Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > UB chemist to receive award from American Chemical Society

Sarbajit Banerjee, assistant professor of chemistry
Sarbajit Banerjee, assistant professor of chemistry

Abstract:
A UB chemist has been recognized by the American Chemical Society for his research on a material that could be used in the next generation of transistors.

By ELLEN GOLDBAUM

UB chemist to receive award from American Chemical Society

Buffalo, NY | Posted on June 7th, 2010

Sarbajit Banerjee, assistant professor of chemistry, will be awarded the ExxonMobil Solid-State Chemistry Award at the American Chemical Society's fall meeting in August. The award will be presented by the ACS Division of Inorganic Chemistry.

The award is given "to recognize significant contributions in solid-state chemistry by junior faculty at U.S. institutions and support solid-state chemistry as a recognized discipline," according to the ACS website. Banerjee is the sole recipient this year.

"It's definitely an honor to be recognized so early in my career," Banerjee says, acknowledging that the accolade rewards everyone involved in his project, especially graduate and undergraduate students. "It's essentially recognition from the community that what we do is important."

Banerjee received his undergraduate education at the University of Delhi and his doctorate at Stony Brook University. Before coming to UB, he was a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University.

Banerjee's research includes the study of vanadium oxide, currently used in night-vision technologies. Vanadium oxide is a unique substance that switches between metallic and non-metallic phases at a specific temperature, usually about 160 degrees Fahrenheit. By reducing vanadium oxide to a nanomaterial and doping the material with tungsten, Banerjee and his team have reduced the tipping point to a minimum of around -4 degrees Fahrenheit.

"When we look at crystal structures, what we find is that when you make them small, like a nanoparticle, the arrangement of atoms can change," he says. "We can get all these cool materials that don't normally exist at room temperature. We have a lot of control over how we stabilize them, too."

Another benefit of using these oxides as nanomaterials, Banerjee explains, is that they act more predictably in smaller pieces.

"You can uncover new phenomena that are obscured in larger materials," he says. "You can uncover its intrinsic properties because there aren't as many defects in it."

The research could lead to a new generation of smart materials that could be used in windows, for example, for thermally specific heat conductivity. Banerjee also notes that the material potentially could be used in "high-mobility switching elements, and the next generation of transistors."

He is interested in how different disciplines can collaborate to find chemical solutions to human problems.

"Science is becoming more interdisciplinary as time goes by," he says. "It's actually part of what UB 2020 is all about. A lot of challenges are at the intersection of different disciplines."

Banerjee says he often has students in his classes who are studying engineering, as well as those who are pursuing the natural sciences. For him, the examination and manipulation of the chemical world has merit for everyone, not just those vested in academic interests. Chemistry, he says, is a point of view that unlocks the secret structures within the objects humans take for granted.

"Solid-state chemistry really is the way I see the world," Banerjee says.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © University at Buffalo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Scientists join forces to reveal the mass and shape of single molecules April 27th, 2015

The 16th Trends in Nanotechnology International Conference (TNT 2015) unveils 25 Keynote Speakers: Call for abstracts open April 27th, 2015

Graphenea celebrates fifth anniversary April 27th, 2015

Sensor Designed in Iran Able to Remove Formaldehyde Gas from Environment April 27th, 2015

Chemistry

Scientists join forces to reveal the mass and shape of single molecules April 27th, 2015

Possible Futures

Printing Silicon on Paper, with Lasers April 21st, 2015

A glass fiber that brings light to a standstill: By coupling photons to atoms, light in a glass fiber can be slowed down to the speed of an express train; for a short while it can even be brought to a complete stop April 9th, 2015

Nanotechnology in Medical Devices Market is expected to reach $8.5 Billion by 2019 March 25th, 2015

Nanotechnology Enabled Drug Delivery to Influence Future Diagnosis and Treatments of Diseases March 21st, 2015

Academic/Education

SEFCU, SUNY Poly CNSE Announce Winning Student-Led Teams in the 6th Annual $500,000 New York Business Plan Competition April 25th, 2015

Iranian Female Professor Awarded UNESCO Medal in Nanoscience April 20th, 2015

JPK reports on the use of the NanoWizard® 3 AFM system at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem April 14th, 2015

UK National Graphene Institute Selects Bruker as Official Partner: World-Leading Graphene Research Facility Purchases Multiple Bruker AFMs April 7th, 2015

Chip Technology

Two-dimensional semiconductor comes clean April 27th, 2015

Surface matters: Huge reduction of heat conduction observed in flat silicon channels April 23rd, 2015

Drexel materials scientists putting a new spin on computing memory April 22nd, 2015

Printing Silicon on Paper, with Lasers April 21st, 2015

Nanoelectronics

Surface matters: Huge reduction of heat conduction observed in flat silicon channels April 23rd, 2015

New class of 3D-printed aerogels improve energy storage April 22nd, 2015

‘Oxford Instruments Young Nanoscientist India Award 2015’ to Prof. Arindam Ghosh April 20th, 2015

Advances in molecular electronics: Lights on -- molecule on: Researchers from Dresden and Konstanz succeed in light-controlled molecule switching April 20th, 2015

Announcements

Scientists join forces to reveal the mass and shape of single molecules April 27th, 2015

The 16th Trends in Nanotechnology International Conference (TNT 2015) unveils 25 Keynote Speakers: Call for abstracts open April 27th, 2015

Graphenea celebrates fifth anniversary April 27th, 2015

Sensor Designed in Iran Able to Remove Formaldehyde Gas from Environment April 27th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project