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Home > Press > Seven from JHU named AAAS fellows

Peter C. Searson
Peter C. Searson

Abstract:
Seven Johns Hopkins researchers from four of the university's schools have been elected by their peers as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Seven from JHU named AAAS fellows

Baltimore, MD | Posted on January 5th, 2010

As part of the section on engineering, Peter C. Searson, the Joseph R. and Lynn C. Reynolds Professor of Materials Science and Engineering in the Whiting School, was elected for distinguished contributions to the field of surface chemistry and nanoscience. His research interests include surface and molecular engineering and semiconductor quantum dots.

Searson directs the interdivisional Institute for NanoBioTechnology, which was launched in May 2006 to bring together Johns Hopkins researchers in the fields of medicine, engineering, the sciences, and public health to create knowledge and develop technologies to revolutionize health care and medicine. INBT has more than 190 affiliated faculty members.

Searson has secondary appointments in the Krieger School's Department of Physics and Astronomy and the School of Medicine's Department of Oncology.

As part of the section on engineering, Denis Wirtz, the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in the Whiting School, was elected for contributions to cell micromechanics and cell adhesion and for the development and application of particle-tracking methods to probe the micromechanical properties of living cells in normal conditions and disease states.

Wirtz studies the biophysical properties of healthy and diseased cells, including interactions between adjacent cells and the role of cellular architecture on nuclear shape and gene expression. Wirtz directs the newly formed Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center, a Physical Sciences in Oncology Program center of the National Cancer Institute. EOC brings together Johns Hopkins experts in cancer biology, molecular and cellular biophysics, applied mathematics, materials science and physics to study and model cellular mobility and the assorted biophysical forces involved in the spread of cancer.

Wirtz also serves as co-director of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology and has a joint appointment in the School of Medicine's Department of Oncology.

Read the entire article, here:

gazette.jhu.edu/2010/01/04/seven-from-jhu-named-aaas-fellows/

####

About Johns Hopkins
The Johns Hopkins University opened in 1876, with the inauguration of its first president, Daniel Coit Gilman. "What are we aiming at?" Gilman asked in his installation address. "The encouragement of research ... and the advancement of individual scholars, who by their excellence will advance the sciences they pursue, and the society where they dwell."

The mission laid out by Gilman remains the university's mission today, summed up in a simple but powerful restatement of Gilman's own words: "Knowledge for the world."

For more information, please click here

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