nitride (GaN) material holds promise for emerging high-power devices that are more energy efficient than existing technologies - but these GaN devices traditionally break down when exposed to high voltages. Now researchers at North Carolina State University have solved the problem, introducing a buffer that allows the GaN devices to handle 10 times greater power.

"For future renewable technologies, such as the smart grid or electric cars, we need high-power semiconductor devices," says Merve Ozbek, a Ph.D. student at NC State and author of a paper describing the research. "And power-handling capacity is important for the development of those devices."

Previous research into developing high power GaN devices ran into obstacles, because large electric fields were created at specific points on the devices' edge when high voltages were applied - effectively destroying the devices. NC State researchers have addressed the problem by implanting a buffer made of the element argon at the edges of GaN devices. The buffer spreads out the electric field, allowing the device to handle much higher voltages.

The researchers tested the new technique on Schottky diodes - common electronic components - and found that the argon implant allowed the GaN diodes to handle almost seven times higher voltages. The diodes that did not have the argon implant broke down when exposed to approximately 250 volts. The diodes with the argon implant could handle up to 1,650 volts before breaking down.

"By improving the breakdown voltage from 250 volts to 1,650 volts, we can reduce the electrical resistance of these devices a hundredfold," says Dr. Jay Baliga, Distinguished University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NC State and co-author of the paper. "That reduction in resistance means that these devices can handle ten times as much power."

The paper, "Planar, Nearly Ideal Edge Termination Technique for GaN Devices," is forthcoming from IEEE's Electron Device Letters. The research was supported by NC State's Future Renewable Electric Energy Delivery and Management Systems Center, with funding from the National Science Foundation.

NC State's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is part of the university's College of Engineering.

Abstract

"Planar, Nearly Ideal Edge Termination Technique for GaN Devices"

Authors: A. Merve Ozbek, B. Jayant Baliga, North Carolina State University

Published: Forthcoming, Electron Device Letters

Abstract: In this paper, a simple edge termination is described which can be used to achieve nearly ideal parallel plane breakdown voltage for GaN devices. This technique involves implanting a neutral species on the edges of devices to form a high resistive amorphous layer. With this termination, formed by using argon implantation, the breakdown voltage of GaN Schottky barrier diodes were increased from 300V for unterminated diodes to 1650V after termination.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Matt Shipman
News Services
919.515.6386

Dr. Jay Baliga
919.515.6169

Copyright © North Carolina State University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Haydale Named Lead Sponsor for Cambridge Graphene Festival May 22nd, 2015

Simulations predict flat liquid May 21st, 2015

Researchers develop new way to manufacture nanofibers May 21st, 2015

Nanotherapy effective in mice with multiple myeloma May 21st, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Nanotherapy effective in mice with multiple myeloma May 21st, 2015

Turn that defect upside down: Twin boundaries in lithium-ion batteries May 21st, 2015

INSIDDE: Uncovering the real history of art using a graphene scanner May 21st, 2015

SUNY Poly CNSE and NIOSH Launch Federal Nano Health and Safety Consortium: May 20th, 2015

Possible Futures

Simulations predict flat liquid May 21st, 2015

Nature inspires first artificial molecular pump: Simple design mimics pumping mechanism of life-sustaining proteins found in living cells May 19th, 2015

NNCO and Museum of Science Fiction to Collaborate on Nanotechnology and 3D Printing Panels at Awesome Con May 19th, 2015

Quantum 'gruyres' for spintronics of the future: Topological insulators become a little less 'elusive' May 12th, 2015

Academic/Education

SUNY Poly CNSE and NIOSH Launch Federal Nano Health and Safety Consortium: May 20th, 2015

New JEOL E-Beam Lithography System to Enhance Quantum NanoFab Capabilities May 6th, 2015

FEI Partners With the George Washington University to Equip New Science & Engineering Hall: Suite of new high-performance microscopes will be used for cutting-edge experiments at GWs new research facility April 29th, 2015

Renishaw Raman systems used to study 2D materials at Boston University, Massachusetts, USA. April 28th, 2015

Chip Technology

Nanometrics Announces Live Webcast of Upcoming Investor and Analyst Day May 20th, 2015

Sandia researchers first to measure thermoelectric behavior by 'Tinkertoy' materials May 20th, 2015

Defects can 'Hulk-up' materials: Berkeley lab study shows properly managed damage can boost material thermoelectric performances May 20th, 2015

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Offers New Low-Power 28nm Solution for High-Performance Mobile and IoT Applications: Technology is the first in the industry to provide design enablement support optimized to meet low power requirements of RF SoCs May 20th, 2015

Nanoelectronics

Random nanowire configurations increase conductivity over heavily ordered configurations May 16th, 2015

Channeling valleytronics in graphene: Berkeley Lab researchers discover 1-D conducting channels in bilayer graphene May 6th, 2015

A better way to build DNA scaffolds: McGill researchers devise new technique to produce long, custom-designed DNA strands May 6th, 2015

Surface matters: Huge reduction of heat conduction observed in flat silicon channels April 23rd, 2015

Announcements

Haydale Named Lead Sponsor for Cambridge Graphene Festival May 22nd, 2015

Nanotherapy effective in mice with multiple myeloma May 21st, 2015

Turn that defect upside down: Twin boundaries in lithium-ion batteries May 21st, 2015

INSIDDE: Uncovering the real history of art using a graphene scanner May 21st, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project