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Home > Press > Asylum Research Offers New Solar Application Note by Ginger Group

Microscopic heterogeneity in (A) topography and (B) photocurrent on P3HT/PCBM blends. (C) Correlation between spatially-averaged photocurrent measured via photoconductive AFM (pcAFM) and EQE measurements for P3HT/PCBM blends annealed for different lengths of time indicate that pcAFM data are qualitatively consistent with expected device performance.
Microscopic heterogeneity in (A) topography and (B) photocurrent on P3HT/PCBM blends. (C) Correlation between spatially-averaged photocurrent measured via photoconductive AFM (pcAFM) and EQE measurements for P3HT/PCBM blends annealed for different lengths of time indicate that pcAFM data are qualitatively consistent with expected device performance.

Abstract:
Asylum Research, a technology leader in scanning probe/atomic force microscopy (AFM/SPM) announces a new application note by the Ginger group at the University of Washington, focusing on their work on Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs). The application note is entitled "New Scanning Probe Techniques for Analyzing Organic Photovoltaic Materials and Devices," by Rajiv Giridharagopal, Guozheng Shao, Chris Groves, and David S. Ginger, Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle. All work for the application note was performed using an MFP-3D-BIO™ Atomic Force Microscope from Asylum Research.

Asylum Research Offers New Solar Application Note by Ginger Group

Raleigh, NC | Posted on April 1st, 2010

The note reviews the instrumental issues associated with the application of scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as photoconductive atomic force microscopy and time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy, which have been shown to be useful in the study of nanostructured organic solar cells. These techniques offer unique insight into the underlying heterogeneity of OPV devices and provide a nanoscale basis for understanding how morphology directly affects OPV operation and efficiency. The note is available on request from Asylum Research and can also be downloaded at www.asylumresearch.com/Applications/Photovoltaics/Photovoltaics.shtml.

"The customizability of the MFP-3D and Asylum's support were critical to the success of the experiments that got me tenure," said co-author and Group Leader, David Ginger. "This note summarizes the instrumental side of our work to date and, in particular, describes some of the new SPM techniques that have been proven to be very useful in evaluating OPV materials."

####

About Asylum Research
Asylum Research is the technology leader in atomic force and scanning probe microscopy (AFM/SPM) for both materials and bioscience applications. Founded in 1999, we are an employee owned company dedicated to innovative instrumentation for nanoscience and nanotechnology, with over 250 years combined AFM/SPM experience among our staff. Our instruments are used for a variety of nanoscience applications in material science, physics, polymers, chemistry, biomaterials, and bioscience, including single molecule mechanical experiments on DNA, protein unfolding and polymer elasticity, as well as force measurements for biomaterials, chemical sensing, polymers, colloidal forces, adhesion, and more. Asylum’s product line offers imaging and measurement capabilities for a wide range of samples, including advanced techniques such as electrical characterization (CAFM, KFM, EFM), high voltage piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), thermal analysis, quantitative nanoindenting, and a wide range of environmental accessories and application-ready modules.

Asylum’s MFP-3D set the standard for AFM technology, with unprecedented precision and flexibility. The MFP-3D is the first AFM with true independent piezo positioning in all three axes, combined with low noise closed-loop feedback sensor technology. The MFP-3D offers both top and bottom sample viewing and easy integration with most commercially-available inverted optical microscopes.

Asylum’s new Cypher AFM is the world’s first new small sample AFM/SPM in over a decade, and sets the new standard as the world’s highest resolution AFM. Cypher provides low-drift closed loop atomic resolution for the most accurate images and measurements possible today, rapid AC imaging with small cantilevers, Spot-On™ automated laser alignment for easy setup, integrated thermal, acoustic and vibration control, and broad support for all major AFM/SPM scanning modes and capabilities.

Asylum Research offers the lowest cost of ownership of any AFM company. Ask us about our industry-best 2-year warranty, our legendary product and applications support, and our exclusive 6-month money-back satisfaction guarantee. We are dedicated to providing the most technically advanced AFMs for researchers who want to take their experiments to the next level. Asylum Research also distributes third party cantilevers from Olympus, Nanoworld/Nanosensors, and our own MFM and iDrive™ tips.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Jennifer Jones


Asylum Research Corp.
940 Main Campus Drive, Suite 130
Raleigh, NC 27606
919-861-7420 office
919-861-7425 fax

Corporate Office:
6310 Hollister Ave
Santa Barbara, CA 93117
805-696-6466 office
888-472-2795 toll free

Copyright © Asylum Research

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