Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Learn About ‘NIST and Nanosoccer’ from New Web Site and Video

From the video “Bend It Like NIST”, artist rendition of a tiny robot approaching a malfunctioning red blood cell in order to destroy it. NIST-organized soccer competitions for microbots provide a venue for testing agility, maneuverability, response to computer control and the ability to move objects—all skills that future miniaturized “surgeons” will need.

Still Credit: Constantinos Mavroidis, BionanoRobotics Laboratory, Northeastern University
From the video “Bend It Like NIST”, artist rendition of a tiny robot approaching a malfunctioning red blood cell in order to destroy it. NIST-organized soccer competitions for microbots provide a venue for testing agility, maneuverability, response to computer control and the ability to move objects—all skills that future miniaturized “surgeons” will need.
Still Credit: Constantinos Mavroidis, BionanoRobotics Laboratory, Northeastern University

Abstract:
If you love soccer but don't want to wait until the next World Cup in 2010 to satisfy your appetite for the most popular game on Earth, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has the answer—though the nourishment comes in very small bites.

Learn About ‘NIST and Nanosoccer’ from New Web Site and Video

GAITHERSBURG, MD | Posted on May 29th, 2008

Nanosoccer—the Lilliputian competition where computer-driven "nanobots" the size of dust mites challenge one another on fields no bigger than a grain of rice—will celebrate its first birthday this summer, and NIST is marking the anniversary with a new Web site at www.nist.gov/public_affairs/calmed/nanosoccer.html. Highlighting the site is a link to the recently produced video, "Bend It Like NIST: Tiny Soccer Players Pave Way for Microbots," a 2-minute program that demonstrates how nanosoccer "road tests" agility, maneuverability, response to computer control and the ability to move objects—all skills that future miniaturized robot workers will need for tasks such as microsurgery within the human body or the manufacturing of atom-sized components for microscopic electronic devices.

The soccer nanobots are operated by remote control under an optical microscope. They move in response to changing magnetic fields or electrical signals transmitted across the microchip arena. Although the bots are a few tens of micrometers to a few hundred micrometers long, they are considered "nanoscale" because their masses range from a few nanograms to a few hundred nanograms. They are manufactured from materials such as aluminum, nickel, gold, silicon and chromium.

The new "NIST and Nanosoccer" Web site features summaries of the first two events in nanosoccer history: the July 2007 debut demonstration and competition at the international RoboCup in Atlanta, Ga., and the just-concluded demonstration at the RoboCup U.S. Open in Pittsburgh, Pa.

NIST jointly organized these "Nanogram League" events with RoboCup, an international organization dedicated to fostering innovations and advances in artificial intelligence and intelligent robotics by using the game of soccer as a testing ground. NIST's goal in coordinating competitions between the world's smallest robots is to show the feasibility and accessibility of technologies for fabricating MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS), tiny mechanical devices built onto semiconductor chips and measured in micrometers (millionth of a meter).

Next up on the nanosoccer schedule is the first official Nanogram League competition for soccer nanobots at the July 2009 international RoboCup event in Austria. Academic institutions interested in organizing nanosoccer teams for the contest should contact Craig McGray, , (301) 975-4110.

####

About NIST
From automated teller machines and atomic clocks to mammograms and semiconductors, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Founded in 1901, NIST is a non-regulatory federal agency within the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST's mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Michael E. Newman

(301) 975-3025

Copyright © NIST

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

View Video

Related News Press

News and information

March 2016; 6th Int'l Conference on Nanostructures in Iran July 29th, 2015

Non-Enzyme Sensor Determines Level of Blood Sugar July 29th, 2015

Flexible Future of Point-of-Care Disease Diagnostic July 29th, 2015

Meet the high-performance single-molecule diode: Major milestone in molecular electronics scored by Berkeley Lab and Columbia University team July 29th, 2015

Videos/Movies

Caught on camera: The first glimpse of powerful nanoparticles July 17th, 2015

A most singular nano-imaging technique: Berkeley Lab's SINGLE provides images of individual nanoparticles in solution July 16th, 2015

A 'movie' of ultrafast rotating molecules at a hundred billion per second: A quantum wave-like nature was successfully observed in rotating nitrogen molecules July 4th, 2015

Freezing single atoms to absolute zero with microwaves brings quantum technology closer: Atoms frozen to absolute zero using microwaves July 2nd, 2015

Announcements

Non-Enzyme Sensor Determines Level of Blood Sugar July 29th, 2015

Flexible Future of Point-of-Care Disease Diagnostic July 29th, 2015

Meet the high-performance single-molecule diode: Major milestone in molecular electronics scored by Berkeley Lab and Columbia University team July 29th, 2015

Detecting small metallic contaminants in food via magnetization: A practical metallic-contaminant detecting system using three high-Tc RF superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) July 29th, 2015

Human Interest/Art

Pakistani Students Who Survived Terror Attack to Attend Weeklong “NanoDiscovery Institute” at SUNY Poly CNSE in Albany July 29th, 2015

Renishaw's inVia confocal Raman microscope system is being used in conservation activities at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the Netherlands June 16th, 2015

New sensing tech could help detect diseases, fraudulent art, chemical weapons June 1st, 2015

INSIDDE: Uncovering the real history of art using a graphene scanner May 21st, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project