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Home > News > Self-Powered Flexible Electronics

April 30th, 2010

Self-Powered Flexible Electronics

Abstract:
Touch-screen computing is all the rage, appearing in countless smart phones, laptops, and tablet computers. Now researchers at Samsung and Sungkyunkwan University in Korea have come up with a way to capture power when a touch screen flexes under a user's touch. The researchers have integrated flexible, transparent electrodes with an energy-scavenging material to make a film that could provide supplementary power for portable electronics. The film can be printed over large areas using roll-to-roll processes, but are at least five years from the market.

Source:
technologyreview.com

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