Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Sophisticated microscope brings new research opportunities to CMU

Abstract:
Central Michigan University students and faculty who conduct research in genetics, neuroscience or biology in labs across campus now have one more tool to advance their studies.

Sophisticated microscope brings new research opportunities to CMU

Mount Pleasant, MI | Posted on July 19th, 2010

The Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope — a $450,000 microscope unit paired with a high-tech computer — provides not only better precision but also more opportunities for exploration.

"We're able to pose research questions that we couldn't even ask in the past," said CMU biology graduate student Rachel Grattan of Alpena. "It's very exciting to have access to this equipment."

The upgraded features of the microscope, which was purchased with a National Science Foundation grant, now allow for live-cell analysis, which is necessary to continue ongoing research for students and faculty who use live organisms such as worms and shrimp.

One such study involving worms to understand fertility problems in older women has been ongoing for several years at CMU. Now, with the new microscope, researchers can see the dynamic changes that occur among proteins in aging eggs belonging to the worms, which likely will help accelerate their research findings.

"The microscope is very hands-on," said Jenna Plude, a CMU junior majoring in biomedical sciences. "This equipment really allows us to conduct in-depth research and take it to the next level."

In another project, students use fluorescent probes to study DNA and proteins in shrimp embryos, which can be better viewed with the new microscope. One goal of this research is to cause sterility in shrimp, which is greatly needed by the aquaculture industry to protect their investment in improved strains of shrimp.

"This new equipment is already making a difference in our research," said CMU biology professor Jennifer Schisa. "It means new opportunities for both faculty and students, which equates to increased research productivity and enhanced student training."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Tracy Burton
989-774-1072

Copyright © Central Michigan University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Quantum states in a nano-object manipulated using a mechanical system August 3rd, 2015

Nanoparticles used to breach mucus barrier in lungs: Proof-of-concept study conducted in mice a key step toward better treatments for lung diseases August 3rd, 2015

Promising Step Taken in Iran towards Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury August 3rd, 2015

Diagnosis of Salmonella Bacterium-Caused Food Poisoning by Biosensors August 3rd, 2015

Videos/Movies

Take a trip through the brain July 30th, 2015

Caught on camera: The first glimpse of powerful nanoparticles July 17th, 2015

A most singular nano-imaging technique: Berkeley Lab's SINGLE provides images of individual nanoparticles in solution July 16th, 2015

A 'movie' of ultrafast rotating molecules at a hundred billion per second: A quantum wave-like nature was successfully observed in rotating nitrogen molecules July 4th, 2015

Academic/Education

Pakistani Students Who Survived Terror Attack to Attend Weeklong “NanoDiscovery Institute” at SUNY Poly CNSE in Albany July 29th, 2015

Deben reports on the use of their CT500 in the X-ray microtomography laboratory at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia July 22nd, 2015

JPK reports on the use of SPM in the Messersmith Group at UC Berkeley looking at biologically inspired polymer adhesives. July 21st, 2015

Renishaw adds Raman analysis to Scanning Electron Microscopy at the University of Sydney, Australia July 9th, 2015

Announcements

Quantum states in a nano-object manipulated using a mechanical system August 3rd, 2015

Nanoparticles used to breach mucus barrier in lungs: Proof-of-concept study conducted in mice a key step toward better treatments for lung diseases August 3rd, 2015

Promising Step Taken in Iran towards Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury August 3rd, 2015

Diagnosis of Salmonella Bacterium-Caused Food Poisoning by Biosensors August 3rd, 2015

Tools

University of Puerto Rico announces August 11th as the launch date for their NASA mission to look for life in space – XEI reports August 3rd, 2015

Thin films offer promise for ferroelectric devices: Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology demystify the ferroelectric properties observed in hafnium-oxide-based thin films, revealing a potentially useful device material August 3rd, 2015

Heating and cooling with light leads to ultrafast DNA diagnostics July 31st, 2015

Take a trip through the brain July 30th, 2015

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Heating and cooling with light leads to ultrafast DNA diagnostics July 31st, 2015

Springer and Tsinghua University Press present the second Nano Research Award: Paul Alivisatos of the University of California Berkeley receives the honor for outstanding contributions in nanoscience July 30th, 2015

European Technology Platform for Nanomedicine and ENATRANS European Consortium Launch the 2nd edition of the Nanomedicine Award: The Award to be presented at BIO-Europe conference in Munich, November 2015 July 30th, 2015

Publication on Atomic Force Microscopy based nanoscale IR Spectroscopy (AFM-IR) persists as a 2015 top downloaded paper July 29th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project