Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > FEST Award Promotes Innovative Nanoelectronics Research

    Avik Ghosh 

    (Photo: Melissa Maki)
Avik Ghosh
(Photo: Melissa Maki)

Abstract:
Avik Ghosh, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Virginia, recently won an internal Fund for Excellence in Science and Technology Distinguished Young Investigator Grant for a research proposal that could ultimately transform transistor technology.

FEST Award Promotes Innovative Nanoelectronics Research

Charlottesville, VA | Posted on May 28th, 2008

Transistors are tiny devices that control electric current and voltage. Considered a pivotal invention of the 20th century, they are a key component of computer chips as well as most other modern electronic devices. Currently available transistors are comprised of silicon, but the demand for smaller and more powerful electronic gadgets has uncovered the limitations of silicon transistor technology, including problems with heat dissipation and processing speed.

Enter Ghosh, who specializes in evaluating the properties of materials at the nanoscale by using high-powered computational techniques and physics. Ghosh notes that researchers have been working for years to scale down transistors and make them faster, cheaper and more reliable. One approach to this challenge involves the exploration of new materials.

One of the most recent materials to show theoretical promise is the graphene nanoribbon a ribbony layer of graphite that is only an atom thick. Ghosh's FEST-backed research will explore the properties of graphene nanoribbons to determine whether they may consistently provide advantages in electrical conductivity that would rival silicon. Initial research has shown that graphene nanoribbons may enable devices with superior electrical properties, potentially resulting in transistors that are intrinsically much faster than those that are currently available.

Ghosh's expertise is in modeling and simulation on the atomic scale, and he has already established both internal and external collaborations in physics, chemistry and materials science to assist with his ambitious research. "Our group is theoretical, but we partner with experimentalists who are trying to build devices," said Ghosh. "We need experiments both to benchmark our theories and to test our predictions."

With the FEST funding, Ghosh will be able to hire a graduate student for a year to get the initial results and proof of concept to establish the capabilities of graphene-based devices and a fuller understanding of their advantages and disadvantages. Ghosh's goal is to be able to pattern an entire circuit out of graphene, using a combination of existing practices and new techniques.

Research on graphene-based devices has gained momentum of late, but Ghosh believes his holistic, interdisciplinary approach, which is focused on electronics applications, makes his work stand out from the rest. "What's unique about us is that we are actually partnering with experimentalists and the circuit theorists and trying to get a total story about graphene, not just a piecemeal part of the story," he said.

The FEST Distinguished Young Investigator Grant Program is administered by U.Va.'s Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies and supports junior faculty research in the sciences, engineering and medicine.

More information about Ghosh's work and other related research can be found on the Virginia nano-computing Web site (www.ece.virginia.edu/vino/home.html).

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Melissa Maki
(434) 243-2203

Copyright © University of Virginia

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops May 1st, 2016

Searching for a nanotech self-organizing principle May 1st, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Nanoelectronics

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production April 30th, 2016

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material April 29th, 2016

With simple process, UW-Madison engineers fabricate fastest flexible silicon transistor April 21st, 2016

All powered up: UCI chemists create battery technology with off-the-charts charging capacity April 21st, 2016

Announcements

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops May 1st, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production April 30th, 2016

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Brookhaven's Oleg Gang Named a Battelle 'Inventor of the Year': Recognized for work using DNA to guide and regulate the self-assembly of nanoparticles into clusters and arrays with controllable properties April 25th, 2016

Zip software can detect the quantum-classical boundary: Compression of experimental data reveals the presence of quantum correlations April 21st, 2016

Making electronics out of coal: Instead of burning up this complex hydrocarbon, let's make devices from it April 20th, 2016

Nano-magnets produce 3-dimensional images: Wide-view 3-dimensional holographic display composed of nano-magnetic pixels April 20th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic