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Home > News > Looking down the tube – How defects make nano-objects better

October 29th, 2008

Looking down the tube – How defects make nano-objects better

Abstract:
They are extremely light, yet stronger than steel and more resilient than diamond. They are nearly unbeatable as heat and electricity conductors. In some cases, they even become superconductors with no electric resistance: carbon nanotubes are - at a diameter of a few millionths of a millimeter - truly a tiny wonder, and are awakening great hope in all branches of industry from metrology to optoelectronics. An international research group that includes scientists from LMU has now shown that defects in nanotubes can actually make the material better. Selective doping can change the electrical conductivity and other properties of the nanostructures to suit their intended purpose. This work revolved around the new, highly complex microscopy technology dubbed TENOM. The LMU researchers have also used this technology previously to study various nanotube systems in higher resolution than ever before. One of the things they demonstrated was that a complex of nanotubes and DNA makes an ideal sensor for individual molecules - right down to the nanoscale.

Source:
chemie.de

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