Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


Home > Press > Quantum Dots Reach Clinical Lab

Bioconjugated quantum dots - luminescent nanoparticles linked to biological molecules - have shown great promise as tools for disease diagnosis and treatment, but their medical use has been limited by the lack of specific instructions for clinicians. Now, new clinical protocols detailing how to prepare, process and quantify these tiny particles will arm laboratory physicians with the information they need to track biomarkers in cells and tissues.

Quantum Dots Reach Clinical Lab

Atlanta, GA | Posted on May 24th, 2007

The new research guidelines and results were published in the May 3 issue of Nature Protocols.

Using prostate cancer specimens, researchers at Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology have confirmed that bioconjugated quantum dots are effective in simultaneously identifying multiple molecular biomarkers in cancer tissue. The technology is a variation of immunohistochemistry, the laboratory staining process commonly used by pathologists to identify proteins in a tissue section from a cancer patient.

The scientists developed detailed protocols for using the technology, including antibody conjugation, preparation of tissue specimens, multicolor quantum staining, image processing and biomarker quantification. They also have developed bioinformatics and software tools for automated feature extraction and biomarker quantification.

The Emory-Georgia Tech team was led by Shuming Nie, a distinguished professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and by May Dongmei Wang, assistant professor in the Coulter Department and Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Scholar. Key faculty investigators at Emory also include Leland Chung, professor of urology, Ruth O'Regan, MD, associate professor of hematology and oncology, John Petros, MD, professor of urology, and Jonathan Simons, MD, professor of biomedical engineering, hematology and oncology.

"I would like to thank all our investigators for their contributions to this tour de force project, which took more than two years to complete involving 12 investigators in five academic departments," says Nie.

"We have now resolved a major bottleneck in the use of multicolor quantum dot probes for cancer immunohistostaining," says Nie. "Quantum dot probes used in tissue diagnosis are considered to be one of the most important and clinically relevant applications for cancer technology in the near term. We believe that this technology will be ultimately useful in correlating a panel of biomarkers with disease progression and therapeutic response."

"Personalized medicine is poised to transform healthcare over the next several decades," says Wang, director of the bioinformatics and biocomputing core in the Emory-Georgia Tech Nanotechnology Center (CCNE). "New diagnostic and prognostic tools will increase our ability to predict the likely outcomes of drug therapy. Essential to this endeavor is the use of bioinformatics and systems biology to link each individual's molecule profile with disease diagnosis and treatment decisions."

Nanoparticles, which can be as tiny as 100,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair, have special "quantum" properties, including changes in color according to minute differences in size. Bioconjugated quantum dots are collections of different sized nanoparticles embedded in tiny beads made of polymer material. In a process called "multiplexing," they can be finely tuned to a myriad of lumninescent colors that can tag a multitude of different protein biomarkers or genetic sequences in cells or tissues.

Because the quantum dots have a cadmium core, scientists have been concerned about their potential toxicity if infused into the bloodstream of patients. Using the dots in the laboratory to detect biomarkers in cells and tissues outside the human body eliminates this concern. Quantum dots also have advantages over traditional dyes and stains often used in imaging. They are more brightly fluorescent, they resist photo bleaching and they can emit a broad range of colors simultaneously.

These properties make bioconjugated quantum dots highly promising for improving the sensitivity of disease diagnosis in the laboratory, and they are particularly important for detecting and analyzing cancer biomarkers that are present at low concentrations or in small numbers of cells. Biomarkers include altered or mutant genes, RNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and small metabolite molecules.

"Aggressive cancer behaviors also could be better understood and rapidly predicted using these kinds of biomarkers," says Nie. "By defining the interrelationships between biomarkers, it could be possible to diagnose and determine cancer prognosis based on a patient's molecular profile, leading to personalized and predictive medicine."

The Emory and Georgia Tech scientists also believe the bioconjugated quantum dots will be useful in detection of bioterrorism agents such as anthrax, plague, botulism and viral hemorrhagic fevers.

Wang's group in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech has developed a number of software tools for cancer nanotechnology, leading a major effort in "bio-nano-info" integration for personalized medicine.

The research was supported by a Bioengineering Research Partnership (BRP) award and a Centers of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE) award, both from the National Cancer Institute. The work was also supported by the Microsoft eScience Program, the Georgia Cancer Coalition (GCC) and the Georgia Research Alliance (GRA).


About Georgia Institute of Technology
The Georgia Institute of Technology is one of the nation's premiere research universities. Ranked eighth among U.S. News & World Report's top public universities, Georgia Tech's 17,000 students are enrolled in its Colleges of Architecture, Computing, Engineering, Liberal Arts, Management and Sciences. Tech is among the nation's top producers of women and African-American engineers. The Institute offers research opportunities to both undergraduate and graduate students and is home to more than 100 interdisciplinary units plus the Georgia Tech Research Institute.

For more information, please click here

Megan McRainey, Institute Communications & Public Affairs


Copyright © Georgia Institute of Technology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Nature Protocols paper

The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University

Emory-Georgia Tech Nanotechnology Center

Related News Press


UTA researcher to build internal nanotechnology device to simplify blood sugar testing: Medical technologies December 1st, 2015

Tiny octopods catalyze bright ideas: Rice-led study shows plasmonic sensors and catalysts need not be mutually exclusive November 30th, 2015

Nanoparticles simplify DNA identification and quantification November 27th, 2015

Scientists 'see' detailed make-up of deadly toxin for the first time: Exciting advance provides hope for developing novel potential method of treating pneumococcal diseases such as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia November 25th, 2015


CEA-Leti to Share Insights into Post-7-nanometer Technologies At Workshop Prior to IEDM in Washington, D.C.: Research Includes CMOS Device Architectures, New Materials and Computing System Paradigms December 1st, 2015

Nano-walkers take speedy leap forward with first rolling DNA-based motor: Fastest DNA motor holds potential for disease diagnostics December 1st, 2015

UTA researcher to build internal nanotechnology device to simplify blood sugar testing: Medical technologies December 1st, 2015

Graphene-Coated Wearable 'E-Textile' Can Alert Wearer To Presence Of Dangerous Gases December 1st, 2015

Homeland Security

Nanoparticle delivery maximizes drug defense against bioterrorism agent: UCLA team develops method for improving drug’s efficacy while reducing side effects November 6th, 2015

Toward clearer, cheaper imaging of ultrafast phenomena: A new, all-optical method for compressing narrow electron pulses to a billionth of a billionth of a second could improve real-time movies of chemical reactions and other ultrafast processes October 14th, 2015

Nanopaper as an optical sensing platform July 23rd, 2015

Iranian Scientists Design Nano Device to Detect Cyanogen Toxic Gas June 23rd, 2015

Quantum Dots/Rods

Navy researchers recruit luminescent nanoparticles to image brain function November 19th, 2015

Electrons always find a (quantum) way November 19th, 2015

Quantum Dots Have Good News about Higher Efficiency in Solar Cells November 16th, 2015

Quantum dots made from fool's gold boost battery performance November 12th, 2015

The latest news from around the world, FREE

  Premium Products
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More

Nanotechnology Now Featured Books


The Hunger Project

Car Brands
Buy website traffic