Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > UB chemist to receive award from American Chemical Society

Sarbajit Banerjee, assistant professor of chemistry
Sarbajit Banerjee, assistant professor of chemistry

Abstract:
A UB chemist has been recognized by the American Chemical Society for his research on a material that could be used in the next generation of transistors.

By ELLEN GOLDBAUM

UB chemist to receive award from American Chemical Society

Buffalo, NY | Posted on June 7th, 2010

Sarbajit Banerjee, assistant professor of chemistry, will be awarded the ExxonMobil Solid-State Chemistry Award at the American Chemical Society's fall meeting in August. The award will be presented by the ACS Division of Inorganic Chemistry.

The award is given "to recognize significant contributions in solid-state chemistry by junior faculty at U.S. institutions and support solid-state chemistry as a recognized discipline," according to the ACS website. Banerjee is the sole recipient this year.

"It's definitely an honor to be recognized so early in my career," Banerjee says, acknowledging that the accolade rewards everyone involved in his project, especially graduate and undergraduate students. "It's essentially recognition from the community that what we do is important."

Banerjee received his undergraduate education at the University of Delhi and his doctorate at Stony Brook University. Before coming to UB, he was a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University.

Banerjee's research includes the study of vanadium oxide, currently used in night-vision technologies. Vanadium oxide is a unique substance that switches between metallic and non-metallic phases at a specific temperature, usually about 160 degrees Fahrenheit. By reducing vanadium oxide to a nanomaterial and doping the material with tungsten, Banerjee and his team have reduced the tipping point to a minimum of around -4 degrees Fahrenheit.

"When we look at crystal structures, what we find is that when you make them small, like a nanoparticle, the arrangement of atoms can change," he says. "We can get all these cool materials that don't normally exist at room temperature. We have a lot of control over how we stabilize them, too."

Another benefit of using these oxides as nanomaterials, Banerjee explains, is that they act more predictably in smaller pieces.

"You can uncover new phenomena that are obscured in larger materials," he says. "You can uncover its intrinsic properties because there aren't as many defects in it."

The research could lead to a new generation of smart materials that could be used in windows, for example, for thermally specific heat conductivity. Banerjee also notes that the material potentially could be used in "high-mobility switching elements, and the next generation of transistors."

He is interested in how different disciplines can collaborate to find chemical solutions to human problems.

"Science is becoming more interdisciplinary as time goes by," he says. "It's actually part of what UB 2020 is all about. A lot of challenges are at the intersection of different disciplines."

Banerjee says he often has students in his classes who are studying engineering, as well as those who are pursuing the natural sciences. For him, the examination and manipulation of the chemical world has merit for everyone, not just those vested in academic interests. Chemistry, he says, is a point of view that unlocks the secret structures within the objects humans take for granted.

"Solid-state chemistry really is the way I see the world," Banerjee says.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © University at Buffalo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Global Nano-Enabled Packaging Market For Food and Beverages Will Reach $15.0 billion in 2020 May 26th, 2015

Dr.Theivasanthi Slashes the Price of Graphene Heavily: World first & lowest price Nano-price (30 USD / kg) of graphene by nanotechnologist May 26th, 2015

Fine-tuned molecular orientation is key to more efficient solar cells May 26th, 2015

DNA Double Helix Does Double Duty in Assembling Arrays of Nanoparticles: Synthetic pieces of biological molecule form framework and glue for making nanoparticle clusters and arrays May 25th, 2015

Chemistry

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Conversion of Greenhouse Gases to Syngas in Presence of Nanocatalysts in Iran May 22nd, 2015

Nanosorbent Produced in Iran to Adsorb Tiny Amounts of Aromatic Hydrocarbon from Seawater May 18th, 2015

Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM): Reported successes and failures aid hot pursuit of superconductivity May 15th, 2015

Possible Futures

Global Nano-Enabled Packaging Market For Food and Beverages Will Reach $15.0 billion in 2020 May 26th, 2015

Simulations predict flat liquid May 21st, 2015

Nature inspires first artificial molecular pump: Simple design mimics pumping mechanism of life-sustaining proteins found in living cells May 19th, 2015

NNCO and Museum of Science Fiction to Collaborate on Nanotechnology and 3D Printing Panels at Awesome Con May 19th, 2015

Academic/Education

SUNY Poly CNSE and NIOSH Launch Federal Nano Health and Safety Consortium: May 20th, 2015

New JEOL E-Beam Lithography System to Enhance Quantum NanoFab Capabilities May 6th, 2015

FEI Partners With the George Washington University to Equip New Science & Engineering Hall: Suite of new high-performance microscopes will be used for cutting-edge experiments at GWs new research facility April 29th, 2015

Renishaw Raman systems used to study 2D materials at Boston University, Massachusetts, USA. April 28th, 2015

Chip Technology

One step closer to a single-molecule device: Columbia Engineering researchers first to create a single-molecule diode -- the ultimate in miniaturization for electronic devices -- with potential for real-world applications May 25th, 2015

Basel physicists develop efficient method of signal transmission from nanocomponents May 23rd, 2015

Sandia researchers first to measure thermoelectric behavior by 'Tinkertoy' materials May 20th, 2015

Defects can 'Hulk-up' materials: Berkeley lab study shows properly managed damage can boost material thermoelectric performances May 20th, 2015

Nanoelectronics

One step closer to a single-molecule device: Columbia Engineering researchers first to create a single-molecule diode -- the ultimate in miniaturization for electronic devices -- with potential for real-world applications May 25th, 2015

Basel physicists develop efficient method of signal transmission from nanocomponents May 23rd, 2015

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Random nanowire configurations increase conductivity over heavily ordered configurations May 16th, 2015

Announcements

Global Nano-Enabled Packaging Market For Food and Beverages Will Reach $15.0 billion in 2020 May 26th, 2015

Dr.Theivasanthi Slashes the Price of Graphene Heavily: World first & lowest price Nano-price (30 USD / kg) of graphene by nanotechnologist May 26th, 2015

Fine-tuned molecular orientation is key to more efficient solar cells May 26th, 2015

DNA Double Helix Does Double Duty in Assembling Arrays of Nanoparticles: Synthetic pieces of biological molecule form framework and glue for making nanoparticle clusters and arrays May 25th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project