Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Sugar hit for "green" chemical industry

Abstract:
Australia may take a place in the front line of the global biochemical industry thanks to a new partnership between The University of Queensland and a major South Korean academy.

Sugar hit for "green" chemical industry

Seoul, South Korea and Queensland, Australia | Posted on May 3rd, 2007

UQ and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have teamed up to develop and patent the technology to convert sugar cane into "green" plastics and chemicals.

Queensland Premier Peter Beattie witnessed the signing of a UQ-KAIST agreement in Seoul today.

UQ Senior Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Paul Greenfield, who signed the agreement, said that the $2000 billion global chemical industry was expected to shift from reliance on oil to reliance on biomass in coming decades.

"Researchers from UQ's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) and KAIST will aim to perfect the technology to use sugar cane instead of fossil fuel to manufacture plastics and chemicals," Professor Greenfield said.

"As well as assisting economic growth and job creation in Australia, this will help Australians contribute to a better global environment.

"Replacing oil with sugarcane would reduce the use of non-renewable resources for chemicals by up to 90 percent. Chemical production currently accounts for seven percent of the world's energy use," Professor Greenfield said.

Mr Beattie said: "Now we have one of the world's top research partnerships on the case, and that means we're driving a whole new industry."

The UQ-KAIST partnership matches Queensland's strengths in sugar cane production with South Korea's status as a global chemicals giant.

It offers the potential to create jobs in regional Australia. Biorefineries should be built close to cane farms in order to use low cost, green energy supplied by bagasse (a sugar by-product). About 1000 employees would be needed to build a biorefinery.

Recent advances in biotechnology allow us to "program" microorganisms to make complex chemicals from simple renewables such as sugar cane. KAIST, regarded as the "MIT of South Korea", is a world leader in this programming, while UQ's AIBN has world-class experts in bioplastic production and characterization.

"We have things that South Korea needs: raw materials for biochemicals; and bioplastics research expertise," Professor Greenfield said.

####

About University of Queensland
AIBN is Australia's only fully-integrated research institution where scientists and engineers collaborate to solve problems at the point where biotechnology and nanotechnology meet.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Media contact:

ph: 61 413 380 012

Copyright © University of Queensland

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Materials/Metamaterials

Chromium-centered cycloparaphenylene rings for making functionalized nanocarbons January 26th, 2015

Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers January 26th, 2015

Toyocolor to Launch New Carbon Nanotube Materials at nano tech 2015 January 24th, 2015

The latest fashion: Graphene edges can be tailor-made: Rice University theory shows it should be possible to tune material's properties January 24th, 2015

Announcements

New pathway to valleytronics January 27th, 2015

Entanglement on a chip: Breakthrough promises secure communications and faster computers January 27th, 2015

Detection of Heavy Metals in Samples with Naked Eye January 26th, 2015

Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers January 26th, 2015

Human Interest/Art

OCSiAl supports NanoART Imagery Contest January 23rd, 2015

EnvisioNano: An image contest hosted by the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) January 22nd, 2015

Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Announces AFM Image Contest Winners January 11th, 2015

Longhorn beetle inspires ink to fight counterfeiting November 5th, 2014

Nanobiotechnology

Nanoshuttle wear and tear: It's the mileage, not the age January 26th, 2015

Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers January 26th, 2015

DNA 'glue' could someday be used to build tissues, organs January 14th, 2015

Photonic crystal nanolaser biosensor simplifies DNA detection: New device offers a simpler and potentially less expensive way to detect DNA and other biomolecules through changes in surface charge density or solution pH January 13th, 2015

Alliances/Partnerships/Distributorships

Entanglement on a chip: Breakthrough promises secure communications and faster computers January 27th, 2015

Smart keyboard cleans and powers itself -- and can tell who you are January 21st, 2015

DNA 'glue' could someday be used to build tissues, organs January 14th, 2015

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Linear Dimensions to Offer Joint Analog Solution For Fast-Growing Wearables and MEMs Sensors Markets January 9th, 2015

Research partnerships

Visualizing interacting electrons in a molecule: Scientists at Aalto University and the University of Zurich have succeeded in directly imaging how electrons interact within a single molecule January 26th, 2015

Promising use of nanodiamonds in delivering cancer drug to kill cancer stem cells: NUS study shows that delivery of Epirubicin by nanodiamonds resulted in a normally lethal dosage of Epirubicin becoming a safe and effective dosage for treatment of liver cancer January 26th, 2015

Wearable sensor clears path to long-term EKG, EMG monitoring January 20th, 2015

Graphene enables all-electrical control of energy flow from light emitters: First signatures of graphene plasmons at telecommunications wavelength revealed January 20th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE