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Home > News > 'Kinky' motion of primitive spiral bacteria could propel micromachines of the future

September 16th, 2007

'Kinky' motion of primitive spiral bacteria could propel micromachines of the future

Abstract:
The kinky motion of a primitive spiral-shaped bacterium in fluid, could help design efficient micromachines of the future, a new study by German physicists from the Technical University Munich, has revealed.
Roland Netz and his team have developed a computer model of the motion of Spiroplasma, which swims through fluid by sending kinks down its body.

The scientists believe their results could be important for one day designing micromachines that might be used for microscale manufacturing or for medical procedures.

Source:
newkerala.com

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